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12 July 2010 : Column WA87



12 July 2010 : Column WA87

Written Answers

Monday 12 July 2010

Alston Healthcare

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The Department of Health monitors these grants according to standard procedures drawn up in consultation with HM Treasury.

Measures include the scrutiny of annual audited accounts and receipted invoices.

Asylum Seekers

Question

Asked by Lord Hylton

The Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Neville-Jones): The UK Border Agency is aware of the work of the Centre for the Study of Emotion and Law and that it has published a number of reports, most recently The Psychology of Seeking Protection in 2009. This report focused on existing psychological models that might be of relevance to the proceedings of refugee law and asylum decision-making.

This report will not lead directly to any rules changes concerning victims of torture or sexual abuse within the asylum system being made by UKBA since it was, on the centre's own admission, tentative and pending further research. UKBA nevertheless remains open to suggestions for improvements.

Aviation: Per-plane Duty

Question

Asked by Lord Laird



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The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Sassoon): Treasury Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the process of policy development and delivery. As was the case with previous Administrations, it is not the Government's practice to provide details of all such meetings.

Bank of England

Question

Asked by Lord Myners

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Sassoon): The Bank of England has a Financial Stability Executive Board. This is a working level committee, chaired by the Deputy Governor for Financial Stability (Paul Tucker). The Governor may attend meetings. The Financial Stability Committee was established by the Banking Act 2009 as a committee of the Court of the Bank and, by statute, is chaired by the Governor. The Governor is not a member of the Financial Stability Board established by the G20; the Deputy Governor for Financial Stability attends this committee.

Banking: Iceland

Question

Asked by Lord Myners

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Sassoon): The effect that Iceland's Supreme Court judgment (dated 16 June 2010) has on the claims that UK institutions and creditors have in relation to Icelandic banks is still being examined by the authorities in Iceland. The relevant authorities will advise creditors in due course of the impact, if any, on projected recoveries from the estates of the failed Icelandic banks.

Banks

Question

Asked by Lord Myners



12 July 2010 : Column WA89

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Sassoon): Treasury Ministers and officials have discussions with a wide variety of organisations-including banks, investment banks and banking trade associations-as part of the process of policy development and delivery.

As was the case with previous Administrations, it is not the Government's practice to provide details of all such discussions.

Community Broadband Network Ltd

Questions

Asked by Lord Laird

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Baroness Wilcox): For simplicity I will place in the Library of the House all documents released in that Freedom of Information case 10/1065 on 18 June 2010.

As regards the other questions, it is an established convention that Ministers of one Administration cannot see the documents of a previous Administration. I have nothing further to add to my previous Answers provided at Hansard 15 June 2010 (col. WA104), 15 June 2010 (col. WA 105).

Asked by Lord Laird

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord Henley): The Countryside Agency was abolished in 2006. It became readily apparent that ex-Countryside Agency records could take considerable time and resources to access and search. Additionally, the detailed information requested would require extensive input from the Community Broadband Network (CBN). We have now established a contact within the CBN who has

12 July 2010 : Column WA90

been able to provide the information within cost. The answers, based entirely on Defra's own records of its contractual arrangements with CBN and their advice, are as follows:

What measures were in place to verify the £30,000 and £42,500 paid by the Countryside Agency and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs respectively to Community Broadband Network Ltd (CBN Ltd) in 2004 and 2005 to support a mentoring scheme for local broadband projects?Defra and the Countryside Agency received regular monitoring reports from Ruralnet Ltd and CBN Ltd in relation to the community broadband mentoring and support scheme, covering both activities and expenditure.To whom those moneys were allocated by CBN Ltd?The scheme providing mentoring, online expert help and other support activities was initially run by Ruralnet UK. A team of 34 mentors was recruited and moneys were allocated following acceptance of reports on mentoring visits. Ruralnet is no longer in existence, so further details are no longer available.How many mentor man days were provided by CBN Ltd, giving the costs in each instance?Ruralnet and CBN provided 58 mentor-days, dealt with 38 experts' online requests and provided 83 training places. Further breakdown of costs is not available.How the £8,000 paid by the Countryside Agency to CBN Ltd to support part of the development of the CBN website was allocated.Funds for website development were allocated as part of a contract for services to Lindsey Annison, an independent contractor.What tendering process was employed by CBN Ltd for the website development?Website development was not tendered separately from other services.Whether they will place all details and audit reports on those grants in the Library of the House?No audit reports were undertaken by Defra. CBN's audited accounts are lodged with the Financial Services Authority. We will arrange for copies of information to be placed in the Library of the House.

Asked by Lord Laird



12 July 2010 : Column WA91

Baroness Wilcox: The Government have no plans to investigate. Any evidence of wrongdoing should be presented to the appropriate authorities.

