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Crime: Offences Brought to Justice

Baroness Stern asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Scotland of Asthal): The information available for England and Wales is presented in the table.

It is not possible to break down the figures for offences taken into consideration and warnings for cannabis possession by the age of the offender. Prosecution and court appearance figures are not components of the offences brought to justice measure.

Information for Scotland is the responsibility of the Scottish Executive and information for Northern Ireland is the responsibility of the Northern Ireland Office.

Number of offences brought to justice in England and Wales, 2001-05 by type of disposal and age group 1 (thousand of offences)
Aged 10 to 17
Penalty Notices for DisorderReprimandWarningConvicted

2001

-

72.5

36.8

113.8

2002

-

61.5

32.6

110.9

2003

-

63.9

35.1

108.3

2004

-

74.3

41.0

114.8

2005

1.3

88.0

41.7

118.3

Aged 18 and over
Penalty Notices for DisorderCautionsConvicted

2001

-

122.0

565.2

2002

1.0

128.8

596.9

2003

3.4

139.2

614.7

2004

30.3

146.3

592.1

2005

97.6

182.3

579.4



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All ages 2
Offences taken into consideration 3Penalty notices for disorderFormal warnings for cannabis possession 3Cautions, reprimands and final warningsConvictedTotal offences brought to justice

2001

88.0

231.5

681.9

1,001.3

2002

99.3

1.0

223.2

707.7

1,031.2

2003

94.6

3.4

238.2

723.4

1,059.7

2004

104.5

30.3

27.5

264.2

707.2

1,133.7

2005

114.1

98.8

57.7

312.1

697.6

1,280.5

1 Figures presented are counts of offences rather than defendants.
2 The “all ages” figures for cautions and convictions include estimates for missing data not included in the figures broken down by age.
3 Figures for offences taken into consideration and formal warnings for cannabis possession cannot be broken down by age.
Note: Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the police forces and courts. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Crime: Rape

Lord Campbell-Savours asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Scotland of Asthal): If an offence of rape is “no crimed” then that is reported monthly on the recorded crime return made to the Home Office. However, offences which have been “no crimed” do not feature in the recorded crime statistics published by the Home Office.

Once any offence has been recorded, it should be classified as a “no crime” only if one of the following criteria is satisfied: the crime was committed outside the jurisdiction of the police force in which it was recorded; where following the report of an incident which has subsequently been recorded as a crime, additional verifiable information is available which determines that no notifiable crime has been committed; if the crime, as alleged, constitutes part of a crime already recorded; if the reported incident was recorded as a crime in error.

Further explanation of the “no crime” principle is contained in Section C of the Home Office Counting Rules for Recorded Crime. A copy of the rules is available at www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs06/count general06.pdf.

Lord Campbell-Savours asked Her Majesty's Government:

Baroness Scotland of Asthal: Such statistics are not collected as part of the recorded crime series and there are currently no plans to do.

While there can be problems in ascertaining the number of false reports for any crime reported to the police, there is no evidence to suggest that a significant number of false allegations of rape are being made. Home Office Research Study 293, A Gap or a Chasm? Attrition in Reported Rape Cases published in 2005, which aimed to explore the issue of attrition in rape cases, also looked into the issue of false allegations. In-depth analysis of case files as part of the study indicated that approximately 3 per cent of cases reported to the police were false allegations. None of these cases got beyond the investigative stage of the criminal justice process. A copy of the research study is available at www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs05/hors293.pdf.

Lord Campbell-Savours asked Her Majesty's Government:

Baroness Scotland of Asthal: I understand that the Criminal Cases Review Commission is unaware that it has dealt with any cases where DNA samples have been obtained from the alleged rape victim as part of the commission's investigation. A sample may, however, have been taken by the original investigators for elimination purposes.

Demonstrations: “Sack Parliament”

Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Scotland of Asthal): I understand from the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis that the estimated total policing cost was £298,000. Of this, £221,000 was for opportunity costs and £77,000 for additional policing costs.

Elections: Review of Systems

Lord Tyler asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Constitutional Affairs (Baroness Ashton of Upholland): The Government review of the experiences of the new UK voting systems introduced for the devolved administrations, the European Parliament and London Assembly elections, which is being conducted by officials within the DCA, is under way. Any decisions on any next steps, if necessary, will be taken in due course.



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Environment: Aarhus Convention

Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Minister of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord Rooker): The Aarhus convention sets out a range of obligations on access to information, public participation and access to justice in environmental matters. The list of ratifications, including those of the European Community and its member states, is at www.unece.org/env/pp/ctreaty.htm.

When the UK ratified the convention in February 2005, the Government published a detailed explanation of how they considered the EU and the UK complied with these obligations at the time, including under requirements imposed under common Community measures. This information can be found at www.defra.gov.uk/environment/internat/aarhus/pdf/compliance-summary.pdf.


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