Question

Asked by Lord Higgins

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is the total value of the gilt-edged securities purchased by the Bank of England as part of its policy of quantitative easing; what is the annual income from those assets; and how those assets are treated in the Bank of England's accounts.[HL826]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Sassoon): Quantitative easing is implemented through the Asset Purchase Facility (APF). APF transactions are undertaken by a subsidiary company of the Bank of England, the Bank of England Asset Purchase Facility Fund Ltd (BEAPFF). As the Bank of England annual report explains, the BEAPFF accounts are not consolidated in the Bank's financial statements, as the Bank has no economic interest in its activities. The BEAPFF borrows from the Bank to pay for the purchases it makes. The Bank's loan to the BEAPFF appears as an asset on the balance sheet of the banking department of the Bank of England.

To ensure that the BEAPFF is operated in an open and transparent manner, the Bank publishes a quarterly report on the transactions as part of the facility and an annual report which contains the financial statement of the facility. These can be found on the bank of England's website: http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/markets/Pages/apf/default.aspx.

The BEAPFF has purchased £325 billion of gilts to date, details of which, including the nominal value of the gilts, coupon rates and maturities of the specific gilts held, are also available on the Bank's website.

The 2010-11 BEAPFF annual report stated that the BEAPFF held £11.8 billion of cash holdings at the balance sheet date, primarily representing coupons received (2010: £3.8 billion).

The 2011-12 BEAPFF annual report will be published in due course.

Food: Retailers

Questions

Asked by Lord Harrison

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they will review competition policy to ensure that it supports retail diversity and entry to markets for new food businesses.[HL993]

28 Jun 2012 : Column WA99

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Baroness Wilcox): Following a review and consultation in 2011, the Government announced reforms to the public competition framework on 15 March 2012, which will help businesses, consumers and the economy. As part of the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill, we now intend to create a single Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) and modernise its competition toolkit with the aim of:

improving the quality of decisions and strengthening the regime;supporting the competition authorities in taking forward the right competition cases; andimproving the speed and predictability for business.

It will be for the CMA, as responsible competition authority, to decide where to prioritise its resources.

The Government are committed to supporting high streets and town centres, as evidenced by our response to the recommendations of the Mary Portas review of the high street, published on 30 March 2012. In addition, the new National Planning Policy Framework, published by the Government on 26 March 2012, states that, in drawing up local plans, local planning authorities should promote competitive town centres that provide customer choice and a diverse retail offer.

Asked by Lord Harrison

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what recent discussions Ministers have had with large retailers on provision of local food in stores.[HL994]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): The Government encourage the provision of regional and local food in retailer stores at every opportunity. Retailers respond to the demands of their customers. Growing consumer demand for local food is reflected in the increasing availability of regional and local food in the stores of all the major retailers.

The Government want to enhance the competitiveness and resilience of the whole food chain to ensure a secure, environmentally sustainable and healthy supply of food with improved standards of animal welfare. The Government's principal role is encouraging and enabling to ensure we have a thriving, competitive and sustainable agri-food sector rather than directing the commercial decisions taken by specific retailers.

Food: Strategy

Question

Asked by Lord Harrison

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what support and guidance they are providing to local authorities to help them deliver food strategies.[HL996]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): I recognise the benefits that the marketing of regional and local food can bring to both producers and consumers alike and we want to encourage innovation in the sector. Recently, Defra and the Technology Strategy Board held an innovation summit to increase awareness of the innovation support mechanisms which are available to the food micro, small and medium- sized businesses.

28 Jun 2012 : Column WA100

Defra support for local food chain initiatives in England has come mainly from the Rural Development Programme for England (RDPE). This funding has supported initiatives including support for local food marketing linked to tourism activity, individual food producers and retail outlets, food hubs and farmers' markets. Support will continue to be available through the new RDPE nationally consistent schemes.

Last September, we published the Social Enterprise Action Research (SEAR) Report on Community Food Enterprises. This report (co-funded by Defra and the Cabinet Office) confirmed that across the country there are a range of local food groups of different sizes and membership emerging, often bringing together growers, processors and small food businesses. We welcome the development of these groups and the many benefits they can bring to producers and the local community, particularly to support local growth, but recognise that with the recent changes to the regional tier and closure of RDAs, it is for local communities and local economic partnerships to decide where and how initiatives of this nature develop.

