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9 Feb 2012 : Column WA83



9 Feb 2012 : Column WA83

Written Answers

Thursday 9 February 2012

Asylum Seekers

Question

Asked by Baroness Goudie

The Minister of State, Home Office (Lord Henley): The UK Border Agency records this information but it is not held in a format compatible with National Statistics protocols.

However, published statistics are available on a quarterly and annual basis which covers the number of unaccompanied asylum-seeking children granted discretionary leave. Between 2005 and 2010 the number of grants was 10,501.

Automotive Industry

Question

Asked by Baroness Gardner of Parkes

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Baroness Wilcox): Jaguar Land Rover's decision to locate its advanced engine plant in the UK is a vote of confidence in the UK's world-leading auto sector and our talented workforce. It is also recognition of what the Government have done to support sustainable growth through record investment in apprenticeships to improve our skills base and support for research and development.

Jaguar Land Rover and other automotive companies are in the best position to understand what skills are required for its sector. To that end, we are reforming the skills system, with apprenticeships at its heart, so that it is not led by government but by employers. We are radically simplifying the system to enable colleges and providers to respond to that need. This approach will secure a dynamic future for the automotive sector, and contribute to this country's return to economic growth.



9 Feb 2012 : Column WA84

Bahrain

Question

Asked by Lord Hylton

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Lord Howell of Guildford): Following publication of the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry report on 23 November, the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my right honourable friend the Member for Richmond (Yorks) (Mr Hague) spoke to the Crown Prince and has since been in regular contact with the Bahraini Foreign Minister to monitor government progress towards fully implementing the commission's recommendations.

The Prime Minister, my right honourable friend the Member for Witney (Mr Cameron), had a useful meeting with the King of Bahrain on 12 December to discuss plans for implementation, during which he urged swift delivery and offered UK expertise to help Bahrain in this process, in particular to improve the judicial system. The King welcomed this.

Similar messages were delivered by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my honourable friend the Member for North East Bedfordshire (Mr Burt), during his visit to Bahrain in mid-December.

Banking

Questions

Asked by Lord Myners

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Sassoon): My right honourable friend the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills has recently announced proposals aimed at improving the alignment of risk and reward in executive pay. These proposals include the expectation that in the future, remuneration committees will have to explain why they have used specific benchmarks and how they have taken into account employee earnings, including pay differentials, when setting pay.

The Government's shareholdings in the Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) and Lloyds Banking Group (LBG) are managed on a commercial and arm's-length basis by UK Financial Investments Ltd (UKFI), a company which is wholly owned by the Government. As shareholder representative, UKFI will exercise shareholder powers in accordance with good practice to protect the shareholder interest and encourage full and informative disclosures in compliance with all relevant reporting requirements.



9 Feb 2012 : Column WA85

Asked by Lord Oakeshott of Seagrove Bay

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Baroness Wilcox): The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills receives monthly figures on gross and net lending from the four UK banks who participated in the Merlin agreement.

Banks: Green Investment Bank

Questions

Asked by Baroness Smith of Basildon

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Baroness Wilcox): My right honourable friend the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills's Written Statement of 12 December explained that support for the Green Deal will be one of the priority sectors in the spending review period to 2015-16. This applies to both the Green Investment Bank (GIB) and UK Green Investment (UKGI). We expect to commence discussions shortly with potential providers of Green Deal finance. All investment decisions will be made against a double bottom line of green impact and financial return.

Asked by Lord Kennedy of Southwark

Baroness Wilcox: On 12 December 2011, this department published a document setting out the criteria that will be taken into account in reaching a decision on the Green Investment Bank's location. The document invited interested parties to self-assess their location against those criteria and submit relevant information for consideration. The deadline for submission of self-assessments was 30 January and we received submissions from 32 locations in the UK. All submissions are now being reviewed against the criteria set out in the December guidance document. The decision will be announced later this month.

Children Act 1989

Question

Asked by Lord Roberts of Llandudno



9 Feb 2012 : Column WA86

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord McNally): The Lord Chief Justice is the independent head of the judiciary in England and Wales. His responsibilities include maintaining appropriate arrangements for the welfare, training and guidance of the judiciary, within the resources made available by the Lord Chancellor.

There is no automatic arrangement by which judges receive feedback on the efficacy of orders made in private law proceedings once the proceedings have concluded. A judge will normally only receive further information if the case returns to court, or if one of the parties subsequently contacts the court.

When making, or varying, any order in private law proceedings under the Children Act 1989 the court is required by law to make the welfare of the child its paramount consideration. Any order made will be designed to meet this principle. The specific terms of the order will reflect the welfare needs of the child informed by the information before the court as to his or her family circumstances. In most private law cases, the judge is scrutinising and formalising agreements reached between the parties themselves during the course of the proceedings, in some cases facilitated by mediation. Such orders are made with the consent of the parties and relatively few cases proceed to a contested final hearing. The ability of the parents to work together co-operatively in compliance with the terms of the order will be a key factor in its efficacy.

In respect of contact orders specifically, however, it is possible for a judge to order monitoring of a contact order under the provisions of Section 11H of the Children Act 1989. The court can ask a Cafcass or CAFCASS Cymru officer to monitor compliance with the contact order, and such other matters as the court shall request. The officer will then report to the court on the matters concerned.