The FSA's role under the Industrial and Provident Societies Act 1965 (the 1965 Act) is that of registering authority. Under the 1965 Act there are very limited powers and scope of investigation for the FSA other than where an application is received from a prescribed number of members. Section 48 of the 1965 Act enables the FSA to require a society to provide documents and information but only where the FSA is considering cancelling a society's registration on particular grounds, such as a society not fulfilling the conditions of its original registration.

Crime: Domestic Violence

Question

Asked by Baroness Scotland of Asthal

The Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Neville-Jones): The information is not collected centrally.

Democratic Republic of Congo

Questions

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Lord Howell of Guildford): We are deeply concerned at the increasing intimidation and violence faced by human rights defenders, journalists, parliamentarians, and civil society in Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In addition to raising individual cases of concern we continue to press the Government of DRC bilaterally and with our EU partners to meet their responsibility for protecting human rights.

We have provided funding through the Africa Conflict Prevention Pool to the UN peacekeeping force in the Democratic Republic of Congo (MONUSCO) protection fund which supports human rights defenders.

Additionally we provide bilateral support to projects promoting human rights. We are currently in the process of assessing new proposals and will be allocating funding to successful projects in the coming weeks. In 2009-10 we contributed £14,048 to the UN peacekeeping force in the Democratic Republic of Congo (MONUC) protection unit which provides protection services to those in danger including relocation and advice on personal security.

We also funded a number of projects for the promotion of human rights including:



12 July 2010 : Column WA92

contributing £23,578 to REJEER, a children's rights non-governmental organisation (NGO), to fund a leaflet aimed at children to explain their rights under the 2009 Child Protection Law; and.spending £1,322 to arrange a screening of a film on sexual and gender-based violence to members of the DRC Parliament.

We are also contributing £11 million over five years to a media fund jointly administered with France and Sweden which supports local media organisations and NGOs including Journalists in Danger which campaigns for freedom of the press.

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

Lord Howell of Guildford: We are deeply concerned at the human rights situation in Democratic Republic of Congo. We have provided funding through the Africa Conflict Prevention Pool to the UN peacekeeping force in the Democratic Republic of Congo (MONUSCO) protection fund which supports human rights defenders.

Additionally we provide bilateral support to projects promoting human rights. We are currently in the process of assessing new proposals and will be allocating funding to successful projects in the coming weeks.

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

Lord Howell of Guildford: The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) celebrated 50 years of independence on 30 June. It is a relatively more secure country than it has been over the last decade. Despite ongoing localised violence, eight of the 11 provinces are generally stable. However there remain serious challenges, not least bringing peace and stability to the east of the country and holding elections in 2011.

The Independent Electoral Commission (CEI) in DRC announced on 14 April that general elections would take place according to the constitution by September 2011, and local elections after that in December 2012. We welcome the announcement of an electoral timetable; but we have expressed our disappointment at this further postponement of local elections.

The UK has promised over US$ 42 million and has already spent over US$ 14 million on voter registration for the DRC elections. We will continue to press the Government of DRC bilaterally and with our international community partners to make progress on preparations for the elections.

We also continue to urge the Government of the DRC to make clear what kind of support they expect from MONUC and the international community for the elections.



12 July 2010 : Column WA93

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

Lord Howell of Guildford: Human rights defenders, journalists, members of civil society, and parliamentarians continue to face harassment and violence. We receive reports of abuses against civil society and parliamentarians from a number of sources including our contact with local non-governmental organisations, Congolese MPs, the UN Human Rights Office, and the EU human rights group.

We will continue to follow up cases of concern and press-both bilaterally and with our EU partners-the Government of the Democratic Republic of Congo to take action.

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

Lord Howell of Guildford: We are deeply concerned by the increasing violence against human rights defenders, parliamentarians, journalists and members of civil society in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). We follow cases of concern very closely and will continue to press-bilaterally and with our EU partners-the Government of DRC to meet their responsibility for protecting human rights and freedom of expression.

We agreed with our EU partners a statement of concern at the death of the human rights defender Floribert Chebeya by the EU High Representative Baroness Ashton. We also provide £11 million to a media fund jointly administered with France and Sweden to support professionalisation, regulation, and the economic viability of the media in DRC. Funding goes to local media organisations and non-governmental organisations including Journalists in Danger which campaigns for freedom of the press.

We are committed to working with our international partners in DRC through the UN, and we are members of the International Contact Group on the Great Lakes Region in Africa whose members include Belgium, France, and the US.

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool



12 July 2010 : Column WA94

Lord Howell of Guildford: The overall situation in the Kivus in the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is significantly more stable than 18 months ago. The Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda (FDLR) have been weakened through Congolese military action and ongoing UN efforts to demobilise them. But they are not defeated and are still carrying out pillaging, killing and kidnapping. The Armed Forces of the DRC (FARDC) are also guilty of human rights abuses. However there is evidence to suggest that the FARDC carry out fewer abuses when they are working closely with the UN peacekeeping force to DRC (MONUSCO), and receiving regular pay and rations.