It is for local authorities to take the strategic decisions that are best for them and their areas. The National Planning Policy Framework, which came into effect on 27 March, requires local planning authorities to take into account the economic and other benefits of the best and most versatile agricultural land when making planning decisions. The Government are considering how to take forward planning guidance across a range of matters. In deciding whether new guidance is needed to support operation of the framework, we will have regard to all the submissions about guidance which came in as part of the response to last year's consultation on national planning policy.

Food: Sustainable Food

Question

Asked by Lord Harrison

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether, as part of their review of planning guidance, they will consider new guidance to provide stronger support for a sustainable food system.[HL995]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): The Government are considering how to take forward planning guidance across a range of matters. In doing so we are considering carefully all of the submissions that have been made in response to our consultation on the draft national planning policy framework which asked for views about supporting guidance.

Government Departments: Apprentices

Questions

Asked by Lord Adonis

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what was the total number of staff employed within the private offices of ministers and the permanent secretary at HM Treasury on 1 June; and how many of them were (1) under the age of 21, (2) apprentices under the age of 21, and (3) apprentices over the age of 21. [HL905]

28 Jun 2012 : Column WA101

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many apprentices (1) under the age of 21, and (2) over the age of 21, were employed within HM Treasury on 1 June, excluding agencies and non-departmental public bodies.[HL906]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Sassoon): Over recent years, HM Treasury has not employed apprentices. This Government want this to change. It will be actively supporting the new government scheme. A recent apprentice recruitment campaign has resulted in five new recruits, all of whom are under the age of 21.

On 1 June 2012, there were 37 staff employed in the private offices of Ministers and the Permanent Secretary at HM Treasury. None was an apprentice or under the age of 21. Apprentices have been recruited to fill existing vacancies. At the present time, none will be placed in Ministers' private offices.

Government Departments: Interns

Question

Asked by Lord Willis of Knaresborough

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many interns were taken on by each government department in (1) 2009–10, (2) 2010–11, and (3) 2011–12. [HL948]

Baroness Warsi: The Civil Service Fast Stream Summer Diversity Programme placed 118 interns into departments in 2009-10, 74 in 2010-11 and 129 interns in 2011-12.

In 2010-11 the Summer Diversity Programme was complemented by two further programmes to form the cross-Whitehall Internship Programme. The two week programme for year 12 college students placed 62 interns into departments. The one day internship event for year 9 students provided 97 students with an overview of the Civil Service to raise students’ aspirations.

Outside this programme, departments may run their own schemes or offer placements. As this would be a matter for individual departments to determine, a figure is not held centrally.

In 2012 the Deputy Prime Minister launched the social mobility strategy, “Opening Doors, Breaking Barriers”. The cross-Whitehall Internship Programme reduces barriers that prevent young people participating by providing successful residential candidates with accommodation, travel and a weekly training allowance for the duration of their placement.

Overseas Territories

Question

Asked by Lord Ashcroft

To ask Her Majesty’s Government when they intend to publish their White Paper on the overseas territories.[HL814]

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Lord Howell of Guildford): I refer the noble Lord to the Written Ministerial Statement made today.

28 Jun 2012 : Column WA102

Pensions

Question

Asked by Lord Jones of Cheltenham

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how much was spent in the latest year for which figures are available on publicising and advertising the policy that United Kingdom citizens in receipt of a state pension whilst resident in countries where that pension is not uprated can claim a temporary uprating to cover the period of their visit to the United Kingdom or another country where pension levels are uprated; and whether they propose to include relevant contact details for such claims in United Kingdom passports. [HL943]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Work and Pensions (Lord Freud): Where a person claimed a UK pension from overseas, a leaflet was included with the entitlement notice. This leaflet gave specific information on the availability of uprates for periods of temporary residence in the UK and certain other countries.

This leaflet was removed in 2011. However, the same information is now included in the notice of entitlement issued when a UK pension is awarded.

Information on all aspects of payment of UK pensions overseas is available from the DWP's international pension centre. The contact details are available on the Direct.gov website at: http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/DI1/Directories/Useful ContactsByCategory/Over50sContacts/DG_178684.

No information on the expenditure involved, concerning the leaflet and dealing with queries, is available.

The Identity and Passport Service has no plans to include pension information in United Kingdom passports.

