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Non-consolidated performance-related pay awards paid to Home Office SCS staff.

1 Non-consolidated performance-related pay awards paid in 2008 for financial year 2007-08, breakdown by Pay Band and Award Type
Top ExceptionalTop HighMiddle HighMiddle Standard
NumberTotal AmountNumberTotal AmountNumberTotal AmountNumberTotal Amount

PB1

8

£128,000.00

17

£187,000.00

19

£153,000.00

37

£222,000.00

PB2

2

£44,000.00

7

£119,000.00

15

£167,000.00

15

£125,000.00

PB3

2

£40,000.00

1

£17,000.00

2

£24,000.00

2

£20,000.00

Totals

12

£212,000.00

25

£323,000.00

36

£344,000.00

54

£367,000.00

1 Non-consolidated performance-related pay awards paid in 2008 for financial year 2007-08, breakdown by Pay Band and Award Type
Total Number receiving bonuses in PBTotal Amount paid to PB

PB1

81

£690,000.00

PB2

39

£455,000.00

PB3

8

£101,000.00

Totals

127

£1,246,000.00

2 Non-consolidated performance-related pay awards paid in 2007 for financial year 2006-07, breakdown by Pay Band and Award Type
Top ExceptionalTop HighMiddle HighMiddle Standard
NumberTotal AmountNumberTotal AmountNumberTotal AmountNumberTotal Amount

PB1

8

£123,321.00

32

£382,984.00

36

£269,500.00

33

£165,000.00

PB2

4

£80,000.00

9

£134,154.00

13

£152,000.00

12

£76,000.00

PB3

4

£54,000.00

6

£76,250.00

Totals

12

£203,321.00

45

£571,138.00

49

£421,500.00

51

£317,250.00

2 Non-consolidated performance-related pay awards paid in 2007 for financial year 2006-07, breakdown by Pay Band and Award Type
Total Number receiving bonuses in PBTotal amount

PB1

109

£940,805.00

PB2

38

£442,154.00

PB3

10

£130,250.00

Totals

157

£1,513,209.00

Civil Service: Redundancy

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Lord Young of Norwood Green): The statutory cost of a redundancy payment in the private sector for an individual earning £25,000 aged 50 with 15 years' service is £6,650.



24 Jun 2009 : Column WA285

I refer the noble Lord to the reply that Lord Patel gave him on 2 June 2009 (Official Report, col. WA 67).

Constitutional Renewal Bill

Question

Asked by Lord Lester of Herne Hill

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord Bach): I replied to the noble Lord’s Question on 18 June (Official Report, cols. WA 221-22). While proposals for a Parliamentary Standards Authority are being worked up, the planning of parliamentary business remains subject to change. These circumstances, and a desire to give the noble Lord as accurate an answer as possible, have led to a delay in responding to the previous Question.

Credit Cards

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Lord Young of Norwood Green): Industry best practice guidance requires lenders to state clearly the payment due date in statements. This does not currently specify the size of the text. The Government expect all lenders to be sensitive to the needs of customers with particular needs, such as the visually impaired, and make appropriate adjustments.

Crime: Drugs and Guns

Question

Asked by Baroness Warsi

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord West of Spithead): The information requested is not collected centrally.

Elections

Question

Asked by Lord Dykes



24 Jun 2009 : Column WA286

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord Bach): In his Statement to the House on 10 June, the Prime Minister confirmed that the Government will be setting out proposals for taking the debate forward. The Government believe that any move towards electoral reform should be led by our engagement with the public. There are a variety of views about which electoral system is best, but all have their advantages and disadvantages. This Government have introduced new voting systems for the devolved Administrations, the European Parliament and the London mayoral and Assembly elections. The voting systems review, published by the Government last year, outlines the experience of these systems and contributes to and informs the continuing debate on this issue.

Elections: European Parliament

Question

Asked by Lord Greaves

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord Bach): Once the local returning officer is satisfied that the number of votes for each registered party and individual candidate is accurate, he can proceed to announce the provisional result for the local counting area. Once this has taken place, the following people have the right under Rule 54 of the European parliamentary election rules, to ask the local returning officer for a recount:

candidates on a party list;an individual candidate;an election agent of a party or an individual candidate; anda counting agent of each registered party or individual candidate who is specifically authorised to ask for a recount.

Under Rule 54(1) of the European parliamentary election rules, the local returning officer is required to consider any request for a recount but may refuse if in their opinion a recount is unreasonable. If a recount is granted, the local returning officer is required to conduct the count under the same procedure as the original count. The Electoral Commission has issued guidance on the procedure which local returning officers should follow for recounts. This includes advising local returning officers to consult the regional returning officer if a recount is required. There is no statutory provision for recounts to take place at regional levels. Under the terms of Section 5 of the Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Act 2000, the Electoral Commission must prepare and publish a report on the administration of European parliamentary elections in the UK. The Government will consider the findings of the Commission's report.



24 Jun 2009 : Column WA287

Employment: Discrimination

Question

Asked by Lord Dykes

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Communities and Local Government & Department for Work and Pensions (Lord McKenzie of Luton): The Government's strategy was set out in the Welfare Reform White Paper Raising Expectations and Increasing Support: Reforming Welfare for the Future. The Government conducted a series of expert employer panel events from July 2008 to March 2009. These events gave committed employers the opportunity to share barriers they face in recruiting and retaining disabled people, and current good practice that helps to overcome these barriers, and to discuss how we might put into place further initiatives and good practice ideas that could work for them and, potentially, for other employers.

Specifically, we work with local employer partnerships to ensure disabled people and those with long-term health problems are considered by employers, we are working with national employers—both in the public and private sectors—to encourage a positive attitude towards these customers and we work closely with the Employers' Forum on Disability to encourage best practice among employers.

Gangmasters

Question

Asked by Lord Burnett

Lord Davies of Oldham: It is difficult to give an accurate estimate of the amount of tax and other penalties recovered by HM Revenue and Customs as a result of the Gangmasters Licensing Authority's (GLA) activities. However, during the licensing scheme's first year of operation (April 2006 to March 2007) the GLA has estimated that approximately 40 gangmasters who had not previously been registered for VAT did so in order to comply with the GLA licensing standards1.


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