The political and military integration process for the ex-National Congress for the Defence of the People (CNDP) and former armed groups is fragile. Regular and accurate pay (appropriate to rank) is still a problem. We will continue to monitor the situation and encourage all parties to remain committed to the full implementation of the peace process.

In Orientale Province North Eastern DRC, the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) continues to carry out regular killings and abduction of civilians. UN Security Council Resolution 1925 provides MONUSCO with an increased focus on targeting the LRA, including the co-ordination of strategies with other UN missions and providing logistical support for military operations.

Education (School Premises) Regulations 1999

Question

Asked by Baroness Thornton

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Hill of Oareford): The department is reviewing its capital programme to ensure that when we build schools in future we do so in a more cost-effective and efficient fashion. As part of this we will take into account the work that was carried out before the election in reviewing the 1999 School Premises Regulations on toilet and drinking water provision in schools.

We will consult on any proposals and announce our plans in due course.

Embryology

Questions

Asked by Lord Walton of Detchant

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Baroness Wilcox): Government spend on stem cell research since 2004-05 has been as follows:



12 July 2010 : Column WA95



12 July 2010 : Column WA96

AdultEmbryonicAdult*/Embryonic**OtherTotal

2004-05

£10,609,978

£10,600,627

£176,000

£10,619,058

£32,005,663

2005-06

£11,953,661

£13,133,278

£550,000

£18,134,527

£43,771,466

2006-07

£17,569,647

£17,524,179

£855,000

£25,603,329

£61,5_52,155

2007-08

£24,890,344

£15,982,863

£1,162,000

£18,006,185

£60,041,392

2008-09

£29,228,480

£16,758,018

£1,157,000

£16,148,191

£63,291,689

*A number of research projects involve both adult and embryonic cell types

** Not all organisations have been able to provide a breakdown in the categories requested.

Asked by Lord Walton of Detchant

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): Though most focus is on regenerative medicine, stem cells have been used in tissue grafting and transplant medicine for many decades, including bone marrow and umbilical cord blood transplantation, corneal transplantation and skin grafting. In addition stem cells have also played a crucial role in tissue engineering, such as the successful windpipe transplant.

The Medical Research Council (MRC), one of the Government's main agencies for supporting biomedical and clinical research, has funded a number of early phase clinical trials in 2009, which aim to investigate stem cell technologies to develop treatments for eye disease, chronic myeloid leukaemia and Addison's disease. One further study aims to use stem cell technologies to treat bone fractures. The MRC and the Californian Institute of Regenerative Medicine also aim to bring stem cell treatments to the point of clinical trials within the next four years, for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration and acute myeloid leukaemia. Further information on these studies is available on the MRC's website at: www.mrc.ac.uk/Newspublications/News/MRC006229 and www.mrc.ac.uk/Newspublications/News/MRC006435

The Department of Health has asked the National Health Service Blood and Transplant Authority to lead on a strategic review of the use of stem cells from bone marrow and umbilical cord blood, which are mainly used in the treatment of life threatening blood disorders such as leukaemia and anaemia. It is due to report its findings this month.

EU: Food Labelling

Question

Asked by Lord Stoddart of Swindon

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): Current rules allow a number of foods, including eggs, to be sold by number. I am advised that it is not entirely clear in the Commission proposal for a food information regulation how the quantity of pre-packed food items is to be declared. The United Kingdom will continue to seek amendments to the text which will allow selling by number to continue.

European Commission: Media

Question

Asked by Lord Stoddart of Swindon

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Lord Howell of Guildford): This is a matter for the Commission. However, the UK believes that the EU should deliver more for less. We will oppose all wasteful EU spending.

European Commission: Staff

Question

Asked by Lord Marlesford

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Lord Howell of Guildford): The Commission's draft budget for 2011 indicates that remuneration and normal entitlements of staff will increase by 5 per cent to 2.26 billion euros in 2011. This reflects the funds for increased staff costs due to staff upgradings, and in-year and expected future salary adjustments.

The draft budget is a Commission proposal only at this stage. The Council and European Parliament will spend the next five months negotiating it in detail, and we will not therefore know the final level of the EU's budget until the end of this year.

The Government believe that the 2011 estimates for the administration heading proposed by the Commission must be reduced, and closely scrutinise all bids for higher administration costs. The Government are arguing that payments in the 2011 EU Budget should remain at cash levels equivalent to the 2010 budget.



12 July 2010 : Column WA97

Fishing: Common Fisheries Policy

Question

Asked by Lord Pearson of Rannoch

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord Henley): There is broad agreement across the EU about the case for reform, including the need to decentralise and simplify the current complex regulations. Few, if any, member states support the status quo, though views vary as to the changes needed.

