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6 Oct 2010 : Column WA7



6 Oct 2010 : Column WA7

Written Answers

Wednesday 6 October 2010

Alcohol

Questions

Asked by Baroness Coussins



6 Oct 2010 : Column WA8

The Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Neville-Jones): Data showing the number of cautions, prosecutions and convictions for various alcohol offences from 2005-08 are provided in the attached table. Data for persistent sales of alcohol to children are shown under offence code 14398, for purchasing alcohol underage under offence codes 14382 and 14316, for alcohol sales to a drunk under offence codes 14374 and 14375 and for making/attempting to purchase alcohol on behalf of a child under offence codes 14383 and 14317. The data for the persistent sales offence came into effect in 2008. Court proceedings data for 2009 are planned for publication in October 2010.

The court proceedings database holds information on defendants proceeded against, found guilty and sentenced for criminal offences, the statutes under which proceedings are brought or the circumstances of each case. It is not possible to identify from this centrally available information whether the offence proceeded against involving selling alcohol was on-trade or off-trade.

Additionally, penalty notices for disorder (PNDs) are also available for these offences and the information is provided in the attached table 2.1.

Copies of these tables will be placed in the Libraries of the House.



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6 Oct 2010 : Column WA11



6 Oct 2010 : Column WA12

The number of offenders cautioned and defendants proceeded against at magistrates' courts and found guilty at all courts for selected offences, England and Wales,2005 to 2008(1)(2)(3)(4)(5)
CautionedProceeded againstFound guilty
Offence code / description200520062007200820052006200720082005200620072008

Underage Sales

14384 Individual aged under 18 knowingly consuming alcohol

-

2

1

1

-

1

3

-

-

1

1

-

14379 Sale of alcohol to person under 18

1

36

33

28

29

440

620

401

21

317

479

320

14398 Persistently selling alcohol to children

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

-

-

7

14203 Selling etc intoxicating liquor to person under 18 for consumption on the premises.

97

22

7

1

1,044

741

63

31

742

526

40

23

14380 Allowing sale of alcohol to person under 18.

-

-

2

1

-

17

10

19

-

11

6

16

14352 Wholesaler selling intoxicating liquor to a person under 18.

4

3

-

-

11

1

-

-

9

-

-

-

Other Underage Offences

14382 Purchase of alcohol by an individual under 18

3

9

23

15

-

3

6

6

-

3

5

4

14383 Buying or attempting to buy alcohol on behalf of an individual under 18

2

13

14

19

-

18

16

42

-

14

14

28

14317 Buying, attempting to buy, intoxicating liquor for consumption by person under 18

12

11

3

5

29

14

5

1

24

12

4

-

14385 Knowingly allowing consumption of alcohol by individual aged under 18

-

2

1

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

-

14316 Person under 18 buying or attempting to buy or consuming intoxicating liquor in licensed premises.

21

3

8

7

21

12

4

3

15

10

2

1

Sales to a drunken person

14374 Sale of alcohol to a person who is drunk

1

-

5

-

-

2

7

17

-

1

1

7

14375 Obtaining alcohol for a person who is drunk

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

Drunk and Disorderly

14001 Being found drunk in a highway or other public place, whether a building or not, or a licensed premises

591

495

402

515

1,392

1,170

1,126

1,076

1,261

1,056

1,026

984

14101 Being guilty while drunk of disorderly behaviour

7,672

4,982

5,306

6,904

16,342

16,143

17,911

19,447

14,138

13,939

15,741

17,245

Habitual Drunk Offences

14306 Purchasing or obtaining intoxicating liquor at licensed premises or registered club within three years after conviction for habitual drunkenness

-

-

-

-

1

1

1

-

1

1

-

-

14202 Licence holder selling or supplying intoxicating liquor to a habitual drunkard within three years after conviction for habitual drunkenness

-

-

-

-

1

-

2

-

1

-

1

-

14318 Officer of a registered club selling or supplying liquor to a habitual drunkard within three years after conviction for habitual drunkenness

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

-

-

Public Place/other

19508 Failure to stop a vehicle when required to do so by a constable in the exercise of his powers under this section of the Act [Criminal Justice & Public Order Act 1994, S.60]

1

2

-

-

8

3

3

4

4

3

-

3

14011 Alcohol consumption in designated public places

12

13

15

18

101

101

113

153

76

73

98

123

19615 Contravention of a direction given by a constable under Section 30(4) [dispersal of groups and removal of persons under 16 to their place of residence]

280

137

209

108

620

538

522

433

406

303

329

299

14102 Being drunk while in charge on any highway or other public place of any carriage, horse, cattle, steam engine or pedal cycle