The court can also make a family assistance order requiring a Cafcass or CAFCASS Cymru officer to "advise, assist and befriend" a person involved in an order in private law proceedings under Part II of the Children Act 1989. The order can last up to 12 months and the officer can be required to report on such matters as the court shall direct in connection with any order under Section 8 of the Children Act 1989.

The Government agree in principle that there is little feedback available to judges once a case leaves court. In response to the final report of the Family Justice Review, the Government propose to carry out a small-scale pilot to test the benefits and assess the resource and time implications of case reviews. This is in line with the Munro review of child protection in England which recommends continuous learning, reflective practice and increased co-operation among agencies in the family justice system. The pilot will test a mechanism for providing structured feedback on the long-term outcomes of the decisions which are taken by the courts.



9 Feb 2012 : Column WA87

Children: Care

Question

Asked by Lord Roberts of Llandudno

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): There are no specific guidelines for National Health Service practitioners caring for a child who they believe is being denied a relationship with one of its parents but health professionals should refer to Working Together to Safeguard Children -a guide to inter-agency working to safeguard and protect the welfare of children (DCSF, March 2010) www.workingtogetheronline.co.uk/.

The guidance requires any person, and this includes health professionals, to refer children to social services if they think a child is in need or is suffering, or is likely to suffer, significant harm.

The local children's social care team will determine what action to take following the referral.

Civil Service: Retirement

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): The table below shows the average age of retirement from the Senior Civil Service for financial years 2004-05 to 2010-11. Data from before 1 April 2004 are not available.

Financial YearAverage Age

2004-05

55

2005-06

56

2006-07

55

2007-08

58

2008-09

60

2009-10

58

2010-11

55

It is not possible to provide figures for predecessor departments to Defra as these data are not available without incurring disproportionate cost.

Information about the average pension paid to retired senior civil servants is not held and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.



9 Feb 2012 : Column WA88

Civil Service: Staff

Question

Asked by Baroness Scott of Needham Market

Lord Wallace of Saltaire: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, Director General for ONS, to Baroness Scott, dated February 2012.

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking how many United Kingdom Civil Service jobs are currently located in (1) England, (2) Scotland, (3) Northern Ireland, and (4) Wales (HL15346).

Estimates of regional Civil Service employment are published annually by the Office for National Statistics on the National Statistics website. The data available refer to the survey reference date of 31 March 2011.

The following table provides the headcount of Home Civil Servants in post for England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales as at 31 March 2011.

Regional distribution of Civil Service employment 12
All employees
Headcount
Total

31 March 2011

England

404,043

Scotland

48,832

Wales

33,299

Northern Ireland

4,355

All employees

490,529

Source: Annual Civil Service Employment Survey

1 Workplace postcode data are used to derive geographical information

2 Excludes employees of the Northern Ireland Civil Service

Crime: Domestic Violence

Question

Asked by Baroness Gould of Potternewton

The Minister of State, Home Office (Lord Henley): The Home Office does not hold information on numbers of false claims of domestic violence. Investigating domestic violence is an operational matter for individual police forces.

Crime: Rioting

Question

Asked by Lord Hunt of Kings Heath



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The Minister of State, Home Office (Lord Henley): The Home Office does not make payments directly to individuals or businesses-this is the responsibility of insurers and police authorities. Insurers have settled 80 per cent of claims made by householders and have fully paid out, or made interim payments, to almost three-quarters of businesses affected by the riots.

Over half of all valid claims have now been settled by police authorities. Outstanding claims include issues where documents have not yet been produced. We are striving to contact all claimants to ensure that they receive the help available to them.

We are committed to reimbursing police authorities for the compensation they pay out, and it is in their interests to put in claims as swiftly as possible. Our key concern is to ensure that individuals and businesses receive the compensation to which they are entitled, and the majority already have.

Criminal Law Act 1977

Question

Asked by Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord McNally): The Home Office has not issued guidance to the police for this area of the law. The enforcement of the rights of displaced residential occupiers or protected intending occupiers as defined in Section 7 of the Criminal Law Act 1977 is an operational matter for individual forces.

Cyclists: Penalties

Question

Asked by Lord Stoddart of Swindon

Earl Attlee: Cycling on the footway became a fixed penalty offence in 1999. The fixed penalty was increased to the current level of £30 in 2000.

If pursued through the courts the current maximum fine is £500.

Democratic Republic of Congo

Question

Asked by Lord Avebury

The Minister of State, Home Office (Lord Henley): The UK Border Agency (UKBA) produces country of origin information (COI) reports on the 20 countries generating the most asylum claims in the UK.

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) report has not been updated since 2009 as it has not consistently featured in the top 20 asylum intake countries. However, where there is a specific operational need a report may be produced on countries outside the top 20. The UKBA's COI service is currently updating its report on DRC and this is scheduled for publication shortly. The report will include information on the treatment of failed asylum seekers returned to the DRC.

As regards the report Unsafe Return, relevant and reliable information received from published sources such as human rights organisations and non-government organisations regarding the treatment of failed asylum seekers on return would be incorporated in UKBA COI material. We will include reference to the Unsafe Return report, among other sources, in the forthcoming COI report.