Ordinary legislative procedure would apply to a legislative decision on reform, meaning that both the Council of the European Union, and the European Parliament, would need to approve reform proposals, according to the voting rules and procedures in the relevant treaty provisions; most particularly Articles 231, 238, 289 and 294 of the Treaty on the Functioning

12 July 2010 : Column WA98

of the European Union, and Article 16 (and the attached protocol on transitional provisions) of the Treaty on the European Union.

Food: Chicken

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord Henley): The table below shows the amount of chicken meat imported into the UK from EU and non-EU countries as recorded in the Official Overseas Trade Statistics for the period 2007-09.

UK imports of chicken meat, 2007-09
Thousand Tonnes
EU/Non EUType2007200820091

EU

Chicken meat (inc offal)2

317

274

270

Chicken meat products and reparations3

67

69

62

EU Total

384

343

332

Non EU

Chicken meat (inc offal)

23

22

24

Chicken meat products and preparations

109

135

139

Non EU Total

132

157

163

Grand Total

516

500

495

(c) Crown Copyright

Source: HM Revenue and Customs

Data prepared by Trade Statistics, Economics and Statistics Programme, Defra

1 2009 data are subject to amendments.

2 Chicken meat (inc. offal) includes fresh, chilled or frozen carcase meat (whole birds), cuts and offal (inc. liver).

3 Chicken meat products and preparations includes prepared, preserved, salted or cooked chicken meat and offal (inc. liver).

The table below shows the top five countries from which the UK imported the largest amounts in the past year.

Top five countries from which the UK imported chicken meat in 2009
Thousand Tonnes
TypeCountry of dispatch20094

Chicken meat(inc offal)5

Netherlands

147

Irish Republic

24

Poland

21

Belgium

21

France

18

Chicken meat products and preparations6

Thailand

119

Netherlands

22

Brazil

15

Irish Republic

13

Germany

6

(c) Crown Copyright

Source: H M Revenue and Customs

Data prepared by Trade Statistics, Economics and Statistics Programme, Defra

4 2009 data are subject to amendments.

5 Chicken meat (inc. offal) includes fresh, chilled or frozen carcase meat (whole birds), cuts and offal (inc. liver).

6 Chicken meat products and preparations includes prepared, preserved, salted or cooked chicken meat and offal (inc. liver).



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World Trade Organisation (WTO) rules do not allow members to ban imports on the grounds of the welfare standards applied in third countries. The UK continues to work with the European Union and the WTO membership to advocate high animal welfare standards and is working to include a provision for animal welfare in the WTO Sanitary and Phytosanitary agreement.

Health: Costs

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The total published European Economic Area (EEA) medical costs for

12 July 2010 : Column WA100

2004-05 to 2008-09 are set out in table 1, broken down from 2005-06 by country in table 2. A breakdown by country is not available for years prior to 2005-06.

The latest published average costs for each EEA member state is set out in table 3.

Table 1
EEA Medical Costs: Resource Outturn Totals 2004-05 to 2008-09
Member State Claims Against United Kingdom
UK Claims Against Member States
Financial YearMember State ClaimsUK Claims

2004-05

£381,500,000

£31,200,000

2005-06

£465,400,000

£35,100,000

2006-07

£527,900,000

£38,100,000

2007-08

£630,400,000

£45,900,000

2008-09

£709,500,000

£47,300,000

Notes:

1. Totals are based on estimates of the costs of European Economic Area (EEA) healthcare claims made annually for the purposes of provisions made in the Department of Health accounts in accordance with Treasury resource accounting rules.

2. Totals are rounded to nearest £100,000.

Source: Resource Accounting and Budgeting (RAB) exercise.



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Table 2
EEA Medical Costs: Resource Outturn Totals 2005-06 to 2008-09 (by Country)
Member State Claims Against UK
UK Claims Against Member States
2005-06 Member State Claims2005-06 UK Claims2006-07 Member State Claims2006-07 UK Claims

Austria

£2,726,000

£474,000

£2,956,000

£539,000

Belgium

£2,943,000

£2,182,000

£3,768,000

£2,902,000

Bulgaria

£0

£0

£0

£0

Cyprus

£4,204,000

£0

£11,366,000

£0

Czech Republic

£0

£0

£0

£0

Denmark (Waiver)

£0

£0

£0

£0

Estonia (Waiver) (2)

£0

£0

£0

£0

Finland (Waiver) (3)

£0

£0

£0

£0

France

£67,977,000

£3,312,000

£83,003,000

£3,798,000

Germany

£5,204,000

£16,000

£5,630,000

£925,000

Greece

£616,000

£807,000

£857,000

£401,000

Hungary (Waiver) (3)

