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2 Mar 2010 : Column WA335

Written Answers

Tuesday 2 March 2010

Airports: Body Scanners

Questions

Asked by Lord Sheikh

The Secretary of State for Transport (Lord Adonis): The image produced does not show any distinguishing features such as hair or skin tone and it is not possible to recognise people from their facial features.

In addition extensive safeguards have been developed to ensure passengers' privacy is respected. Images are viewed remotely from the machine, and are deleted immediately after analysis. Images cannot be recovered at a later date from the machines or printed.

An interim code of practice has been produced for the initial deployment of body scanners. It is available via the Department for Transport website. It will ensure that the implementation and application of body scanners will be proportionate to privacy rights.

The department will be launching a full public consultation shortly on the interim code of practice and will consider all representations carefully before preparing a final code of practice later in the year.

Asked by Lord Sheikh

Lord Adonis: If an individual selected for scanning declines to be scanned, they will not be offered an alternative method of screening, and will not be allowed to travel. Individuals are able to request that their image is viewed by a screener of the same gender if that is their preference.

Asked by Lord Sheikh

Lord Adonis: As stated in the interim code of practice for the initial deployment of body scanners: "Passengers must not be selected on the basis of personal characteristics (ie on a basis that may constitute discrimination such as gender, age, race or ethnic origin)".

Asked by Lord Sheikh



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Lord Adonis: The Government have published an interim code of practice for the initial deployment of body scanners. It is available via the Department for Transport website. It will ensure that the implementation and application of body scanners properly respects privacy rights.

The department will be launching a full public consultation shortly on the interim code of practice and will consider all representations carefully before preparing a final code of practice later in the year.

Extensive safeguards have been developed to ensure passengers' privacy is respected. Only security-vetted and trained security staff employed by the airport will be able to view the images. Images are viewed remotely from the machine, and are deleted immediately after analysis. Images cannot be recovered at a later date from the machines. In addition individuals may request that their image is viewed by a screener of the same gender.

Asked by Lord Sheikh

Lord Adonis: In that circumstance, an alternative method of screening will not be offered and the individual will not be allowed to travel.

An interim code of practice has been produced for the initial deployment of body scanners and is available via the Department for Transport website.

The department will be launching a full public consultation shortly on the interim code of practice and will consider all representations carefully before preparing a final code of practice later in the year.

Alcohol

Questions

Asked by Lord Brooke of Alverthorpe

Lord Davies of Oldham: Since the implementation of the Licensing Act 2003, the Department for Culture, Media and Sport has been collecting alcohol, entertainment and late night refreshment statistics on an annual basis by financial year from licensing authorities in England and Wales.

Under the Licensing Act 2003, premises licences and club premises certificates are not confined to authorising the sale or supply of alcohol; they can also provide regulated entertainment and/or late night refreshment. DCMS does not collate data specifically on alcohol licences.



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The following table lists premises licences that were revoked or club premises certificates withdrawn for the financial years 2006 to 2008 following a completed review, in England and Wales.

Financial yearNo. of premises licences revoked or club premises certificates withdrawnLicensing authorities responding to the question (%)

2006-07

92

85%

2007-08

155

95%

2008-09

154

100%

Prior to the 2003 Act coming into force in 2005, statistics for liquor licensing in England and Wales were published on a triennial basis and contained statistics on liquor licences issued under the Licensing Act 1964.

During this period alcohol licensing statistics were compiled from returns submitted by magistrates' courts in England and Wales and had a reporting period of 1 July to 30 June. These data were collated by the Home Office up until 2001 and from 2004 the Department for Culture, Media and Sport had responsibility for publishing these data.

The following table lists the number of licences revoked under the 1964 Act between 1995 and 2004.

Year to 1 July to 30 JuneTotal no. of on- and off- premises licences revoked

1995

378

1998

317

2001

183

2004

354

Asked by Lord Brooke of Alverthorpe

Lord Davies of Oldham: The information requested is not held centrally by DCMS and fee income is collected by individual local licensing authorities.