The revised DRC COI report will be made available on the UKBA website: http://www.ukba.homeoffice. gov.uk/policyandlaw/guidance/coi/.

Education: Literacy

Question

Asked by Lord Empey

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Baroness Wilcox): The 2011 Skills for Life survey provides the most recent estimate of adult literacy (for people aged between 16 and 65 years old) in England, based on fieldwork conducted between May 2010 and February 2011. The headline findings of the survey were published in December 20111; table 1 below provides the information about the current distribution of literacy skill levels among this population, both in terms of proportions and counts.

Table 1: Literacy estimates among the adult population of England, 2011 (percentage and counts)
2011
%Margins of errorAdult Population estimate (million)

Entry Level 1 or below

5.0

(4.3 - 5.8)

1.7

Entry Level 2

2.1

(1.7 - 2.6)

0.7

Entry Level 3

7.8

(7.0 - 8.8)

2.7

Level 1

28.5

(27.0 - 29.9)

9.7

Level 2 or above

56.6

(55.0 - 58.2)

19.3

Entry Level 3 and below

14.9

(14 - 16)

5.1

Level 1 and above

85.1

(84 - 86)

29.0

Sample size (unweighted)/population size

5,824

(34.1 million)

Source: 2011 Skills for Life survey: headline findings



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The most recent available evidence on literacy levels across the United Kingdom is more dated, from the International Adult Literacy Survey 1994-982. This showed that 22 per cent of adults, aged 16-65 in the UK, had the equivalent of entry level 3 and below (ie IALS level 1) prose literacy3 and 23 per cent had the same level of document literacy4.

1 TNS-BMRB and AlphaPlus Consultancy Ltd. (November 2011) 2011 Skills for Life survey: headline findings, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, BIS research paper 57. Available online at: http://www.bis.gov.uk/assets/biscore/further-education-skills/docs/0-9/11-1367-2011-skills-for-life-survey-findings.pdf, accessed on 8/2/12.

2 OECD (2000) Literacy in the Information Age: final report of the international adult literacy survey, Statistics Canada.

3 Defined as the knowledge and skills needed to understand and use information from texts including editorials, news stories, brochures and instruction manuals.

4 Defined as the knowledge and skills required to locate and use information contained in various formats, including job applications, payroll forms, transportation schedules, maps, tables and charts.

Education: Literacy and Numeracy

Question

Asked by Lord Empey

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Baroness Wilcox): Further Education and Skills is a devolved matter and, as such, I can only reply in respect of England. From the 2011-12 academic year, FE colleges and providers have been given a single adult skills budget providing them with flexibility to respond to local learner and employer needs. Full government subsidy is provided for courses that support adults to gain basic literacy and numeracy qualifications.

Egypt

Question

Asked by Lord Hylton

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Lord Howell of Guildford): The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, my honourable friend the Member for North West Norfolk (Mr Bellingham), raised the case of the Swedish journalists with the Ethiopian Foreign Minister and Deputy Prime Minister, Hailemariam Desalgn, at the African Union summit on 26 January. Our ambassador in Addis Ababa also discussed the case with Prime Minister Meles on 9 January and handed over a letter from the Prime Minister, my right honourable friend the Member for Witney (Mr Cameron). The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my right honourable friend the Member for Richmond (Yorks) (Mr Hague) and the Secretary of State for International Development, my right honourable friend the Member for Sutton Coldfield (Mr Mitchell) have raised related issues, including about Ethiopian counterterrorism legislation, with Prime Minister Meles in contacts over the past three months. The European Union is currently developing a strategy on the way forward in this matter, with UK support.

Embryology

Question

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Baroness Wilcox): Government spend in the categories requested, for each year since 2002-03, is as follows:

AdultEmbryonicAdult*/Embryonic**Generic/Cell type not definedTotal

2002-03

£1,432,000

£1,941,000

£157,000

£59,000

£3,589,000

2003-04

£1,984,000

£2,321,000

£49,000

£167,000

£4,521,000

2004-05

£11,052,866

£9,605,000

£1,117,000

£381,000

£22,155,866

2005-06

£10,916,969

£13,366,031

£1,820,000

£512,000

£26,615,000

2006-07

£16,846,341

£19,399,539

£1,570,847

£1,127,000

£38,943,727

2007-08

£23,033,420

£17,918,300

£3,766,000

£937,000

£45,654,720

2008-09

£23,845,126

£20,779,088

£6,263,000

£1,254,000

£52,141,214

2009-10

£26,661,104

£19,948,258

£12,884,000

£840,000

£60,333,362

* A number of research projects involve both adult & embryonic cell types

** Not all organisations have been able to provide a breakdown in the categories requested.

Prior to 2002-03 comparable figures are not available.

The allocations under the spending review do not specify funding assigned to different areas of research.

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However, regenerative medicine, including embryonic and adult stem cell research, is a strategic research priority for the MRC, as outlined in Research Changes Lives: MRC Strategic Plan 2009-14. A planned regenerative medicine spend in the region of £130 million was set out for the spending review period in the MRC Delivery Plan 2011-12 to 2014-15. Both documents are available from the MRC's website at: www.mrc.ac.uk

In line with the agenda set out in the Delivery Plan, the MRC will continue to support all types of stem cell research and the level of future funding in embryonic and adult stem cell research will be dependent on the quality and strategic relevance of any proposals received.