Prosperity Fund

Question

Asked by Lord Donoughue

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how much the Foreign and Commonwealth Office has spent through the Prosperity Fund throughout the various countries where it operates.[HL879]

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Lord Howell of Guildford): The Prosperity Fund seeks to advance our prosperity agenda by opening markets, ensuring access to resources and promoting sustainable global growth in key emerging markets. In 2011-12, the fund's first year, the Prosperity Fund allocated 98% of its £19,402,080 spend to the following 14 target markets and multipliers:

China

£4,703,535

Brazil

£3,566,111

India

£2,426,108

Mexico

£ 1,899,944

South Africa

£ 1,443,197

Indonesia

£997,111

Wider Latin America

£842,439

Russia

£498,118

28 Jun 2012 : Column WA103

South East Asia

£652,903

Middle East (Saudi Arabia, the Gulf and Iran)

£499,385

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Outreach programme (Iraq, Kazakhstan, Egypt and Tunisia)

£551,799

Turkey

£342,073

Japan

£301,279

South Korea

£262,565

The remaining 2% financed a range of other ad hoc, smaller projects in a number of countries including the UK.

Railways: BRB (Residuary) Ltd

Question

Asked by Lord Berkeley

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Earl Attlee on 18 June (WA 279), what is the cost of transferring landholdings from BRB (Residuary) Ltd to London and Continental Railways Ltd; and what interest the latter has in the site in Uckfield, West Sussex.[HL930]

Earl Attlee: The transfer of landholdings from BRB (Residuary) (BRBR) to London and Continental Railways Limited (LCR) will not incur any specific cost beyond that already due to be incurred in the abolition of BRBR. As a residuary board, it has always been the Government’s intention to wind-up BRBR at the appropriate time. To do so now, by way of the Public Bodies Act 2011, means that this can be achieved without incurring the significant conveyancing costs that would be involved in a private transfer to LCR.

LCR currently has no property interest in the Uckfield site.

Republic of Ireland: Financial Support

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Statement by Lord Sassoon on 11 June (WS 120), what are the current, past and proposed rates of interest charged on the bilateral loan to the Republic of Ireland, the repayment arrangements, and the current interest rate charges the United Kingdom is paying on the markets for loans. [HL790]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Sassoon): The interest rate on the UK bilateral loan to Ireland is as set out in the loan agreement the Financial Secretary to the Treasury deposited in the Library of the House in January 2011. The rate of interest currently applicable to each tranche of the loan is equal to the 7.5 year sterling swap rate, plus a margin of 2.29%.

The Financial Secretary to the Treasury announced on 11 June 2012 that the Treasury has agreed in principle to a new, lower interest rate on the UK bilateral loan. The new rate will represent the UK's cost of funds plus a small service fee of 0.18%. The UK's

28 Jun 2012 : Column WA104

cost of funding is defined as the average yield on gilt issuance in the six months prior to the disbursement of a tranche.

This is subject to the loan agreement being revised to reflect the new rate. Once the loan agreement has been revised, the new interest rate will apply retrospectively to those tranches of the loan already disbursed. The Financial Secretary has committed to update Parliament once the revised loan agreement has been signed and finalised.

The bilateral loan to Ireland is drawn in eight tranches, each with a 7.5 year term and with repayment of principal in full at the maturity date.

In the six months to 15 June 2012, the Debt Management Office issued conventional gilts with an average nominal yield of 2.000% and index-linked gilts with an average real yield of 0.022%.

Schools: Academies

Question

Asked by Lord Hoyle

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they endorse the establishment of academies in cases where there is no proven need for an additional school.[HL598]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Hill of Oareford): This Government endorse the establishment of free schools, (which are legally academies) wherever there is clear local parental demand for them. Evidence of parental demand is one of the key criteria upon which free school applications are assessed.

Schools: Free Schools

Questions

Asked by Lord Hoyle

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what are the health and safety obligations which need to be met by all free schools opening in September with regard to (1) science laboratories, (2) design and technology workshops, (3) canteens, (4) emergency access, and (5) disabled access.[HL593]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Hill of Oareford): As academies, free schools have to comply with the same health and safety regulations as all schools, including requirements relating to science laboratories, design and technology workshops, canteens, and emergency access/means of escape.

