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10 Oct 2011 : Column WA219



10 Oct 2011 : Column WA219

Written Answers

Monday 10 October 2011

Pensions

Questions

Asked by Lord Laird

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Work and Pensions (Lord Freud): The Department for Work and Pensions does not have policy responsibility for public service pension schemes and therefore does not hold the employee membership information for these schemes. HM Treasury has overall responsibility for public service pensions policy, but not for the administration and details of individual schemes: such data as requested may be held by the individual pension schemes.

Asked by Lord Boswell of Aynho

Lord Freud: The estimated saving from raising state pension age to 66 by April 2022 and:

(a) to 67 by 2025 compared with:

the current timetable for pension age is £96.2 billion; and

the timetable proposed in the Pensions Bill is £64.5 billion.

(b) to 67 by 2026 compared with:

the current timetable for pension age is £91.0 billion; and

the timetable proposed in the Pensions Bill is £59.2 billion.



10 Oct 2011 : Column WA220

Asked by Lord Boswell of Aynho

Lord Freud: (a) Changing state pension age to 66 by April 2026 is the same as the legislated baseline so no savings would be created.

(b) Raising state pension age to 66 by April 2022 and to 67 by April 2026 would create estimated savings of £26.1 billion (in 2011-12 prices) between 2020-21 and 2025-26 and £64.9 billion (in 2011-12 prices) between 2026-27 and 2035-36 compared to the current pension timetable.

This timetable would result in savings of just £1.1 billion (in 2011-12 prices) between 2016-17 and 2020-21. This is significantly lower than the savings of £11.1 billion (in 2011-12 prices) during the same period resulting from the Pensions Bill 2011 timetable.

South Sudan

Question

Asked by The Earl of Sandwich



10 Oct 2011 : Column WA221

Baroness Northover: Her Majesty's Government do not provide direct funding to South Sudanese non-governmental organisations. However we do fund three programmes that use South Sudanese non-governmental organisations to undertake peace-building activities or to dispense delivery of basic services. The three programmes are: the South Sudan Basic Services Fund, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) South Sudan Recovery Fund and the South Sudan Peace Building Programme.

The BSF has served 20 per cent of the national population (about 2 million people) through BSF funded primary health care clinics and 21 out of 31 targeted new schools have been built and 30,008 students now enrolled. Over 670,000 people have benefited from safe drinking water and improved sanitation through BSF programmes.



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Since the inception of round 2 small grants mechanism, 69 local organisations have received grants and have been trained in project management and proposal writing (43 in agriculture, 16 in education and 10 in water and sanitation) funded by the UNDP. The grants have focused on grassroots or localised initiatives in agriculture, education and water and sanitation in all 10 states in South Sudan.

Through the South Sudan Peace Fund approximately 5,494 people have participated in peace building and conflict mitigation activities such as dialogues, civic education courses and livelihoods support such as three pilot projects which work with demobilised women soldiers to assist their social reintegration in to host communities.

These programmes disbursed £6.3 million in 2009-10 and £6.0 million in 2010-11 to South Sudanese non-governmental organisations.


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