£0

£0

£0

£0

Iceland

£30,000

£9,000

£33,000

£9,000

Ireland

£296,812,000

£20,742,000

£289,194,000

£21,145,000

Italy

£5,406,000

£4,034,000

£5,480,000

£3,848,000

Latvia

£0

£0

£0

£0

Liechtenstein

£0

£0

£0

£0

Lithuania

£0

£0

£0

£0

Luxembourg (4)

£0

£0

£0

£0

Malta (Waiver) (3)

£0

£0

£0

£0

Netherlands

£4,763,000

£1,699,000

£4,913,000

£1,953,000

Norway (Waiver) (3)

£0

£0

£0

£0

Poland

£0

£0

£0

£0

Portugal

£1,137,000

£3,000

£1,375,000

£0

Romania

£0

£0

£0

£0

Slovakia

£0

£0

£0

£0

Slovenia

£0

£0

£0

£0

Spain

£70,624,000

£1,081,000

£117,452,000

£1,805,000

Sweden

£687,000

£773,000

£684,000

£754,000

Switzerland

£2,284,000

£0

£1,223,000

£0

Total

£465,400,000

£35,100,000

£527,900,000

£38,100,000

Notes:

1. Totals are based on estimates of the costs of European Economic Area (EEA) healthcare claims made annually for the purposes of provisions made in the Department of Health accounts in accordance with Treasury resource accounting rules.

2. Excepting Article 22.1c (patient referral) and Article 55.1c (industrial injury) claims.

3. Excepting Article 22.1c (patient referral) claims.

4. Previously waiver, regulations apply from 30 June 2008.

5. Country totals are rounded to nearest £1,000, overall totals to nearest £100,000.

6. Sub-totals may not add up to totals due to rounding.

7. Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia joined the EU on 1 May 2004.

8. Bulgaria and Romania joined the EU on 1 January 2007.

Source: Resource Accounting and Budgeting (RAB) exercise.

Table 2 (Continued)
EEA Medical Costs: Resource Outturn Totals 2005-06 to 2008-09 (by Country)
Member State Claims Against UK
UK Claims Against Member States
2007-08 Member State Claims2007-08 UK Claims2008-09 Member State Claims2008-09 UK Claims

Austria

£2,615,000

£710,000

£3,167,000

£604,000

Belgium

£4,186,000

£2,920,000

£5,646,000

£2,122,000

Bulgaria

£71,000

£0

£111,000

£0

Cyprus

£4,751,000

£0

£5,916,000

£5,000

Czech Republic

£233,000

£0

£329,000

£11,000

Denmark (Waiver)

£0

£0

£0

£0

Estonia (Waiver) (2)

£0

£0

£0

£0

Finland (Waiver) (3)

£17,000

£0

£4,000

£0

France

£136,112,000

£5,586,000

£154,540,000

£5,047,000

Germany

£12,795,000

£1,277,000

£15,198,000

£1,226,000

Greece

£3,567,000

£90,000

£5,072,000

£616,000

Hungary (Waiver) (3)

£0

£11,000

£0

£8,000

Iceland

£153,000

£0

£124,000

£25,000

Ireland

£303,221,000

£21,624,000

£331,162,000

£24,488,000

Italy

£9,932,000

£5,294,000

£8,649,000

£6,280,000

Latvia

£27,000

£0

£20,000

£0

Liechtenstein

£3,000

£0

£4,000

£0

Lithuania

£15,000

£0

£19,000

£0

Luxembourg (4)

£0

£0

£242,000

£0

Malta (Waiver) (3)

£0

£0

£0

£0

Netherlands

£6,678,000

£2,805,000

£7,952,000

£2,610,000

Norway (Waiver) (3)

£0

£0

£0

£0

Poland

£754,000

£0

£1,045,000

£17,000

Portugal

£2,795,000

£54,000

£2,171,000

£183,000

Romania

£16,000

£0

£10,000

£0

Slovakia

£59,000

£0

£415,000

£0

Slovenia

£218,000

£236,000

£152,000

£64,000

Spain

£136,931,000

£4,116,000

£162,014,000

£2,830,000

Sweden

£1,361,000

£1,159,000

£1,359,000

£1,071,000

Switzerland

£3,920,000

£67,000

£4,138,000

£62,000

Total

£630,400,000

£45,900,000

£709,500,000

£47,300,000

Notes:

1. Totals are based on estimates of the costs of European Economic Area (EEA) healthcare claims made annually for the purposes of provisions made in the Department of Health accounts in accordance with Treasury resource accounting rules.

2. Excepting Article 22.1c (patient referral) and Article 55.1c (industrial injury) claims.

3. Excepting Article 22.1c (patient referral) claims.



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4. Previously waiver, regulations apply from 30 June 2008.

5. Country totals are rounded to nearest £1,000, overall totals to nearest £100,000.

6. Sub-totals may not add up to totals due to rounding.

7. Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia joined the EU on 1 May 2004.

