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Paveway II (Laser), Enhanced Paveway II (Laser/GPS) and Enhanced Paveway II+ (Laser/GPS) 1,000 lb precision-guided bomb

Paveway III (Laser) and Enhanced Paveway III (Laser/GPS) 2,000 lb precision-guided bomb

Brimstone air-launched anti-armour weapon

Air-Launched Anti-Radiation Missile (ALARM), a medium-range anti-radar missile

Anti-Ship and/or anti-submarine

Harpoon long-range anti-ship missile

Sting Ray Mod 1 lightweight anti-submarine torpedo Spearfish heavyweight anti-ship and anti-submarine torpedo Sea Skua short-range anti-ship missile

Surface-to-Surface

Guided Multi-Launch Rocket System (GMLRS) unitary missile

Javelin Light Forces Anti-Tank Guided Weapon (LF ATGW), a man-portable medium-range anti-armour missile

Tomahawk Land-Attack Missile (TLAM), a land-attack capability against high-value non-hardened facilities in heavily defended areas

In addition to the above, the UK’s strategic deterrent, currently provided by the Trident missile system, is also a complex weapon.

I am withholding details of certain in-service complex weapons systems as their release would, or would be likely to, prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of the Armed Forces.

Lord Astor of Hever asked Her Majesty's Government:

Baroness Taylor of Bolton: Yes. At present Team CW covers only those requirements set out in the Ministerial Statement of 15 July 2008 (Official Report, Commons, col. 10WS). The Team CW concept has the potential to fulfil a wide range of our future complex weapons requirements and this will continue to be explored as we move through the project assessment phase. Nevertheless there are likely to be certain requirements, such as those usually obtained from specialist suppliers, for example, torpedoes and sensor-fuzed munitions that will continue to fall outside of its scope.



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Armed Forces: Eurofighter

Lord Moonie asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office & Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (Lord Jones of Birmingham): BAE Systems is the lead company for the campaign in Japan (supported by Alenia of Italy). BAE Systems is also leading on the marketing for a number of other prospects which have not yet reached the level of active campaigns. The UK Government through UKTI DSO are actively involved in supporting all these marketing efforts.

Armed Forces: Garrisons

Lord Lee of Trafford asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence (Baroness Taylor of Bolton): The Army aspires to quartering the majority of its units in fewer, bigger and better garrisons over the coming decades. Development of this approach is continuing with a range of possible options being considered. The location of such garrisons has not yet been decided.

Armed Forces: Germany

Lord Lee of Trafford asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence (Baroness Taylor of Bolton): With the continued agreement of the German Federal Government, the United Kingdom Ministry of Defence (UK MoD) intends to maintain a significant presence in Germany for the foreseeable future. While it is not possible to confirm exactly how many Armed Forces personnel will be based there over the next 22 years, it is anticipated that around 15,000 will remain following the return to the UK: of 4 Mechanised Brigade (which is nearing completion); the Headquarters of the NATO Rapid Reaction Corps in 2010; 1 Signal Brigade and 102 Logistic Brigade (the precise timings for these moves have yet to be determined).

The estate is made available by the German Federal Government under Article 48 of the Supplementary Agreement to the NATO Status of Forces Agreement. Where estate or accommodation is no longer required,

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it will be released to the appropriate German authorities. The estate used by the British Forces in Germany is not owned by the UK MoD and it is therefore not appropriate for me to speculate on the value of the land and buildings which may be surplus to requirements.

Armed Forces: Iraq

Lord Astor of Hever asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence (Baroness Taylor of Bolton): Records suggest that the Royal Military Police have conducted in the region of 400 investigations into incidents involving members of the Armed Forces in Iraq. This figure excludes investigations where Armed Forces personnel are the alleged victims and includes a broad range of incidents from road traffic accidents to more serious allegations.

Information on the current status of these investigations, how many individuals were under investigation in each case and how many of the investigations have and have not led to prosecutions is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Lord Astor of Hever asked Her Majesty's Government:

Baroness Taylor of Bolton: It is mandatory for commanding officers to report without delay to the Royal Military Police all crimes in which service personnel or service interests are involved or suspected to be involved. It is also mandatory for serious incidents to be investigated by the Royal Military Police. I am not prepared to speculate on any investigations that the Royal Military Police may conduct in future.

Armed Forces: Royal Marines

Lord Lee of Trafford asked Her Majesty's Government:



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The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence (Baroness Taylor of Bolton): The strategic requirements for basing all Royal Marines units are routinely reviewed to ensure that the most cost-effective solution which contributes to 3 Commando Brigade's operational capability is being followed.