12

12

30

28

65

67

40

64

60

51

31

51

14376 Failure to leave licensed premises etc.

-

6

5

1

1

11

20

9

1

6

13

7

10433 Resisting or obstructing a constable in execution of duty

1,228

1,674

1,984

2,011

7,689

7,358

7,982

7,258

5,712

5,541

6,243

5,749

Licensable activity

14371 Carrying on or attempting to carry on or knowingly allowing a licensable activity on or from any premises otherwise than under and in accordance with an authorisation

1

33

12

17

-

159

300

346

-

87

229

257

14291 Allowing disorderly conduct on licensed premises

2

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

-

-

-

1

14391 Knowingly keeping premises open in contravention of closure order (identified relevant premises - 24 hrs max)

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

-

-

Total

9,928

7,444

8,057

9,675

27,325

26,790

28,753

29,321

22,447

21,945

24,262

25,125

Key totals

Sales to underage

102

61

42

30

1,084

1,199

693

459

772

854

525

366

Sales to a drunken person

1

0

5

0

0

2

7

18

0

1

1

7

Purchase by underage

24

12

31

22

21

15

10

9

15

13

7

5

Drunk and Disorderly

8,263

5,477

5,708

7,419

17,734

17,313

19,037

20,523

15,399

14,995

16,767

18,229



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6 Oct 2010 : Column WA15



6 Oct 2010 : Column WA16

Table 2.1-Number of Penalty Notices for Disorder issued to offenders aged 16 and above by offence, 2004-08
England and Wales
All AgesAged 16-17Aged 18+
Offence200420052006200720082004200520062007200820042005200620072008

Wasting police time

1,171

2,525

3,933

3,966

3,443

69

215

353

327

254

1,102

2,310

3,580

3,639

3,189

Misuse of public telecommunications system

117

405

909

1,193

888

6

24

79

106

88

111

381

830

1,087

800

Giving false alarm to fire and rescue authority

44

92

106

96

77

8

6

15

15

7

36

86

91

81

70

Causing Harassment, alarm or distress

28,790

64,007

82,235

77,827

57,773

1,968

5,846

8,122

7,068

4,673

26,822

58,161

74,113

70,759

53,100

Throwing fireworks(1)

177

642

682

649

531

20

90

101

102

82

157

552

581

547

449

Drunk and disorderly(2)

26,609

37,038

43,556

46,996

44,411

1,328

2,354

3,009

2,941

2,538

25,281

34,684

40,547

44,055

41,873

Criminal Damage (under £500)(3)

1,190

12,168

20,620

19,946

13,427

103

1,408

2,866

2,796

1,815

1,087

10,760

17,754

17,150

11,612

Theft (retail under £200)(3)

2,072

21,997

38,772

45,146

45,616

167

1,806

3,861

4,474

4,040

1,905

20,191

34,911

40,672

41,576

Breach of fireworks curfew(4)

12

33

53

39

23

-

4

7

3

3

12

29

46

36

20

Possession of category 4 firework(4)

12

13

28

22

23

3

2

6

5

6

9

11

22

17

17

Possession by a person under 18 of adult firework(4)

20

47

76

106

67

18

42

69

106

57

2

5

7

-

10

Sale of alcohol to drunken person(5)

*

32

47

81

66

-

2

1

1

2

-

30

46

80

64

Supply of alcohol to a person under 18

-

3

60

54

83

-

-

5

1

2

-

3

55

53

81

Sale of alcohol to a person under 18(3)

113

2,058

3,195

3,583

2,824

6

79

91

77

42

107

1,979

3,104

3,506

2,782

Purchasing alcohol for a person under 18(3)

84

170

407

555

524

7

20

45

51

33

77

150

362

504

491

Purchasing alcohol for a person under 18 for consumption on the premises

-

83

60

64

50

-

21

17

13

10

-

62

43

51

40

Delivery of alcohol to a person under 18 or allowing such delivery(3)

20

209

297

431

286

1

20

24

36

23

19

189

273

395

263

Lower Tier Offences (£50)

Trespassing on a railway

96

220

1,042

1,527

1,468

17

73

256

291

257

79

147

786

1,236

1,211

Throwing stones at a train / railway

66

20

15

25

27

2

5

4

10

8

64

15

11

15

19

Drunk in a highway

2,497

3,138

2,712

2,066

1,438

31

103

149

106

57

2,466

3,035

2,563

1,960

1,381

Consumption of alcohol in a designated public place

485

712

1,061

1,544

1,761

20

56

136

172

126

465

656

925

1,372

1,635

Depositing and leaving litter(3)

51

737

1,169

1,374

1,202

11

185

253

301

241

40

552

916

1,073

961

Consumption of alcohol by a person under 18 on relevant premises(3)

7

84

75

85

36

7

74

67

85

31

-

10

8

-

5

Allowing consumption of alcohol by a person under 18 on relevant premises(3)