The Equalities Act 2010 requires all schools, including free schools, to prepare and implement an accessibility strategy to improve the physical environment of the school for pupils with disabilities and special educational needs (SEN).

Asked by Lord Hoyle

To ask Her Majesty’s Government which subjects must be taught at free schools.[HL595]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is the minimum number of hours for which any obligatory subject must be taught at free schools.[HL596]

28 Jun 2012 : Column WA105

Lord Hill of Oareford: As academies, free schools must offer a broad and balanced curriculum including English, maths and science. They must make provision for the teaching of religious education and for a daily act of collective worship. We do not prescribe the number of hours for any subject.

Schools: Meals

Question

Asked by Lord Beecham

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Hill of Oareford on 14 December 2011 (WA 276–7) concerning nutritional standards in academies and free schools, what response they have received from the School Food Trust; and whether, in the light of any such response and of representations recently made by Jamie Oliver and others, they will take steps to require academies and free schools to comply with the guidance applied to all other state schools.[HL315]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Hill of Oareford): The School Food Trust has now undertaken a qualitative study for the department of the provision of school food in a mixture of established and new academies, including one free school. The study examined the quality of provision in academies and the attitudes and intentions of the sector.

The report on the study, published on 15 May 2012, showed that all of the academies interviewed identified food as an important part of overall education provision. Some academies go over and above the minimum requirements and are offering their pupils high quality, nutritional food. As with the maintained sector, however, there is room for further improvement. The Secondary School Food Survey, published by the School Food Trust on 28 April, shows there are still too many schools that do not regularly provide a sufficiently balanced offering despite the standards.

The department wants all pupils to have the opportunity to select a healthy, balanced school lunch. We will therefore consider this new evidence—and that from the trust’s Secondary School Food Survey—to determine how best to achieve this policy aim.

Schools: Physical Education

Question

Asked by Lord Hoyle

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what are the requirements for the access of pupils aged 11–16 to school playing fields for physical education.[HL597]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Hill of Oareford): School playing fields at maintained schools are governed by the School Premises Regulations (England) 1999. Minimum areas of team game playing fields must be provided in schools with pupils over the age of eight. The grassed area of team game playing fields must be capable of

28 Jun 2012 : Column WA106

sustaining the playing of team games by pupils at the school for seven hours per week during term time. There is no specific national curriculum requirement for the access of pupils aged 11-16 to school playing fields for physical education.

Schools: Teachers

Questions

Asked by Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Hill of Oareford on 12 March (WA 30), how they calculated their provisional estimate for 2009–10; and when they expect official figures to be available.[HL587]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Hill of Oareford): The source of the information provided on 12 March in response to (WA 30) for 2009-10 was derived from the database of teacher records. This is an administrative data source that is collected primarily for pensions’ administration purposes. This department receives an extract of the database each year from the administrators of the Teachers’ Pensions Scheme for statistical analysis purposes. It is used to show the numbers of teachers who are in service at March of each year in publicly funded schools and other institutions and who are members of the Teachers’ Pensions Scheme. Each extract includes information for three years. The latest extract received includes information for March 2008, 2009 and 2010 and the information for March 2009 and 2010 is regarded as provisional because it is still liable to change as further teacher records are received. It is only the information for the oldest year (March 2008 on this extract) that is not regarded as provisional because after two years all the potential revisions/updates have been received. In consequence the most recent two years presented, 2008-09 and 2009-10, were marked as provisional. The statistics are published following the Official Statistics Code of Practice and are deemed to be National Statistics.

The figures provided for 2008-09 and 2009-10 are also marked as estimates because the data source is incomplete. The department’s statisticians investigate further the records of those teachers for whom it is unclear whether they are still in service to bring the total recorded in service on the database of teacher records in line with other trusted, published sources. This is to ensure that the analysis of teacher turnover for these years is not exaggerated or unreliable due to any incompleteness of the data.

The final version of the database of teacher records information for March 2010 is likely to become available in summer 2013 and the final version of turnover figures for 2009-10 will be available at that time.

The department is working towards replacing the turnover figures provided by the database of teacher records with information from the school workforce census. Work is currently being undertaken to link individual teachers’ records from the November 2010 census with the November 2011 census.