There are no current plans to move 45 Commando to the south-west; a recent review recommended that the balance of advantage for 45 Commando Royal Marines lies with its current base at Arbroath, which is considered fit for purpose.

Childcare: Ofsted Report

Lord Steinberg asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Children, Schools and Families (Lord Adonis): Ofsted published its annual report on the quality of early-years and childcare provision, Leading to Excellence, on 27 August 2008. The report showed that almost all settings (97 per cent) inspected during the three-year period to March 2008 were satisfactory or better and 3 per cent (which includes the 143 London childcare settings) were judged inadequate. The role of Ofsted is to inspect providers and, where they are found inadequate, to set out a plan of action to improve, carry out monitoring visits and/or reinspect to make sure action is being taken. By the next inspection almost all have improved.

In support, the Government introduced: a statutory duty on local authorities in October 2007 to support registered providers to improve the quality of their provision; from 1 September, the early-years foundation stage—which sets a single statutory national framework for standards of quality and safety parents are entitled to expect from childcare providers; and legislation requiring all childcare providers to inform parents if they are judged “inadequate”.

Civil Partnerships

Lord Lester of Herne Hill asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Lord President of the Council (Baroness Ashton of Upholland): We are proud of our legislation introducing civil partnerships for same-sex couples and we encourage other countries to do likewise. Many types of same-sex relationship formalised in other EU countries are recognised as equivalent to civil partnerships in the United Kingdom. These include those registered in Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Luxemburg, the Netherlands and Spain.



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We encourage other member states to recognise UK-registered civil partnerships. However, the terms under which same-sex relationships are legally recognised is ultimately a domestic policy matter and is therefore for each member state to determine for itself.

Climate Change: Carbon Dioxide Emissions

Lord Berkeley asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Minister of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord Rooker): A recent report, funded by Defra, estimated that between 1992 and 2004 worldwide carbon dioxide emissions associated with UK consumption of goods and services (including international transportation) rose by about 115 million tonnes, or roughly 18 per cent, from about 647 million tonnes in 1992 to about 762 million tonnes in 2004. This has resulted chiefly from an increase in the total volume and diversity of products and services being consumed, and from a movement of manufacturing from the UK to countries where manufacturing is more carbon-intensive.

As agreed internationally at UN level, the UK reports on, and is responsible for, greenhouse gas emissions occurring within its territory. By this measure, UK emissions of all greenhouse gases fell by roughly 16 per cent between 1990 and 2006 and carbon dioxide emissions fell by about 6 cent.

The UK has no direct influence over emissions occurring beyond its territory, and cutting trade with more carbon-intensive (often poorer) economies would have serious, mutual impacts on economic growth.

Cluster Munitions

Lord Elton asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office & Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (Lord Jones of Birmingham): Cluster munitions are currently controlled under entries ML3 and ML4 of Part I of Schedule 1 to the Export of Goods, Transfer of Technology and Provision of Technical Assistance (Control) Order 2003 (“The Military List”) and therefore cannot be exported from the UK without a licence granted by the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (BERR).



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I would like to clarify the Government’s commitments in this area: at the recent Dublin conference, the UK was one of over 100 states which agreed to adopt the text of the new Convention on Cluster Munitions. That convention has yet to be ratified, but will include a ban. Until that ban is in place, any application to export cluster munitions from the UK would be rigorously assessed against the Consolidated EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria, which cover, among other things, exports which would be used in the perpetration of human rights abuses or would exacerbate regional or internal conflicts in the destination country; and would be refused if any of these criteria were breached. As the noble Lord will be aware, the convention does however permit the transfer of cluster munitions between states party to the convention for the purposes of destruction, and for the development of and training in cluster munition and explosive submunition detection, clearance or destruction techniques; or the development of cluster munition counter measures. My understanding is, however, that no cluster munitions are produced in the UK, therefore it is unlikely that an application to export will arise in practice.

Lord Elton asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office & Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (Lord Jones of Birmingham): No cluster munitions have been exported or licensed or approved for export from the UK since 30 May 2008.

Crime: Knives

Lord Maginnis of Drumglass asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord West of Spithead): The Written Answer given to Lord Maginnis of Drumglass on 22 July (WA 241) stated that there is no proposal that offenders who have committed violence involving knives should visit victims in hospital. My right honourable friend the Home Secretary's statement in the House of Commons on 14 July confirmed that we are not proposing to bring young people into wards to see patients (col. 17). Our position remains the same.



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