The Cell Therapy Catapult, announced in the Strategy for UK Life Sciences, will be a unique centre where academics, businesses and clinicians will work together to focus on the commercial development of cutting-edge technologies in cell therapy. The centre will receive up to £10 million per annum of core funding from the Technology Strategy Board.

Ministers from the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills and Department of Health speak regularly about public health issues, including matters concerning research.

Energy: Costs

Question

Asked by Baroness Smith of Basildon

Baroness Stowell of Beeston: DECC Ministers and officials meet with energy companies on a regular basis to discuss market issues.

Ofgem is responsible for regulating gas and electricity supply, including matters related to prepayment meters. New rules introduced by Ofgem in 2009 to prevent unfair price differentials, such as those between different payment methods, mean that prepayment meter customers now pay, on average, £20 less than standard credit customers for their gas and electricity.

Energy: Feed-in Tariffs

Question

Asked by Baroness Smith of Basildon

Baroness Stowell of Beeston: Today, we published the full Government response to the consultation on tariffs for solar photovoltaic installations which closed on 23 December 2011.



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Energy: Green Deal

Question

Asked by Baroness Smith of Basildon

Baroness Stowell of Beeston: DECC's current estimates for the uptake of measures under the Green Deal can be found in the impact assessment, which was published alongside the Green Deal and ECO consultation document in November 2011.

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/consultations/green_deal/green_deal.aspx

We are currently considering responses to the consultation, which closed on 18 January, and the Government will be publishing their formal response in due course. This will be accompanied by an updated impact assessment.

Energy: Solar Photovoltaics

Question

Asked by Baroness Smith of Basildon

Baroness Stowell of Beeston: Phase 2 of the feed-in tariffs (FITs) scheme review, published today, sets out several proposals for consultation in relation to community schemes, including seeking views on an appropriate definition of "community".

EU: Fiscal Union

Question

Asked by Lord Pearson of Rannoch

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Sassoon): The Government have a number of legal concerns regarding the use of the EU institutions in the inter-governmental treaty on stability, co-ordination and governance in the economic and monetary union.

However, the Government want the eurozone to do what is necessary to solve the crisis as long as it does not damage the UK's national interest. The Government are, therefore, reserving their position on use of the EU institutions in the new agreement. It is clear that they cannot encroach on the competencies of the EU, or justify measures that undermine the single market.

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The Government will be watching developments closely and will take action if the UK's national interests are threatened.

EU: Israel Association Agreement

Question

Asked by Lord Hylton

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Lord Howell of Guildford): The UK is clear that the human rights clauses of the European Union (EU)-Israel Association Agreement are an important part of the framework governing co-operation between the EU and Israel.

The issue of the human rights clauses of the European-Israel Association Agreement was raised at the EU-Israel informal working group on human rights on 13 September 2011. It will be discussed again at the next meeting of the group, currently scheduled for September 2012.

The first meeting of the EU-Israel sub-committee on economic and financial matters took place in Jerusalem on 23 January 2012. The framework of the meeting is to conduct a regular economic dialogue, as foreseen by the EU-Israel Association Agreement, which allows an in-depth discussion of the economic situation in Israel and the EU, assessing the risks and opportunities for both economies. The issue of human rights was not raised at this meeting as it was not directly pertinent to the technical economic matters being discussed.

However, the issue of human rights is likely to be raised at the next EU-Israel Association Committee meeting which is planned for May 2012. The association committee reviews the progress of all sub-committees and working groups operating under the EU-Israel Association Agreement.

European Single Market

Question

Asked by Lord Stoddart of Swindon

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Baroness Wilcox): No. A full list of regulations and directives considered relevant to the operation of the single market would run to several thousand and could only be achieved at disproportionate cost. The information is available from the following European Commission webpage: www.eur-lex.europa.eu/en/legis/latest/index.htm.



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Exports and Imports

Question

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Baroness Wilcox): There are controls on the import and export of a wide range of goods. These controls are contained in a large number of Acts and statutory instruments which are the responsibility of a number of departments. As a result, the information sought is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

I am not aware of any Acts or statutory instruments falling within the responsibility of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills that regulate re-imports or re-exports. However, as the noble Lord is aware, the assessment process for strategic export licence applications takes full account of the risk of the goods being re-exported or diverted to undesirable end-uses or end-users. It would be an offence for a UK exporter knowingly to make a false statement regarding the ultimate destination of the goods when exporting them from the UK.

Extradition Act 2003

Question

Asked by Lord Maginnis of Drumglass

The Minister of State, Home Office (Lord Henley): Further to the Written Answer given on 25 January, the Extradition Act 2003 provides for the requested person's human rights to be considered by the court during the extradition hearing. If the district judge in the UK decides that a person's extradition to another jurisdiction would result in a breach of that person's human rights, he must order the person's discharge. That decision is subject to review on appeal to the High Court.

