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The Government do not publish forecast financial data for the companies that they own. Nor do they publicly state the value expected to be received from an asset that may be for sale, as it could have a negative impact on the proceeds received.

Schools: Primary Curriculum

Question

Asked by Baroness Coussins



26 Oct 2009 : Column WA108

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Children, Schools and Families (Baroness Morgan of Drefelin): The level of funding this year and in the past five years is set out in the table below. We have given increased funding through local authorities via the Standards Fund to support the teaching of languages in primary schools-£32.5 million in 2009-10. Schools can use this for a variety of purposes, including paying for in-service training for teachers and teaching assistants.

In addition, the Government have provided funding to the Training and Development Agency for Schools for a primary initial teacher training (ITT) course in a languages specialism and, more recently, for additional training routes to increase the language qualification levels of the primary workforce; to CILT, the National Centre for Languages, to run training courses for local authority staff and schools on practical classroom activities, teaching practice and methodology; and to the British Council to run the Primary Teacher Project, through which primary teachers undertake a two-week programme of language tuition through a partner school in Europe, to develop their confidence and linguistic competence.

Standards FundTDA Primary ITT course in a languages specialismTDA additional training routesCILT training coursesBritish Council2 week primary teacher project

2009-10

£32,500,000

1,550,000

124,735

1,154,279

287,970

2008-09

£32,500,000

1,334,460

160,800 (first year)

1,776,000

272,742

2007-08

£27,500,000

1,528,762

1,385,720

255,000

2006-07

£21,986,000

£1,221,449

1,682,300

345,590 (first year ran from Jan 06 to Mar 07)

2005-06

4,992,000 (first year)

£914,880

450,000

2004-05

£547,000

350,000

Shipping: Ferry Operators

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

The Secretary of State for Transport (Lord Adonis): Marine surveyors from the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) examined the international safety management (ISM) code safety management certificate (SMC), ISM document of compliance (DOC), UK load line (UKLL) certificate and DOC dangerous goods (DG) certificate during the inspection carried

26 Oct 2009 : Column WA109

out on 12 September 2008 on the MV "Canna". The MV "Canna's" previous passenger certificate was also examined prior to issuing the new short-term passenger certificate. However, the administrative error (as set out in my Answer of 17 June (Official Report, cols. WA 216-17) was. not detected on 12 September.

The short-term passenger certificate for the MV "Canna" was issued on 12 September 2008 because the MV "Canna's" operator was unable to arrange the passenger vessel's annual survey before 18 September; the date which the operator and the MCA surveyor both incorrectly believed was the end of the annual survey range date for the MV "Canna".

The new short-term passenger certificate covered the period 12 September to 12 October 2008.

Shipping: Pollution

Questions

Asked by Lord Condon

The Secretary of State for Transport (Lord Adonis): While we have not seen the Government of Denmark's Environmental Agency research, the impact on human health of pollutant emissions from shipping has been the subject of other studies in recent years, and both the distance which such emissions can travel and the harmful effects of these emissions are well known.

Moreover, the Government already undertake a significant amount of research into airborne pollutants from both shipping and other sources, including research undertaken in the production of the national air emissions inventory and the research which the Maritime and Coastguard Agency commissioned this year on the impacts of the revised annexe VI of the MARPOL convention.

The Government are therefore not convinced of the need for additional extensive research on this issue.

The Government have taken, and are continuing to take, action to address pollutant emissions from ships, both in the International Maritime Organization (where we played a prominent role in the revision of annexe VI to the MARPOL convention which will significantly reduce pollutant emissions from ships and improve air quality in our coastal regions) and in the European Union (where we are currently implementing Directive 2005/33/EC on the sulphur content of marine fuels).



26 Oct 2009 : Column WA110

St Andrews Agreement

Questions

Asked by Lord Laird

Baroness Royall of Blaisdon: As stated at paragraph 2 of the St Andrews agreement, the issues which required resolution at St Andrews included support for and the devolution of policing and criminal justice, changes to the operation of the Good Friday agreement institutions and certain other matters raised by the parties or flowing from the preparation for government committee. These included issues relating to human rights, equality and victims and the financial package for the newly restored executive.

Asked by Lord Laird

Baroness Royall of Blaisdon: The St Andrews agreement did not contain any agreement about such a motorway.

Turks and Caicos Islands

Question

Asked by Lord Jones of Cheltenham

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Baroness Kinnock of Holyhead): I refer the noble Lord to the Written Ministerial Statement made by my honourable friend the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, Chris Bryant, on 12 October 2009 (Official Report, col. WS 14).

The special investigation and prosecution team have presented their initial scoping project to the governor. No charges have yet been brought against any individuals mentioned in the commission of inquiry's report.