The Licensing Act 2003 amalgamated the alcohol, regulated entertainment and late night refreshment licensing regimes and individual licences may cover one or more of these permissions.

Accordingly, licensing authorities are unlikely to record fee income for alcohol licences only.

The department keeps fee levels for individual licensing processes under review and before proposing or implementing any changes a full survey of actual income from licensing fees as a whole would be necessary.

Asked by Lord Brooke of Alverthorpe



2 Mar 2010 : Column WA338

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Baroness Thornton): The information requested on alcohol-related attendances in accident and emergency departments is not collected centrally.

Armed Forces: Languages

Questions

Asked by Lord Astor of Hever

The Minister for International Defence and Security (Baroness Taylor of Bolton): Both Pashto and Dari are mandated operational languages, entitling Armed Forces linguists with current language skills, confirmed by means of MoD Languages Examinations Board (MODLEB) examinations, to financial awards under the Defence Operational Languages Award Scheme (DOLAS).

DOLAS was implemented on 1 December 2009 to replace the previous Pilot Operational Languages Award Scheme (POLAS) which ran from 1 October 2005 to 30 November 2009.

Broadcasting: Impartiality

Question

Asked by Lord Tebbit

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord Davies of Oldham): All broadcasters, other than the BBC, are required to comply with Ofcom's broadcasting code, which includes requirements as to (among other matters) the fairness, accuracy and impartiality of broadcast content. The BBC is required to comply with all requirements under Ofcom's code other than those relating to accuracy and impartiality which, in the corporation's case, are subject to regulation by the BBC Trust. The BBC agreement includes a number of specific obligations relating to the accuracy and impartiality of the corporation's output.

Newspaper publishers must, of course, abide by the law, but they also sign up to a code of practice overseen by the independent Press Complaints

2 Mar 2010 : Column WA339

Commission. The editors' code of practice sets a benchmark for the standards the press is expected to maintain.

As with all lottery distributors, the UK Film Council (UKFC) is required by the National Lottery Act (s26 (1)) to comply with any directions given to them by the Secretary of State concerning the manner in which they distribute money. The statement of financial requirements requires UKFC to operate within the principles of administrative law, which include fairness, openness and transparency.

Buying Solutions

Question

Asked by Baroness Northover

The Secretary of State for Transport (Lord Adonis): The Department for Transport and its executive agencies have spent the following amounts with the firms listed over the past five years:

2004-052005-062006-072007-082008-09

Pricewaterhouse Coopers

£1,655,104

£1,810,356

£3,551,639

£3,020,304

£6,371,369

KPMG

£2,833,463

£115,374

£325,024

£1,742,309

£2,137,547

Deloitte

£2,993,838

£3,099,554

£8,295,914

£7,215,610

£3,958,835

Ernst and Young

£974,842*

£802,081

£49,071

£2,569,377

£1,096,088

Grant Thornton

£4,830

£0

£0

£21,360

£26,703

PKF

£623,658

£586,250

£614,823

£973,538

£82,630

* Figures exclude Highways Agency spend of £11,844 in 2004-05 with Cap Gemini Ernst and Young Plc.

There are no records of spend with BDO Stoy Hayward, Baker Tilly, Smith and Williamson, Tenon Group, McKinsey and Accenture.

There are no records held for the Maritime and Coastguard Agency for 2004-05 and 2005-06.

For DVLA, figures exclude expenditure for the implementation of the shared services centre.

Contracts are managed by designated contract managers in accordance to the department's procedures which includes monitoring and measuring supplier performance in line with the specification, service levels/key performance indicators and the terms and conditions of the contract. The procedures for monitoring a contract would depend on the nature of that contract. However, all contracts would make some provision for regular review meetings with a supplier to raise, discuss or escalate any performance issues.



2 Mar 2010 : Column WA340


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