Firearms: Home Office Firearms Forms Working Group

Question

Asked by Lord Dear



9 Feb 2012 : Column WA97

The Minister of State, Home Office (Lord Henley): The Home Office Firearms Forms Working Group (HOFFWG) is scheduled to meet in February, which is the date all working group members could attend.

Government Departments: Bonuses

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

The Advocate-General for Scotland (Lord Wallace of Tankerness): Staff in the Scotland Office are on secondment, mainly from the Scottish Government or the Ministry of Justice. Staff may be eligible for non-consolidated performance payments in different ways. First, through end of year performance payments under their parent bodies' performance management arrangements, and in the case of the Senior Civil Service, within a common framework set by the Cabinet Office. Depending on these arrangements, and departmental pay remits, over each of the next three years, all staff may be eligible for end of year performance payments. However, it is not possible to provide an estimate of such costs as pay arrangements have not been settled for forward years.

Secondly, under Scotland Office reward and recognition arrangements, staff below SCS are eligible for non-consolidated performance payments or small and instantaneous awards, eg vouchers, in recognition of special effort, achievement and commitment. Over the past seven years such awards made by the Scotland Office have varied in value between £750 and £25. It is not possible to estimate future spend on these arrangements.

Government Departments: Staff

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

The Minister of State, Home Office (Lord Henley): The Home Office does not hold the information requested.



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Government: Ministerial Duties

Question

Asked by Lord Avebury

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Lord Howell of Guildford): During his visit to Bahrain the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my honourable friend the Member for North East Bedfordshire (Mr Burt) met senior members of the Government, including the Crown Prince and Prime Minister.

Mr Burt also hosted a series of roundtable discussions with representatives from the opposition, business, media and civil society, including those concerned with human rights.

He made it clear to all groups that they should fully seize this moment for reconciliation and broader reform.

In addition, Mr Burt attended a reception for the British Community and visited the UK maritime component and met officers serving in the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary.

Mr Burt did not meet any members from the Bahrain Centre for Human Rights before or during his visit.

Government: Remuneration Contracts

Question

Asked by Lord Stoddart of Swindon

Lord Wallace of Saltaire: Remuneration contracts are subject to Employment Law. The precise legal status of terms and conditions is dependent on the contract of employment between the employer and the individual being appointed.

Immigration

Question

Asked by The Earl of Sandwich

The Minister of State, Home Office (Lord Henley): The requested information is unavailable.



9 Feb 2012 : Column WA99

A figure for the number of people detained as at 1 January 2012 could only be obtained at disproportionate cost. The equivalent figure for 31 December 2011 will be published on 23 February 2012. Figures are published annually on 31 March, 30 June, 30 September.

The number of people entering detention in 2011 and the number of people removed on leaving detention in 2011, by country of nationality, will be published on 23 February 2012.

Published figures on people in detention relate to those solely detained under Immigration Act powers in immigration removal centres, short-term holding facilities and pre-departure accommodation and exclude those recorded as entering police cells, prison service establishments and short-term holding rooms at ports and airports (for less than 24 hours), those recorded as detained under both criminal and immigration powers and their dependants.

The Home Office publishes statistics on detention, solely under Immigration Act powers on a quarterly and annual basis, within Immigration Statistics, which are available from the Library of the House and from the Home Office's Science, Research and Statistics website at: http://homeoffice.gov.uk/science-research/research-statistics/.

2011 figures will be available on 23 February 2012 in Immigration Statistics October-December 2011.

Iran

Question

Asked by Lord Stoddart of Swindon

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Lord Howell of Guildford): As the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) most recent report on the Iranian nuclear programme makes clear, Iran has conducted activities relevant, and in some cases specific, to the development of nuclear weapons. Much of the evidence that the IAEA presents relates to activities prior to 2003; but the IAEA also presents significant evidence, from multiple sources, indicating that some of these activities have continued beyond this point. Iran also continues to expand its stockpile of near-20 per cent enriched uranium and to expand its capability to produce this material far beyond that required for its declared intended civilian use, all in violation of United Nations Security Council resolutions. These activities bring the prospect of an Iranian nuclear weapon closer, and cause us grave concerns about the ultimate purpose of the Iranian nuclear programme.

Justice: Legal Fees

Question

Asked by Baroness Smith of Basildon

Baroness Stowell of Beeston: We estimate that the Government have incurred costs of approximately £66,400. This includes the cost of approximately £58,000 up to the point of judgment in the High Court and a further £8,400 to include the recent hearing in the Court of Appeal.

If the Supreme Court agrees to hear our case then we will incur more costs, but it is not possible to estimate this cost at this stage. If the Supreme Court ultimately finds in our favour, we will expect to recover all or a substantial proportion of our costs.

We are doing this to protect consumers' bills. The annual cost to consumers if we did not act could be £100 million per year-more than 1,000 times our legal costs to date. The cost of defending ourselves in court pales in comparison to the £1.5 billion additional lifetime cost if we do not act.