Ulster-Scots

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

Baroness Royall of Blaisdon: I have nothing further to add to my previous Answer of 13 October 2009 (Official Report, col. WA 24).

Vehicles: Carbon Emissions

Questions

Asked by Lord Kirkwood of Kirkhope

The Secretary of State for Transport (Lord Adonis): The EU New Car CO2 regulation, adopted in April 2009, sets sales-weighted, fleet average CO2 targets for car manufacturers at the EU level. The regulation requires manufacturers failing to meet their targets to pay an excess emissions premium, which is designed financially to incentivise compliance.

Although not directly targeted at meeting the EU targets, the Government are taking a range of actions to support car makers, consumers and other parties in making the transition to a lower-emitting future, which will help the targets to be met. In February 2009 the Government launched the £2.3 billion automotive assistance programme, with the development of green technologies to reduce CO2 emissions as one eligibility criterion. We have made £140 million available for research, development and demonstration of new lower-emitting technologies and vehicles, through the Technology Strategy Board's low carbon vehicle innovation platform.

The Government will shortly announce details of how the £230 million consumer incentive to reduce the up-front cost of purchasing an electric or plug-in hybrid will operate. Consumers are also encouraged to purchase low-emitting vehicles through the taxation system, notably through the structures of VED, company car tax and enhanced capital allowances.

Asked by Lord Berkeley

Lord Adonis: The Written Answer of 25 June 2007 gave air quality and carbon dioxide emissions expressed as fleet average emissions in grams per kilometre, broken down by vehicle type. The Department for Transport does not hold an updated version of this information using the latest modelling assumptions.

However, an emissions factor demonstration tool, enabling users to produce similar estimates, was published as part of research on updating vehicle emissions inventory modelling assumptions, on 29 June 2009. This is available on the department's website at http://www.dft.gov.uk/pgr/roads/environment/emissions/.



26 Oct 2009 : Column WA112

Asked by Lord Berkeley

Lord Adonis: New cars are already labelled with a user-friendly, colour-coded, CO2 emissions rating in most new car showrooms. The system used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency would not be appropriate for use in the United Kingdom where, in contrast to the more complex arrangements in the United States, legislation imposes the same air pollutant emission standards on all cars using a given fuel type.

Asked by Lord Berkeley

Lord Adonis: For new passenger cars sold in the UK in 2008 the average CO2 emissions were 158g/km. This breaks down into an average of 160g/km for petrol cars and 157g/km for diesel cars (reflecting the fact that, counteracting their higher efficiency, average diesel cars are larger than average petrol cars).

Registration weighted fleet average figures for air quality emissions are not available and, unlike CO2 emissions, it is not possible to produce meaningful averages from type approval data.

Vehicles: Electric Power

Questions

Asked by Lord Kirkwood of Kirkhope

The Secretary of State for Transport (Lord Adonis): The new cross-Whitehall office for low emission vehicles (OLEV) has been established to promote the uptake and delivery of ultra-low carbon vehicles (such as plug-in hybrid and electric cars) into the UK transport mix.

£230 million will be available between 2011 and 2014 to create a consumer incentive scheme to reduce the cost of electric and plug-in hybrid cars by between £2,000 and £5,000.

Up to £30 million will be available for the plugged- in-places infrastructure framework to help regional consortia of cities, private businesses and utility companies install electric vehicle charging infrastructure to help create a UK network of electric car cities.



26 Oct 2009 : Column WA113

The Government have also provided more than £140 million for research, development and demonstration of low carbon vehicles through the Technology Strategy Board's low carbon vehicle innovation platform and the Department for Transport's low carbon vehicle public procurement programme.

Separately to this, electric vehicles (EVs) are also generously supported through the taxation systems: owners of EVs are exempt from paying vehicle excise duty and fuel duty, businesses which purchase electric and low carbon cars can claim enhanced capital allowances and people who use electric cars as their company car pay the lowest rate of benefit in kind.

Asked by Lord Laird



26 Oct 2009 : Column WA114

Lord Adonis: The new cross-Whitehall Office for low emission vehicles (OLEV) has been established to promote the uptake and delivery of ultra-low carbon vehicles (such as plug-in hybrid and electric cars) into the UK transport mix.

£230 million will be available between 2011 and 2014 to create a consumer incentive scheme to reduce the cost of electric and plug-in hybrid cars by between £2,000 and £5,000.

Up to £30 million will be available for the plugged- in-places infrastructure framework to help regional consortia of cities, private businesses and utility companies install electric vehicle charging infrastructure to help create a UK network of electric car cities.

Separately to this, electric vehicles (EVs) are also generously supported through the taxation systems: owners of EVs are exempt from paying vehicle excise duty and fuel duty, businesses which purchase electric and low carbon cars can claim enhanced capital allowances and people who use electric cars as their company car pay the lowest rate of benefit in kind.


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