8. Bulgaria and Romania joined the EU on 1 January 2007.

Source: Resource Accounting and Budgeting (RAB) exercise.

Table 3
EEA Medical Costs
Member State Average Cost (Latest Published) (1)
YearCurrencyArticle 94 (2)Article 95 (3)

Austria

2008

EURO

1,855.72

4,681.70

Belgium

2007

EURO

1,448.77

4,775.84

Bulgaria

BGN

N/A

N/A

Cyprus

2005

EURO

602.05

816.63

Czech Republic

2008

CZK

14,035.48

42,632.29

Denmark

DKK

N/A

N/A

Estonia

2008

EEK

6,200.71

14,970.08

Finland

2005

EURO

1,140.04

3,799.91

France

2007

EURO

2,216.92

5,202.72

Germany

2007

EURO

1,153.25

4,558.33

Greece

2006

EURO

1,086.47

2,169.08

Hungary

2008

HUF

83,528.00

260,448.00

Iceland

ISK

N/A

N/A

Ireland

2004

EURO

3,527.51

6,789.44

Italy

2007

EURO

2,351.73

2,773.24

Latvia

2007

LVL

255.01

320.07

Liechtenstein

2008

CHF

4,300.95

9,197.40

Lithuania

2008

LTL

1,007.87

2,726.71

Luxembourg

2007

EURO

2,594.83

8,432.37

Malta

2006

EURO

543.98

1,479.27

Netherlands

2007

EURO

1,804.86

9,212.14

Norway

2008

NOK

40,650.00

73,392.00

Poland

2005

PLN

709.36

2,203.05

Portugal

2007

EURO

999.79

1,845.42

Romania

RON

N/A

N/A

Slovakia

2005

EURO

317.25

977.77

Slovenia

2008

EURO

663.97

1,835.16

Spain

2008

EURO

1,283.27

3,491.45

Sweden

2007

SEK

15,353.20

43,515.81

Switzerland

2008

CHF

2,680.15

7,088.55

UK

2007

GBP

£1,820.42

£3,368.98

Notes:

1. There are no published average costs for Bulgaria, Denmark, Iceland and Romania.

2. Dependants in home state.

3. Pensioners and dependants.

Health: Stoma Care

Question

Asked by Lord Marlesford

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): It is for National Health Service organisations to commission and deploy stoma care services in accordance with their local needs.

Human Rights

Question

Asked by Lord Lester of Herne Hill



12 July 2010 : Column WA105

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord McNally): As I indicated in my Written Answer of 10 June (Official Report, col. WA 57), the Government are currently considering this issue and will take a decision in due course.

Independent Networks Co-operative Association Ltd

Questions

Asked by Lord Laird

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Baroness Wilcox): Officials from the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills have not requested companies to sponsor the Independent Networks Co-operative Association Ltd.

Asked by Lord Laird

Baroness Wilcox: I have nothing further to add to previous Answers on this subject, provided at Hansard 9 June (col. WA 46-47), 10 June (col. WA 55), 15 June (col. WA 104), 15 June (col. WA 104), 15 June (col. WA 103-04), 15 June (col. WA 105), 15 June (col. WA 105), 15 June (col. WA 104), 15 June (col. WA 103), 15 June (col. WA 103) and 16 June (col. WA 119).



12 July 2010 : Column WA106

Legislation

Question

Asked by Baroness Goudie

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord McNally): Decisions to commence legislation are made by the relevant Secretary of State on a case-by-case basis. When considering the appropriate date for commencement, the Secretary of State will take into account all relevant factors, including for example the impact of the timing of commencement on the general public, legal practitioners or court proceedings.

Wherever possible, legislation which impacts on business, for example health and safety, work and pensions, or company and consumer legislation, will be commenced on "common commencement dates"-at the start of the financial year, 6 April, or on 1 October.

Where commencement of provisions is the responsibility of the devolved authorities, it will be for those bodies to decide on the timing of commencement.

All commencement orders are approved and signed by or on behalf of the relevant Secretary of State. They are then registered by the Office of Public Sector Information and published by the Stationery Office. Commencement orders are made available to Members of the Houses of Commons and Lords in the Vote and Printed Paper Offices and to the public via the OPSI website, generally within three days.

Ministry of Defence: Headquarters

Question

Asked by Lord Morris of Manchester

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence (Lord Astor of Hever): The physical redevelopment of the Ministry of Defence (MoD) main building was completed under a private finance initiative project in July 2004 at a cost of £323 million (VAT exclusive). The project as a whole included the provision and operation of decant accommodation for the duration of the main building works and for the ongoing provision of serviced office accommodation in both the main building and Old War Office building until 2030. The original forecast outturn cost of the entire project was £2.25 billion; the current estimate is £2.46 billion and as at June 2010, £576 million has been spent on the project. The MoD now plans to dispose of the Old War Office building after it becomes fully surplus to requirements in 2013, which should reduce the final outturn.