Khader Adnan Mohammad Musa

Questions

Asked by Lord Hylton

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Lord Howell of Guildford): We are aware of the case of Mr Khader Adnan Mohammad Musa. On 31 January 2012 Mr Musa was transferred to Mayanei HaYeshua Medical Centre in central Israel after 45 days on hunger strike. The Israeli non-governmental organisation, Physicians for Human Rights, has had access to Mr Musa to advise him on the impact of the hunger strike on his health. Israeli authorities assess his medical condition to be satisfactory and say that if necessary he will be given medical treatment. Other Palestinian detainees have also started a hunger strike in solidarity with Mr Musa.

We have raised our concerns with the Israeli authorities about ensuring that prisoners in detention have access to independent medical advice, that family visitation rights are upheld and that they have access to legal advice and are given a fair and open trial.

Our officials in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem have been instructed to monitor the situation closely.

Asked by Lord Hylton



9 Feb 2012 : Column WA101

Lord Howell of Guildford: We are in regular discussion with the European Union regarding Palestinians held in administrative detention and co-ordinate our monitoring and lobbying on the ground with European Union (EU) partners in both Jerusalem and Tel Aviv.

Along with our colleagues in the EU we are monitoring the case of Mr Khader Adnan Mohammad Musa and will continue to make representations to Israel regarding our concerns about the situation of Palestinians in Israeli detention.

Middle East and North Africa

Question

Asked by Lord Hylton

Baroness Northover: Information on African Development Bank (AfDB), International Finance Corporation (IFC) and World Bank disbursements during the past six months to increase employment in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) is currently not available. Where information on aggregate disbursements or commitments for calendar year 2011 is available, it is shown below. Although these figures cannot be disaggregated to provide an exact figure on spend to increase employment, a large share is expected to contribute directly or indirectly to job creation.

the World Bank disbursed US$ 1.56 billion to the MENA region during the period 1 July to 31 January 2011, of which US$ 510 million was for Tunisia;the IFC committed $1.314 billion to the MENA region during the period 1 January to 31 December 2011, of which $29.9 million was for Tunisia; andthe AfDB disbursed $618 million for Tunisia during the period 1 January to 31 December 2011.

More information on disbursements by country and sectors will be available in AfDB's annual report which is expected to be published in May, and in the World Bank and IFC annual reports which will be published by October.

All three institutions have approved a number of new investments over the past 12 months to boost job creation in the MENA region. These include: i) World Bank and AfDB loans totalling $100 million to increase access to small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) finance in Tunisia; ii) an IFC $200 million loan and $50 million equity investment in an Egyptian construction company; iii) a World Bank $250 million development policy loan to the Government of Jordan; and iv) an AfDB €20 million investment in an SME equity fund for Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya.



9 Feb 2012 : Column WA102

Police: Community Support Officers

Question

Asked by Lord Condon

The Minister of State, Home Office (Lord Henley): The latest published police personnel statistics shows that there were 15,469 full-time equivalent police community support officers employed in the 43 English and Welsh police forces on 30 September 2011.

These statistics were published on 26 January 2012 in the Police Service Strength England and Wales, 30 September 2011 statistical bulletin, available online at: http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk.

Police: Overseas Assignments

Question

Asked by Lord Avebury

The Minister of State, Home Office (Lord Henley): There are currently no British police officers on assignment in Bahrain.

Questions for Written and Oral Answer

Question

Asked by Lord Myners

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Baroness Wilcox): My noble friend Lord Green of Hurstpierpoint was appointed Minister of State for Trade and Investment on 11 January 2011. From that date to the end of January 2012, Lord Green has answered 45 Written Questions and one oral Question relating to trade promotion and the operations of UK Trade and Investment (UKTI).

In my role as Parliamentary Secretary, I lead on all other Business, Innovation and Skills issues in the Lords, assisted by Baroness Verma on higher education matters. I have answered a total of 409 Written Questions and 39 oral Questions during the same period.



9 Feb 2012 : Column WA103

Questions for Written Answer

Questions

Asked by Lord Laird

The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (Lord Strathclyde): The office of the Leader of the House of Lords uses the data relating to Questions for Written Answer submitted by government departments to monitor each department's performance in answering QWAs within 10 working days. The overall volume of QWAs tabled to each department is not monitored centrally. Information supplied by departments in relation to their performance during 2011 will be placed in the Library of the House.

Asked by Lord Laird



9 Feb 2012 : Column WA104

The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (Lord Strathclyde): The Leader of the House of Lords requests information from government departments relating to their performance in responding to Questions for Written Answers on a monthly basis. Information submitted by government departments in relation to their performance during 2011 will be placed in the Library of the House.

Railways: Rail Cards

Question

Asked by Baroness Scott of Needham Market

Earl Attlee: There are no current plans for a single, centrally developed ITSO smart rail card. The Government strategy is to roll out ITSO-compliant smart ticketing on rail incrementally through the re-franchising process. To accelerate the roll-out, the Chancellor in the Autumn Statement has provided extra funding of £45 million in respect of smart ticketing on rail in the South East. Where franchises have already been let with an ITSO ticketing requirement the franchisee owns and manages their smart cards.

Oyster cards are not ITSO-compliant. However a project is currently under way to equip the London Oyster estate with the capability to read and accept ITSO products.

Safeguarding Children

Question

Asked by Baroness Walmsley



9 Feb 2012 : Column WA105

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Hill of Oareford): The Government are considering the recommendations made in Sir Roger's report.

