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Written Answers

Thursday, 16 February 2006.

Asylum Seekers: Children

Lord Hylton asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Bassam of Brighton: Discussions have been taking place with Liverpool City Council and some other local authorities aimed at providing the Immigration Service with assistance from social workers skilled in assessing age. Funding forms part of these discussions. There are currently around 200 unaccompanied asylum-seeking children in Liverpool. It is not possible to say if any are former child soldiers or have been intentionally trafficked. I would expect any evidence of this to be brought forward as part of an individual's claim for asylum.

Aviation Health: Contaminated Air

Lord Tyler asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Davies of Oldham: The mechanism for reporting contaminated air events is well established through the CAA mandatory occurrence reporting scheme, which is organised to receive reports of incidents affecting airworthiness.

In the case of the incident involving flight G-BIKI on 9 November 1998, this was unfortunately not reported to the CAA at the time by the airline involved due to an administrative oversight. On 18 January 2006 the incident was drawn to the department's attention by a member of the flight crew. The CAA has subsequently contacted the airline concerned. Under the mandatory occurrence reporting scheme, flight crew themselves have the right to contact the CAA directly about an incident if they choose to, and to have their confidentiality respected.
 
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We remain satisfied with the effectiveness of this system because it enables both airlines and crews separately to report incidents to the independent regulator.

Aviation: BAA

Lord Hanningfield asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Davies of Oldham: The Government are following the market activity around the ownership of British Airports Authority (BAA). Our view of the strategic importance of airports, including those owned by BAA, to the UK economy is set out in the 2003 air transport White Paper.

Aviation: CAA Charges

Lord Rotherwick asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Davies of Oldham: The Civil Aviation Authority's (CAA's) policy is to undertake RIAs wherever appropriate. In this case, the CAA did not undertake a formal RIA because there was no change in regulatory policy.

During the development of its safety regulation charges the CAA undertook impact analyses for the following regulatory areas, all of which include large as well as very small operators:

The analyses were compiled with an emphasis on identifying the impact on the smaller organisations.

Aviation: In-flight Emergencies

Lord Rotherwick asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Davies of Oldham: Flight crew can declare emergencies at two levels: Pan and Mayday. A Pan call concerns the safety of an aircraft, or of a person on
 
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board, where immediate assistance is not required. A Mayday call is the more serious. A Mayday call does not necessarily indicate that the aircraft is in imminent danger but that the crew requires urgent attention from the air traffic controller.
Scheduled Landings Declaring An Emergency Into London Heathrow Over Past Five Years

ReasonPanMayday
Passenger medical
emergencies100614
Technical problems21223
Other emergencies877
Total130544


The following aircraft types were involved (aircraft type is not recorded for passenger medical emergencies):

A300, A319, A320, A321, A330, A340, B737, B747, B757, B767, B777, BAE146, CL600RJ Regional Jet, Concorde, DC10, DC8, Fokker 100, MD 90 Srs, MD11.
Emergency Diversions Into London Heathrow Over Last Five Years

ReasonPanMayday
Passenger medical
emergencies190
Technical problems95
Other emergencies40
Total325


The following aircraft types were involved (aircraft type is not recorded for passenger medical emergencies): A340, B737, B747, B757, B767, B777, BAe 146, Challenger 600.
Scheduled Landings Declaring An Emergency Into London Gatwick Over Last Five Years

ReasonPanMayday
Passenger medical
emergencies3558
Technical problems696
Other emergencies182
Total44216

The following aircraft types were involved (aircraft type is not recorded for passenger medical emergencies):

A319, A320, A321, A330, ATR 42, ATR 72, B737, B747, B757, B767, B777, BAE146, Bell 206 Jet Ranger, DC10, EMB145, Jetstream 41, SD360.

Emergency Diversions Into London GatwickOver Last Five Years
ReasonPanMayday
Passenger medical
emergencies213
Technical problems195
Other emergencies40
Total448

 
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The following aircraft types were involved (aircraft type is not recorded for passenger medical emergencies): A320, B757, B767, B777, BAe 146, Canadair CL600RJ, DHC8, Embraer 145, MD11, Helicopter - Military.

Big Lottery Fund

Viscount Eccles asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Davies of Oldham: The Big Lottery Fund is the operating name of the National Lottery Charities Board and the New Opportunities Fund, both executive non-departmental public bodies, working jointly together pursuant to the administrative merger in June 2004.

Information up to 31 March 2005 is set out in the Accounts of the New Opportunities Fund, and of the Community Fund, copies of which were presented to Parliament on 31 October 2005 and 15 December 2005 respectively.

The following information has been supplied by the New Opportunities Fund and the Community Fund.
Grants where payments have been made since 1 June 2004Awards approved since 1 June 2004
New Opportunities
Fund£828.6 million£623.3 million
Community Fund£374.9 million£351.9 million

These figures exclude Awards for All and those delivered through Award Partners.

The New Opportunities Fund and the Community Fund working together as the Big Lottery Fund have made 24,560 awards since June 2004.


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