6

27

14

11

6

1

2

-

1

2

5

25

14

10

4

Buying or Attempting to buy alcohol by a person under 18(5)

*

21

73

158

114

-

17

62

158

100

4

11

-

14

Totals

Total Higher Tier Offences

60,431

141,522

195,036

200,754

170,112

3,704

11,939

18,671

18,122

13,675

56,727

129,583

176,365

182,632

156,437

Total Lower Tier Offences

3,208

4,959

6,161

6,790

6,052

89

515

927

1,124

822

3,119

4,444

5,234

5,666

5,230

Total all offences

63,639

146,481

201,197

207,544

176,164

3,793

12,454

19,598

19,246

14,497

59,846

134,027

181,599

188,298

161,667

Anti-Semitism

Question

Asked by Lord Patten

The Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Neville-Jones): The Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) National Community Tension Team (NCTT) monitors anti-Semitic incidents and provides information to local police forces if there is anything that they need to be aware of. In addition, the Community Security Trust (CST) runs its own reporting centre for victims of anti-Semitism who are not comfortable with reporting to the police. The CST has a good relationship with the NCTT and other police forces.

The combined work of the NCTT and the CST provides a comprehensive breakdown of the anti-Semitic incidents that have taken place across the country.

Bovine Tuberculosis

Questions

Asked by Lord Krebs

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord Henley): Professor Watson, Defra's Chief Scientific Adviser, and officials from his office have regular meetings with officials from Defra's bovine TB programme and have provided input on the scientific advice including at meetings with the Secretary of State and the Minister of State during the development of proposals and the consultation. Professor Watson discussed the evidence and requested views from Defra's TB Science Advisory Body on a scientific paper by Jenkins et al. (2010), which presents results of the monitoring activity that has continued in proactively culled and survey-only areas since the end of the Randomised Badger Control Trial (RBCT). Professor Watson's suggestions and comments were included in developing the consultation and associated documents. Professor Watson continues to be involved in consideration of the proposal outlined in the consultation and has also asked a joint group of representatives from the TB Science Advisory Body and Defra's Science Advisory Council to provide advice on the proposal in the consultation.

Sir John Beddington, the government Chief Scientific Adviser, and his officials discussed the evidence around bovine TB and badgers with Professor Watson and Defra officials when the proposals were in development. Sir John's advice was discussed with Ministers in preparing the consultation and associated documents. Defra officials continue to be in regular contact with colleagues from Sir John's office.



6 Oct 2010 : Column WA17

Coastal Access

Questions

Asked by Lord Hunt of Kings Heath

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord Henley): We are aiming to open the first stretch of new coastal access at Weymouth, where the Olympic sailing events are being staged, in time for the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2012. Natural England has been asked to identify five additional lead areas where the coastal path can be rolled out, taking into account the views of local people and the tourism and economic benefits that improvements to access to the coast are expected to bring. Rollout in those areas will begin in 2011 following initial discussions that Natural England will need to have with the relevant local authorities in the areas.

The availability of future funding for a wider rollout of coastal access, in addition to Weymouth and the five lead areas, is being considered as part of the comprehensive spending review.

Council for the Registration of Forensic Practitioners

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

The Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Neville-Jones): The original ministerial announcement of funding to the Council for the Regulation of Forensic Practitioners (CRFP) in 1999 was expressly subject to the CRFP's performance, particularly the condition that it became self-financing through registrants' fees and there should not be a long-term reliance on grant.

By the time the CRFP closed, this goal of a self-funding independent accreditation body had not been achieved and the company was facing a long-term shortfall of funding, because the registration income did not match the expenditure and would not have matched it, irrespective of whether the government grant had been continued or not. This was likely to become considerably worse because of the withdrawal of support for the registration process by police forces and the long planned ending of grant in aid in 2010.

The grant was latterly provided by the National Policing Improvement Agency (NPIA), which in 2008 jointly commissioned with the CRFP an independent analysis of the CRFP's finances. Following this, the CRFP's financial situation, as detailed above, was

6 Oct 2010 : Column WA18

clear and further commitment of public money to the CRFP would have amounted to a long-term commitment to funding the company without full public control, which would not have been a justifiable or sustainable approach. The NPIA decision to cease grant in aid in 2009 was agreed with Ministers.

Crime: Fraud

Question

Asked by Lord Tebbit

The Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Neville-Jones): The police recorded crime statistics are based on an aggregate count of offences. Those crimes relating to fraudulent insurance claims would be recorded under the offence of "other fraud" and cannot be separately identified from the offences recorded within that classification.

Energy: Electricity

Questions

Asked by Lord Tebbit

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Energy and Climate Change (Lord Marland): The interconnector helps us meet peak demand greenly and cost-effectively. Our mix of electricity generation technologies ensures security of supply and we do not envisage a shortfall in the domestic power supply.