Schools: Academies

Question

Asked by Lord Willis of Knaresborough

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Hill of Oareford): So far 1,629 schools have been approved to open as academies. There are currently 232 schools which have applied to convert awaiting approval. Further details are available on the DfE website at http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/leadership/typesofschools/academies/a0069811/open-academies-map-and-schools-submitting-applications.

This is a demand-driven programme that responds to school applications to convert and therefore we do not estimate how many might have converted by the end of the current Parliament.

Schools: Admissions

Questions

Asked by Lord Adonis

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Hill of Oareford): The School Admissions Code, which came into force on 1 February, gives more freedom to schools to increase their published admission number (PAN) to respond to parental demand. Schools that are their own admission authority (foundation schools, voluntary aided schools, academies and trust schools) are not required, if setting the same

9 Feb 2012 : Column WA106

or a higher PAN than previously, to consult on that number. Schools for which the local authority are the admissions authority (community schools and voluntary controlled (VC) schools) can increase their PAN through discussions with the local authority. If the governing body of a community or VC school feel the local authority has set a PAN that they disagree with, they can object to the schools adjudicator.

There is no requirement in legislation or in academy funding agreements for former maintained schools converting to become academies to agree their admission arrangements or admission numbers with the Secretary of State on conversion: they simply retain their previously determined admission arrangements and numbers. Nor are academies required to agree any subsequent changes, post-opening, with the Secretary of State. Instead, they are required by their funding agreements to comply with the provisions of the School Admissions Code. This allows academies to make changes to their admission arrangements and numbers following the same rules as all other own admission authority schools must follow when setting and varying their admission arrangements.

Consequently, the Secretary of State has neither approved nor rejected any changes to admission numbers for schools that have converted to become academies.

Schools: Profit-making

Question

Asked by Lord Willis of Knaresborough

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Hill of Oareford): The existing legislative framework would allow any school, whether an academy, free school or maintained school to outsource the management of, and teaching at, that school to a third party, which could include a for-profit company. Under such arrangements, the academy trust or the governing body of a maintained school remain legally responsible for the running of the school and manage the contract accordingly. Academy trusts must be established on a non-profit-making basis and use all income and assets for the charitable purpose of the trust.

Schools: Pupil Premium

Question

Asked by Lord Bradley

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Hill of Oareford): The pupil premium was introduced in April 2011 and allocations have so

9 Feb 2012 : Column WA107

far been made for the 2011-12 financial year only. Pupil premium funding is provided in respect of pupils known to be eligible for free school meals (FSM), children in care who have been continuously looked after for at least six months and children whose parents are serving in the Armed Forces, known as service children.

In Greater Manchester there were 81,650 pupils on the January 2011 school censuses recorded as known to be eligible for FSM or recorded as service children who qualified for the pupil premium. This was approximately 22 per cent of pupils in Greater Manchester.

9 Feb 2012 : Column WA108

Annex A provides this breakdown for each of the parliamentary constituencies in Greater Manchester, and the proportion of pupils they represent.

The total number of pupils eligible for the pupil premium in Greater Manchester and all its parliamentary constituencies may be higher, but it is not possible to identify the number of pupils in each parliamentary constituency recorded as being in care or recorded in the alternative provision census as, in both cases, the returns are provided at local authority level rather than at establishment level.

State-Funded Primary, Secondary and Special Schools, and Pupil Referral Units (1)(2)(3)(4):
Number of Pupils Eligible for the Pupil Premium on 2011-12 (9)*
By Parliamentary Constituency in Greater Manchester
Total Pupil Premium
Number on roll (5)Total Pupils eligible for the Pupil Premium (6) (7) (8)Proportion of Pupils in each Parliamentary constituency eligible for the Pupil Premium

England (8) (9)

6,765,030

1,260,270

18%

Greater Manchester

363,205

81,650

22%

Altrincham and Sale West

14,737

1,160

8%

Ashton-under-Lyne

13,325

2,800

21%

Blackley and Broughton

15,354

5,350

35%

Bolton North East

13,057

2,590

20%

Bolton South East

15,189

3,690

24%

Bolton West

11,934

2,250

19%

Bury North

13,404

1,890

14%

Bury South

12,497

2,050

16%

Cheadle

14,492

1,310

9%

Denton and Reddish

11,800

2,180

18%

Hazel Grove

9,322

1,240

13%

Heywood and Middleton

13,348

3,220

24%

Leigh

14,159

2,490

18%

Makerfield

14,177

2,000

14%

Manchester Central

12,420

5,750

46%

Manchester, Gorton

14,648

5,190

35%

Manchester, Withington

12,336

3,260

26%

Oldham East and Saddleworth

15,538

3,050

20%

Oldham West and Royton

17,817

5,060

28%

Rochdale

17,023

4,690

28%

Salford and Eccles

12,201

3,710

30%

Stalybridge and Hyde

13,331

2,690

20%

Stockport

8,690

1,870

21%

Stretford and Urmston

13,470

2,410

18%

Wigan

13,262

2,550

19%

Worsley and Eccles South

13,568

3,360

25%

Wythenshawe and Sale East

12,109

3,890

32%

Notes:

Total parliamentary constituency pupil numbers rounded to the nearest 10.