28 Jun 2012 : Column WA107

Teacher turnover rates are calculated by counting all teachers recorded in full or part-time service in the English publicly funded sector in March who were not in similar service or in the same establishment in March of the year before. Turnover therefore includes teacher wastage (ie those who had left service in the publicly funded schools sector in England), transfers to other establishments within the publicly funded schools sector and teachers leaving from full to part-time service or vice versa.

Asked by Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Hill of Oareford on

28 Jun 2012 : Column WA108

12 March (

WA 30

), what was the teacher retention rate by type of state school in England for the past five years.[HL588]

Lord Hill of Oareford: The following table shows the percentage of teachers who remained in service in the English publicly funded schools sector by type of school for each of the past five years for which figures are available.

Teacher retention has been defined as those teachers in full or part-time service in the English publicly funded schools sector at 31 March who remained in such service at 31 March of the year after. Teachers in supply service are excluded.

Retention1 rates of qualified teachers in publicly funded schools by sector.
Years: 2005-06 to 2009-10
Coverage: England
(Percentages)
2005-062006-072007-082008-0922009-102
Full-timePart-time3Full-timePart-time3Full-time1Part-time3Full-time1Part-time3Full-time1Part-time3

Sector

Maintained nursery

91.0

80.2

93.4

80.3

91.9

87.6

90.3

86.8

93.2

86.5

Maintained primary

92.0

83.4

92.5

83.3

92.5

84.9

92.5

85.5

93.3

84.6

Maintained secondary

91.8

80.6

92.4

78.6

92.5

82.0

92.8

83.3

93.3

82.7

Maintained special

92.0

83.2

92.2

81.5

92.6

85.9

92.9

83.6

93.1

82.9

Pupil referral units

89.0

84.3

89.1

76.9

90.6

83.9

91.8

84.0

90.0

83.8

Academies

90.6

..

91.8

..

92.1

..

92.3

83.8

92.5

82.3

All Sectors4°

91.9

82.2

92.5

81.2

92.5

83.7

92.6

84.5

93.3

83.7

Source:

Database of Teacher Records.

1. Retention is defined as all teachers in full or part-time service in the English publicly funded schools sector at 31 March who remained in such service at 31 March of the year after. It excludes those in supply service. Teachers who moved from full to part-time service or vice-versa or to other schools in the English publicly funded sector are excluded.

2. Provisional estimates.

3. 10-20% of part-time teachers may not be included in the data.

4. Figures prior to 2008-09 may vary from published figures because academies have been included.

.. Not available, there were insufficient cases and therefore the rate may not be reliable.

Sex Offences: Overseas

Question

Asked by Lord Hylton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many British citizens or residents have been (1) charged, and (2) convicted, of sexual offences against children in South and South-east Asia in the most recent four years, in either local or British courts.[HL862]

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Lord Howell of Guildford): The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) does not hold data on the number of people convicted or charged for these crimes. We can, however, provide data on the number of British nationals brought to our attention for having been arrested or detained for child sex offences overseas. The table below shows those cases which we were notified of in south and south-east Asia.

Financial YearNumber of Arrest/Detention—Child Sex Cases Opened

08-09

13

09-10

14

10-11

10

11-12

8

Total

45

The Home Office is conducting a review of how details of UK nationals convicted and imprisoned overseas are captured and recorded on the UK police national computer. The FCO is contributing to this exercise. The FCO is also working with the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) Criminal Records Office on a pilot scheme to improve information sharing on serious notifiable offences we are made aware of.

28 Jun 2012 : Column WA109

South Sudan

Question

Asked by Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, in the light of South Sudan’s Parliament having voted to suspend at least 75 Government officials for alleged theft of at least £2.6 billion, whether they are investigating whether any United Kingdom funding may have been misappropriated as part of this sum.[HL1059]

Baroness Northover: The UK does not directly channel any money through the Government in South Sudan. In South Sudan we route funds through non-governmental organisations, private sector firms and multilateral agencies that have robust financial management systems. We have not seen any evidence to suggest that UK funding may have been misappropriated by South Sudanese Government officials and therefore no investigations are currently planned. As donor lead on accountability and transparency, we are working to help South Sudan tackle corruption, for example through work to clean the payroll, strengthen financial management systems and support the anti-corruption institutions. Should any evidence come to light to suggest that government officials have misused UK funding, we would launch an investigation.