12 July 2010 : Column WA107

National Insurance

Question

Asked by Baroness Hollis of Heigham

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Sassoon): There is no upper earnings limit on national insurance contributions for employers.

The additional amount of revenue that would be raised from the removal of the upper earnings limit for employees paying class 1 national insurance contributions and the upper profits limit for self-employed individuals paying class 4 contributions is estimated to be around £11 billion in 2010-11.

This figure would be reduced to around £6 billion once behavioural effects of taxpayers are taken into account. This estimate is consistent with the Office for Budget Responsibility's Budget 2010 assumptions set out in Annexe C of the Budget document: http://www.hm-treasury.gov.uk/d/junebudget_annexc.pdf. However, given the scale of the change, the behavioural impact is subject to some uncertainty.

Natural England

Question

Asked by Baroness Byford

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord Henley): Natural England does not employ the services of any lobbying companies or advisers.

Parkland: Soil Contamination

Question

Asked by Lord Lester of Herne Hill

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord Henley): Responsibility for identifying contaminated land and, where necessary, ensuring that such land is remediated falls to local authorities under Part 2A of the Environmental Protection Act 1990.



12 July 2010 : Column WA108

In 2006, Defra gave a capital grant of £70,940 to the London Borough of Tower Hamlets to investigate potential land contamination at Mudchute Park Farm to establish whether or not the land posed sufficient risk to qualify as contaminated land under the 1990 Act. The department is not aware of the outcome of this investigation, including whether or not any relevant epidemiological evidence exists. However, Defra would not normally hold such detailed information relating to specific sites, and you may wish to redirect your question to the London Borough of Tower Hamlets.

The department is not aware of any relevant epidemiological evidence relating to parks more generally. It is possible that land contamination at individual parks could pose sufficient risk to justify actions that might affect public access to and enjoyment of such parks. However, as with any land potentially affected by contamination, each site would need to be investigated separately to establish whether contamination is present and what the risks are. This is a matter for local authorities under the 1990 Act.

Parliament Square

Question

Asked by Lord Eden of Winton

The Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Neville-Jones): The care and management of Parliament Square Garden is the responsibility of the Greater London Authority under the GLA Act 1999.

The Home Office is discussing with the GLA its plans to restore public access to Parliament Square Garden in the light of the recent judgment at the High Court.

People Trafficking

Question

Asked by Lord Hylton

The Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Neville-Jones): The UK signed the Council of Europe Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings in March 2007, ratified it in December 2008, and implemented it from 1 April 2009. At the centre of the convention is a duty to meet minimum standards concerning the identification and protection of victims of trafficking called the national referral mechanism (NRM). To meet this obligation a government-led, multi-agency framework was created to help identify and support victims.

The coalition Government are currently reviewing monitoring arrangements. The responsible Minister of State in the Home Office has offered to write to the noble Lord when the review is complete.



12 July 2010 : Column WA109

Police: Stop and Search

Questions

Asked by Lord Ouseley

The Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Neville-Jones): The Government share the concerns about disproportionality in the use of stop-and-search powers. We are working with the police service to help ensure that stop-and-search powers are used appropriately. There is, however, no single cause of disproportionality. It is important, therefore, to look at levels of disproportionality, and any specific demographic or other factors, in individual forces.

The National Policing Improvement Agency (NPIA) has developed Next Steps, a diagnostic tool to ensure that a force's use of stop and search is not driven by other unjustified factors such as discrimination or stereotyping. NPIA will support forces to implement Next Steps and will target forces with high levels of disproportionality. We are about to start the roll out of Next Steps in Dorset, Merseyside and one borough of the Metropolitan Police.

Detailed guidance on the appropriate use of stop-and-search powers are contained in the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 Code of Practice A. This includes the fundamental principles governing stop and search, which are that the powers must be used fairly, responsibly, with respect for people being searched and without unlawful discrimination. In 2005 the national Stop and Search Manual was published jointly by the Home Office, the Association of Chief Police Officers and the Association of Police Authorities. The manual gives further detailed good practice, training packages and supervision techniques and looks at what should be done to address issues around the disproportionate use of stop-and-search powers.

In addition to this, police forces have their own operational advice and guidance which will address local stop-and-search and community issues.



12 July 2010 : Column WA110

Quangos

Question

Asked by Lord Greaves

Lord Taylor of Holbeach: The Government have already announced plans to abolish the British Educational Communications and Technology Agency, the Qualifications and Curriculum Development Agency and the General Teaching Council for England. The coalition agreement also announced plans to abolish the Government Office for London, the Standards Board and the Infrastructure Planning Commission. It announced that regional development agencies would be replaced with local enterprise partnerships. The list of remaining quangos to be abolished is not yet finalised.