1. Includes middle schools as deemed.

2. Includes primary academies.

3. Includes city technology colleges and secondary academies.

4. Includes maintained special schools, excludes general hospital schools and non-maintained special schools.

5. Full-time equivalent (FTE) pupils in year groups R-11 (where National Curriculum year-groups do not apply pupils aged 4 to 15). For all those aged 5 and over includes sole or dual main registrations only. In Pupil Referral Units, FTE pupils aged 4 (all registration types) and headcount of pupils aged 5 to 15 (sole or dual main registrations as well as pupils who are registered with other providers and further education colleges).

6. Full-time equivalent (FTE) number of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals in year groups R-11, (where National Curriculum year groups do not apply pupils aged 4 to 15). For all those aged 5 and over includes sole or dual main registrations only. In Pupil Referral Units, FTE pupils aged 4 (all registration types) and headcount of pupils aged 5 to 15 (sole or dual main registrations as well as pupils who are registered with other providers and further education colleges) known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals.



9 Feb 2012 : Column WA109

7. Full-time equivalent (FTE) number of pupils in State-Funded Primary, State-Funded Secondary and Maintained Special Schools recorded on roll as service children on the January 2011 school census in year groups R-11 (where National Curriculum year groups do not apply pupils aged 4 to 15). For all those aged 5 and over includes sole or dual main registrations only.

8. There may be discrepancies between the sum of constituent items and totals as shown.

9. It is not possible to determine the number of parliamentary constituency pupils recorded on the alternative provision census or recorded as looked-after children as they are both local authority returns, and not an establishment level return. Therefore, this figure will be lower then the corresponding figure on the local authority table.

(*) The numbers are based on the location of the school and not where the schools are funded.

South Sudan

Question

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

Baroness Northover: Britain is playing a lead role in providing emergency relief to Jonglei and other states in South Sudan. In December 2011, the Secretary of State approved a two-year package of support for the International Committee of the Red Cross and the Common Humanitarian Fund (CHF) in South Sudan. UK support to the extended 2011 CHF and the new 2012 CHF will assist in providing emergency relief to Jonglei and other states over the coming months.

According to the latest information from the UN Office for the Co-ordination of Humanitarian Affairs, dated 30 January, 141,787 people have been registered as affected by the latest conflict in Jonglei state, and a further 95,889 have been reported as in need. Registration and reported numbers are being verified and assessments are ongoing. The international community, including the UK through its support to the CHF, is providing food and other emergency assistance to affected areas; 78,883 people have received food aid to date.

Squatting

Question

Asked by Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer



9 Feb 2012 : Column WA110

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord McNally): The information requested is not available. Although we hold data on the number of possession orders granted by the county courts in the London area, these do not provide a reliable indicator of the number of evictions from squatted properties which followed a court order.

Statutory Instruments

Questions

Asked by Lord Laird

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Baroness Wilcox): The information requested by the noble Lord is not held centrally within the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS). The Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments (JCSI) publish annual departmental returns, which list by department, the number of statutory instruments reported by it as being, in its opinion, defective. Copies of these reports are available in the Library of the House. Where an order requires a reprint, the Stationery Office issues this free of charge to all known recipients, with the actual costs being met by BIS Legal Directorates.

Asked by Lord Laird

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): Since 1988, 94 correcting instruments have been made and issued free of charge to purchasers of the statutory instrument (SI). This covers SIs laid by Defra or its predecessor departments-where the policy responsibility remains with Defra. Defra is in the process of compiling a list of legislation made by Defra or its predecessor departments, with current records suggesting that more than 2000 SIs in total were made over this period. Cost records are available for 70 of the 94 replacement instruments and date from 1997. The total cost of these 70 was £17,537 and met by the department. Information as to the reason for SIs being reprinted is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost, if at all, given the timescales involved.



9 Feb 2012 : Column WA111

Sudan

Question

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

Baroness Northover: Humanitarian organisations are currently providing relief assistance to approximately 110,000 people who have been displaced from Abyei. The continued presence of unauthorised forces and the risk of landmines continue to deter the return of those displaced by conflict and limit the activity of humanitarian organisations in Abyei itself. Several United Nation agencies have returned to Abyei town, including UNICEF (the UN Children's Fund), the World Health Organisation, and the UN High Commission for Refugees. Most of the humanitarian international non-governmental organisations have been operating out of Agok, across the Kiir River in South Sudan, since 2008 and have not had a sustained presence in Abyei town.



9 Feb 2012 : Column WA112

Tunisia

Question

Asked by Lord Hylton

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Lord Howell of Guildford): The UK is working hard to support the transition to democracy in Tunisia. Our bilateral efforts have focused on the Arab Partnership programme which provides a wide range of UK-led assistance, including support for visits of UK experts from Parliament and the BBC. The work of the British Council in Tunisia builds links with Tunisian civil society and young people in Tunisia. We also fund scholarships for the best Tunisian students to study in the UK, through the Chevening Scholarship programme.

We welcome the commitment that the Tunisian Government, Constituent Assembly and civil society have made to dialogue and to establishing a national consensus on the way forward for the country.


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