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28 Feb 2008 : Column WA129

Written Answers

Thursday 28 February 2008

Africa: Maternal Mortality

The Earl of Sandwich asked Her Majesty's Government:

Baroness Crawley: DfID's performance on reducing maternal mortality in Africa will not depend on training traditional birth attendants (TBAs) at the expense of increasing skilled birth attendants (SBAs). Evidence has shown that TBA training has little demonstrable impact on reducing maternal deaths. However, TBAs can have an important socio-cultural role. There is evidence (e.g. in Egypt) that where they are linked to the formal health system, more women benefit from skilled birth attendance.

DfID helps strengthen country health systems as a whole, including training health workers, improving the supply of drugs and commodities, infrastructure, planning and financing to ensure effective delivery of reproductive health services.

Armed Forces: Pay

Lord Selkirk of Douglas asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence (Baroness Taylor of Bolton): The total sum underpaid, the greatest single underpayment made in 2007, and the greatest single overpayment made in the same year are not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

I can confirm that all identified under and overpayments of salary that occurred during 2007 have been rectified. Any underpayments are rectified at the earliest opportunity, usually the following month. Overpayments are recovered in accordance with service

28 Feb 2008 : Column WA130

regulations. Where underpayments would result in hardship, units are able to provide interim payments to individuals.

The majority of the pay errors are due to late or incorrect human input. Error rates will reduce as familiarity with the new system grows. There is no complacency and the MoD acknowledges that all such errors should be eliminated if at all possible.

Armed Forces: Typhoon and Rafale Jets

Lord Lee of Trafford asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence (Baroness Taylor of Bolton): I refer the noble Lord to the Answer given in another place by my right honourable friend the Minister of State for the Armed Forces on 30 October 2007 (Official Report, col. 1356W).

Chad: Displaced People

Lord Avebury asked Her Majesty's Government:

Baroness Crawley: The humanitarian situation in Chad and in western Darfur remains fluid. The rapidly changing humanitarian situation means that the Department for International Development (DfID) is urgently reviewing its funding commitments.

In the financial year 2007-08, the UK Government have committed £6.5 million to Chad through humanitarian agencies. Within these DfID contributions it is difficult to isolate specific support to the internally displaced person population (IDP), as agencies tend to target their interventions to support IDPs, the hosting community and the neighbouring refugee population collectively.

Crime: Incitement to Hatred

Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty's Government:



28 Feb 2008 : Column WA131

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord Hunt of Kings Heath): My honourable friend the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Maria Eagle met with representatives from the United Kingdom Disabled People's Council on 4 February. It was a useful meeting where members of the council expressed their views and provided a paper. The Government are concerned to tackle crimes against disabled people. We have not yet seen compelling evidence that there is a gap in the law. But we will continue to consider this carefully.

Crime: Northern Ireland

Lord Laird asked Her Majesty's Government:



28 Feb 2008 : Column WA132

Lord Rooker: The information is not available in the format requested. Court prosecution and conviction datasets do not contain any background information in relation to an offence, therefore it is not possible to separately identify offences such as assault in which alcohol has been a contributory factor. It is only possible to provide information for those offences which, by their definition, refer to alcohol.

The following table gives the number prosecuted and number subsequently convicted for drink-driving, simple drunk, licensing offences and other alcohol-related offences.

Data cover the calendar years 2002 to 2006 (the latest available years) and are collated on the principal offence rule; so only the most serious offence with which an offender is charged is included.

Number prosecuted and convicted for alcohol-related offences 2002-061:

20022003
ProsecutedConvictedProsecutedConvicted

Drink-driving

2,342

2,248

2,662

2,562

Causing death/grievous bodily injury by drink-driving

2

2

5

5

Simple drunk

39

32

35

29

Licensing offences

57

47

75

56

Other alcohol- related offences2

1

1

1

1

Total

2,441

2,330

2,778

2,653

20042005
ProsecutedConvictedProsecutedConvicted

Drink-driving

2,762

2,674

2,900

2,801

Causing death/grievous bodily injury by drink-driving

2

2

4

4

Simple drunk

40

37

41

40

Licensing offences

107

78

85

60

Other alcohol- related offences2

4

3

2

2

Total

2,915

2,794

3,032

2,907

2006
ProsecutedConvicted

Drink-driving

2,936

2,799

Causing death/grievous bodily injury by drink-driving

6

6

Simple drunk

49

48

Licensing offences

94

77

Other alcohol-related offences2

2

2

Total

3,087

2,932


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