On 24 May the Chancellor and Chief Secretary to the Treasury announced that savings from these reforms, plus additional savings from departments, will total around £600 million in 2010-11.

A primary aim of the planned public bodies Bill is to increase the accountability of public bodies, but we also expect that abolitions and mergers arising from the Bill will create savings in future years and departments will be incorporating initial savings into their spending review plans.

Saudi Arabia

Question

Asked by Lord Ahmed

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Lord Howell of Guildford): We remain deeply concerned about the human rights situation in Saudi Arabia. We will continue to make it clear to the authorities our concerns at ministerial, ambassadorial and working level. In particular, we have concerns over the use of the death penalty, women's rights, the quality of judicial procedure, the rights of foreign workers and discrimination against ethnic and religious minorities, such as the Shia in the Eastern Province, Ismailis in Najran and Suffis in Mecca. While we welcome limited progress in some of these areas, we will continue to use bilateral opportunities to raise our concerns to the Saudi Government, and will continue to work with partners to make sure the EU does the same.



12 July 2010 : Column WA111

Schools: Academies

Question

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Hill of Oareford): The Secretary of State will consider each free school proposal on its merits, and take into account all matters relevant to that proposal. This will include proposals from boards of education of the Church of England, Roman Catholic and other faith-based organisations. All free schools will be required to comply with the school admissions code and have inclusive admission arrangements.

Because of this we wish to ensure that free schools are open to the broadest possible range of local children. New faith academies have previously been set up on the presumption that they will admit 50 per cent of their intake without reference to faith and we will continue to require this for all new faith academies and free schools. This will also apply to independent schools converting to academy status.

Faith groups will continue to be able to propose to establish a new voluntary-aided faith school using the established statutory process for maintained schools. Similarly, an independent faith school will continue to be able to use the established statutory process to propose joining the maintained sector as a voluntary-aided school.

The Equality Act 2006 and the Employment Equality (Religion or Belief) Regulations 2003 sets out that voluntary-aided schools are permitted to take faith into account when appointing teachers. They may only take faith into account in appointing non-teaching staff if they are able to demonstrate that there is a genuine occupational requirement for the member of staff to be of the faith. Free schools, like academies, will also be permitted to take faith into account when appointing teachers. They may also take faith into account in appointing non-teaching staff if they are able to demonstrate that there is a genuine occupational requirement for the member of staff to be of the faith.

Smoking

Question

Asked by Lord Stoddart of Swindon



12 July 2010 : Column WA112

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The department has not compiled further evidence to support the figure of 10,700 deaths annually caused by passive smoking. This figure, which was included by the Royal College of Physicians in March 2010 in its report Passive Smoking and Children, is entirely in line with the clearly established evidence from across the world about the harm to health from second-hand smoke.

Superannuation Act 1972

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

Lord Taylor of Holbeach: The Government will make it clear that the 1972 Superannuation Act protects accrued rights to pensions.

Timber

Question

Asked by Lord Hylton

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord Henley): From 1 April 2009 all timber and timber-derived products purchased by UK Government departments, agencies and non-departmental public bodies must comply with the UK Government's timber procurement policy. Only legal and sustainable or FLEGT licensed timber and wood products should be purchased.

The UK Government are committed to reporting better on their timber purchases and in July 2009 Defra published a study looking at this aspect. The report is available on the Central Point of Expertise on Timber (CPET) website with the recommendations. www.proforest.net/cpet/files/CPET%20Reporting% 20pilot%20study%20July%2009.pdf/view.

The report showed that implementation of reporting requirements across mandated bodies is not currently possible, as data are not held centrally. Assurance of implementation and compliance with the policy should, however, be a first step towards achieving meaningful data.

Vehicles: Automatic Plate Recognition

Question

Asked by Lord Corbett of Castle Vale

The Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Neville-Jones): The Government will never compromise the safety and security of the British public but neither will we sacrifice their civil liberties for their security.

The Government see a need to re-examine the balance between liberty and security and, as part of this broader agenda, are looking closely at the regulatory framework for both CCTV and automatic number plate recognition (ANPR) systems. Work is currently under way with a view to bringing forward proposals as soon as possible.

Voluntary Sector

Question

Asked by Lord Ouseley

Lord Taylor of Holbeach: The big society vision is that more power and opportunity are shifted to individuals and communities. The voluntary and community sector will have a fundamental part in making this a reality.

The Government recognise that there will be difficulties in the current economic climate but aim to promote and support the role of the sector in providing services. For example, we will create an independent big society bank to unlock hundreds of millions of pounds of new finance for social enterprises, charities and voluntary organisations. We will also set up the community organisers' programme which will identify, train and support 5,000 people who want to make a difference to their community over the lifetime of this Parliament. Complementing this, the community first programme is a new fund that will encourage more social action by new and existing neighbourhood groups.


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