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The London Organising Committee for the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) and its partners are developing the vision and business plan for each project, which will include consideration of the number of people likely to participate as performers, artists and spectators.

Baroness Bonham-Carter of Yarnbury asked Her Majesty’s Government:

Lord Davies of Oldham: The Culture and Creativity Advisory Forum is regularly attended by representatives of the Local Government Association and the devolved Administrations. DCMS officials have held a number of discussions with other government departments about the interaction between the Cultural Olympiad and other parts of the Olympic programme, and will continue to do so as appropriate.

Elections: Campaigning

Lord Greaves asked Her Majesty’s Government:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord Hunt of Kings Heath): Outside an election campaign period, the Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Act 2000 (PPERA) requires central parties and accounting units (constituency associations)

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to submit annual statements of accounts detailing income and expenditure to the Electoral Commission.

The format and content of these statements vary according to the total income or gross expenditure incurred by that accounting unit. PPERA does not, however, require internal transfers between a central party and an accounting unit to be reported as in-kind donations.

Equality: Complainant Aid Services

Lord Ouseley asked Her Majesty’s Government:

The Lord President of the Council (Baroness Ashton of Upholland): Section 28 of the Equality Act 2006 gives the Equality and Human Rights Commission (the commission) the power to provide advice, assistance and representation to an individual who alleges that he or she has been a victim of behaviour contrary to a provision of the “equality enactments”. The “equality enactments” include all the main provisions outlawing discrimination.

On 1 October, the commission inherited from its three legacy commissions all the legal casework where advice, assistance or representation was being provided. The commission also committed to continue supporting the funding programmes inherited from its legacy commissions for voluntary and community sector organisations for 2007-08, including law centres providing legal advice and support to victims of discrimination. In this year, the funding programme amounts to £3,159,056. The commission is still in discussions on the exact level of funding that it will render to complainant aid services.

In addition to the legal staff based in England, Scotland and Wales who have come from the three legacy commissions, the commission will build up its complement of staff in the legal directorate during the next few months to over 60 full-time equivalents. These staff will carry out three functions: legal policy, enforcement and casework and litigation (advice, assistance and representation). In addition, the commission’s legal budget gives staff from the legal directorate the flexibility to buy in external legal services where necessary. The commission will continue to take on individual strategically important legal cases.

The commission’s funding and support services are only a small part of the total funding needed to support equality and human rights advice. Through its country and regional offices, the commission is in discussion with advice agencies and other funders on how best to work together to ensure not only that the equality and human rights advice sector is properly funded but that the funding is properly co-ordinated.



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Equality: Discrimination Law Review

Lord Ouseley asked Her Majesty’s Government:

The Lord President of the Council (Baroness Ashton of Upholland): The responses to the consultation on proposals for a new equality Bill are currently being considered. We remain committed to introducing the Act during this Parliament.

Equality: Race Equality Councils

Lord Ouseley asked Her Majesty’s Government:

The Lord President of the Council (Baroness Ashton of Upholland): The Equality and Human Rights Commission (the commission) has taken over responsibility for managing grants that have previously been made under Section 44 of the Race Relations Act 1976. Current grants have been made until March 2008. The 2008-09 funding cycle will be an interim year while the commission develops an appropriate, fit-for-purpose grants programme to take effect beyond 2008-09 and to reflect the priorities of the commission.

Section 17 of the Equality Act 2006 is an extension of Section 44 of the Race Relations Act 1976 but also increases the types of organisation that can apply for funding. It is expected that under normal circumstances all the organisations currently in receipt of funding under Section 44 of the Race Relations Act 1976 will be eligible to apply for funding from the commission under Section 17. As long as the race equality council meets the new funding programme requirements and, where applicable, it has met the evaluation and monitoring requirements of its current contracts, it would be able to apply for funding beyond 2008-09.

Race equality councils are extremely important partners for the commission. The commission is working closely with them as well as other organisations in the voluntary and community sector to develop a full funding programme to meet the challenges of the future.

EU: Reform Treaty

Lord Stoddart of Swindon asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Lord President of the Council (Baroness Ashton of Upholland): During an interview on the Radio 4 “Today” programme on 20 October, the President of the European Commission, Mr José Manuel Barroso, stated:



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When asked to clarify the words “for the time being”, Mr Barroso asserted:

As my right honourable friend the Prime Minister stated on 8 October:

The document has been placed in the Libraries of both Houses and sets out how the Government’s red lines are protected in the draft reform treaty, with commentary explaining each provision in detail.