Taxation: Tax Returns

Question

Asked by Lord Higgins

To ask Her Majesty’s Government under what circumstances UK taxpayers are not allowed to submit their tax returns using HM Revenue and Customs' online service, but are required to submit a paper return.[HL827]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Sassoon): The vast majority of self assessment (SA) taxpayers can file their SA tax return online by using the free HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) self assessment online service or commercial software. However, a small proportion of SA taxpayers are not able to file online, usually because they need to complete special dedicated pages.

28 Jun 2012 : Column WA110

A full list of these exclusions is available on the HMRC website at: www.hmrc.gov.uk/ebu/2012-exc-indi.pdf but include:

taxpayers whose particular circumstances mean that they need to complete special tax return pages which are not available online; andtaxpayers whose records are dealt with under separate arrangements where their tax reference number will not be recognised by the authentication system.

These taxpayers are not able to file online as the number involved would make it disproportionately costly to develop the necessary forms and links to HMRC computer systems.

Teachers: Training

Question

Asked by Lord Storey

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Hill of Oareford on 16 March (WA 124), for each year between 2006 and 2011, how many trainees from (1) graduate teacher programmes, (2) higher education institutions, and (3) school-centred initial teacher training programmes, dropped out of their initial teacher training course.[HL767]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Hill of Oareford): The number of initial teacher training (ITT) trainees who leave their course at any point within their training is not collected centrally.

Complete data are collected for the number of trainees in England who leave their course during their final year. The number of initial teacher training (ITT) trainees who left (1) the graduate teacher programme (GTP), (2) higher education institutions (HEI) and (3) school-centred initial teacher training (SCITT) before the end of their course during their final year in England are presented in Table A. The number of trainees who attained qualified teacher status (QTS) and had other outcomes to the final year of their course in each year are also provided.

Figures for academic years 2005-06 to 2009-10 are provided and represent the latest available information. Figures for 2010-11 are not yet available.

Table A—Outcomes of final year ITT Trainees in England by Course Type, 2005-06 to 2009-10
2005-062006-072007-082008-092009-10

GTP

Left Before End of Course

350

310

240

280

350

Attained QTS

4,600

5,140

4,820

4,970

4,940

Other Outcomes

290

210

120

170

90

HEI

Left Before End of Course

1,160

1,120

1,100

990

920

Attained QTS

25,540

25,490

25,040

25,200

26,820

Other Outcomes

2,880

3,100

2,760

2,750

2,670

SCITT

Left Before End of Course

140

130

110

100

130

Attained QTS

1,470

1,490

1,430

1,450

1,600

Other Outcomes

30

20

30

30

20

28 Jun 2012 : Column WA111

28 Jun 2012 : Column WA112

Other ITT Routes

Left Before End of Course

70

40

40

60

60

Attained QTS

1,490

1,970

1,690

1,500

1,320

Other Outcomes

160

160

80

100

50

Total

Left Before End of Course

1,730

1,600

1,490

1,430

1,460

Attained QTS

33,100

34,090

32,980

33,110

34,680

Other Outcomes

3,360

3,500

2,980

3,050

2,830

Source:

Teaching Agency Performance Profiles

1 Numbers are individually rounded to the nearest 10 and may not sum to the indicated total.

2 Other ITT routes includes the teach first programme, overseas trained teachers and the registered teacher programme.

3 Other outcomes includes all other possible outcomes for a recruit on an ITT course, such as completing their course but not passing the literacy, numeracy and information communication technology skills tests.

4 HEI figures include Bradford College which is a further education college and not an HEI.

Visas

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, in considering visa applications by foreign nationals citing the European Convention on Human Rights Article 8 right to a family life, whether it is the right of the applicant or that of the applicant's family and associates in the United Kingdom that it is taken into account when deciding on their entitlement to enter or reside in the United Kingdom; and, in the case of family, whether different weightings are applied to differing types of relationship or blood ties.[HL886]

The Minister of State, Home Office (Lord Henley): A visa application citing Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights must meet the requirements of the Immigration Rules. The rules take account of the right to respect for family life of both the applicant and the family member they are applying to join in the UK. The rules do not apply different weightings to different types of family relationship. From 9 July 2012 the rules are expected to reflect the statement of changes laid on 13 June (Official Report, Commons, col. 194). The new rules will set clear requirements for each category of family applicant: partner, child, parent and adult dependent relative.