Asked by Lord Tebbit

Lord Marland: The table below shows electricity imported from, and exported, to France, by the United Kingdom in each of the past 10 years.

Imports from France (GWh)Exports to France (GWh)

2000

14,267

1

2001

10,563

193

2002

9,042

621

2003

5,000

2,873

2004

10,027

728

2005

11,159

765

2006

10,592

861

2007

8,562

2,016

2008

12,142

898

2009

6,524

3,296



6 Oct 2010 : Column WA19

Asked by Lord Ashcroft

Lord Marland: The Department of Energy and Climate Change does not publish retail energy price forecasts. It publishes oil, gas and coal price assumptions for the period till 2030, which are used in the department's analytical work. Wholesale electricity prices are an important driver of retail prices, and as part of DECC's updated energy and emissions projections, DECC produces wholesale electricity price projections which arise from the fossil fuel price assumptions.

Health: Dentistry

Question

Asked by Lord Colwyn

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The main risks of cross-infection in primary dental care arise from transmission from patient to patient by reusable instruments of blood-borne viruses (BBV), particularly hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The Spongiform Encephalitis Advisory Committee (SEAC) has also raised concerns about the potential for the creation of more cases of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease related to primary dental care. We do not collect data on these risks because the incubation periods of BBV diseases are so long, and the number of dental treatments so frequent, that it would be impossible to relate an individual infection to a specific course of treatment. However, it is estimated that in the United Kingdom there are about 83,000 people with HIV, over a quarter of whom are unaware of their infection, 180,000 with chronic hepatitis B (the level of undiagnosed infections is unknown), and 250,000 people with chronic hepatitis C infection, about a half of whom are unaware that they are infected.

Asked by Lord Colwyn

Earl Howe: Currently we are only requiring compliance with the essential quality requirements in the health technical memorandum. These add little to the advice sheet on infection control in dentistry issued by the British Dental Association with the support of the department in 2002.



6 Oct 2010 : Column WA20

Health: Needs Assessments

Questions

Asked by Baroness Cumberlege

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): Yes. Under Regulation 3C(1) of the NHS (Pharmaceutical Services) Regulations 1995 (as amended), which came into force in May 2010, primary care trusts have a statutory duty to complete and publish their pharmaceutical needs assessments by 1 February 2011.

Asked by Baroness Cumberlege

Earl Howe: We expect the requirement to complete and publish pharmaceutical needs assessments to continue in the new architecture and are considering where best responsibility will sit. Responses to the consultation on the White Paper Equity and Excellence: Liberating the NHS and supporting consultations will help inform our thinking.

Health: Ophthalmology

Question

Asked by Lord Wills

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The department has made no estimate of the cost to the National Health Service of treating vision loss in those whose giant cell arteritis was not diagnosed early.

Health: Rheumatology

Question

Asked by Lord Wills



6 Oct 2010 : Column WA21

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): All healthcare professionals are accountable, through their professional regulator, for keeping up to date with the professional guidance relevant to their area of clinical practice. The guidelines published by the British Society for Rheumatology and partner organisations on the management of giant cell arteritis and polymyalgia rheumatica are available on the society's website, and I understand that the society is sending copies of the quick reference guide relating to the guideline on giant cell arteritis to all primary medical care practices.

Houses of Parliament: Works of Art

Question

Asked by Lord Sheldon

The Chairman of Committees (Lord Brabazon of Tara): The works of art inventory is not categorised in this way, so it is not possible to provide the figures requested. The Curator of Works of Art may be able to answer any more specific queries.

People Trafficking

Question

Asked by Lord Hylton

The Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Neville-Jones): Work to prevent trafficking of persons into the United Kingdom is ongoing. Since May 2010 a new estimate of trafficking for sexual exploitation has been published by the Association of Chief Police Officers. The report will improve our understanding of the nature and scale of trafficking in England and Wales. Also, the Government have designated 18 October as Anti-Slavery Day. This will provide a focus for the efforts of non-governmental organisations to raise awareness.



6 Oct 2010 : Column WA22

Police: Crime Statistics

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

The Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Neville-Jones): The Audit Commission and the Wales Audit Office published a report in 2007 on police data quality in England and Wales. The report noted that there had been a sustained improvement in crime data quality since the introduction of the national crime recording standard in 2002. South Wales Police was rated as "fair" for crime data quality.

Policing and Crime

Question

Asked by Lord Corbett of Castle Vale

The Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Neville-Jones): The Government will publish estimates of the cost of the elections and other aspects of the police and crime commissioners policy in due course.

Schools: Standard Assessment Tests

Question

Asked by Lord Taylor of Warwick

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Hill of Oareford): We will review how the key stage 2 national curriculum tests should operate in future. We want to improve and strengthen the tests and ensure they are working in the best interests of schools, children, parents and the public.


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