Lord Stoddart of Swindon asked Her Majesty’s Government:

Baroness Ashton of Upholland: All institutional change in the EU requires the support of all 27 member states. As my right honourable friend the Prime Minister said in his post-European Council Statement on 22 October in another place:

Lord Elton asked Her Majesty’s Government:

Baroness Ashton of Upholland: As has been the practice with previous EU amending treaties, such as Maastricht, Amsterdam and Nice, the Government will publish a Bill giving effect to the treaty in UK law. Parliament can vote to amend this Bill, although some of the Bill’s provisions will be necessary for the UK to ratify the treaty. All treaties are made and ratified under royal prerogative. As has always been the case, Parliament cannot unilaterally amend any treaty, which in this case will have 26 other signatories besides the UK.

Lord Roberts of Conwy asked Her Majesty’s Government:

Baroness Ashton of Upholland: All intergovernmental conference papers, including draft versions of the EU reform treaty, have been placed in the Library of the

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House. The latest text, which has been prepared for discussion in the Jurists-Linguists technical translation group from 12 to 16 November, was circulated to Parliament on 31 October. We will continue to forward any further draft texts to Parliament as soon as we receive them.

We expect to lay the final EU reform treaty before Parliament shortly after formal signature by Heads of State and Government at the 13 December meeting.

European Union Committee

Lord Trefgarne asked the Chairman of Committees:

The Chairman of Committees (Lord Brabazon of Tara): There is no record of any name submitted to the Committee of Selection in respect of membership of the European Union Committee being rejected in the last 10 years.

Iraq and Afghanistan: Troop Deployments

Lord Campbell-Savours asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence (Baroness Taylor of Bolton): The Chief of the General Staff, as a member of the Chiefs of Staff Committee, regularly discusses such matters with the other single service Chiefs of Staff and with the Chief of the Defence Staff. Decisions on the military force deployed on operations in Iraq and in Afghanistan are based on military advice from the Chiefs of Staff and commanders on the ground.

Ministry of Defence: Manpower Capitation Rates

Lord Astor of Hever asked Her Majesty's Government:



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The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence (Baroness Taylor of Bolton): No. I am withholding the information as its release would, or would be likely to, prejudice commercial interests.

Motor Insurers' Bureau

Lord Brougham and Vaux asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Bassam of Brighton: All claims made to the Motor Insurers’ Bureau are dealt with in accordance with current liability law. We are satisfied that the correct procedures are being operated by the Motor Insurers’ Bureau.

Political Parties: Funding

Lord Greaves asked Her Majesty’s Government:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord Hunt of Kings Heath): In his press release following the suspension of the interparty talks on 30 October 2007, Sir Hayden Phillips published the draft proposals that he had put to the parties in late August during the negotiations. I have placed a copy of Sir Hayden’s press release and his proposals in the Libraries of both Houses.

Schools: Healthy Schools Programme

Baroness Gould of Potternewton asked Her Majesty’s Government:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Children, Schools and Families (Lord Adonis): Funding for local programmes to deliver the national healthy schools programme from 2008-09 will move from the standards fund to the area-based grant. This will mean that funding is no longer ring-fenced, but the target of 75 per cent of schools achieving healthy school status by 2009 will still be met. PSA delivery agreement 12—improving the health and well-being of children and young people—does not include healthy schools as an indicator, but emphasises that the programme is a key delivery vehicle for promoting the physical, mental and emotional health of all children and young people.



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Schools: Learning Difficulties

Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty’s Government:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Children, Schools and Families (Lord Adonis): We have carefully considered the research and will be responding in due course to the detailed recommendations in the report. The department’s guidance Safe to Learn: Embedding Anti-bullying Work in Schools provides advice to schools on tackling bullying and flags up the bullying of children with special educational needs (SEN) and disabilities as an area that schools need to consider. We are currently working with the Council for Disabled Children to develop more specific guidance to help teachers to prevent and tackle the bullying of children with SEN and disabilities and will publish this next spring.

We have also asked the Anti-Bullying Alliance and National Strategies, which work with local authorities and schools to embed effective anti-bullying practice on the ground, to ensure that schools have robust systems in place for tackling this problem.


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