3 July 2012 : Column WA133

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Written Answers

Tuesday 3 July 2012

Apprenticeships

Question

Asked by Lord Janner of Braunstone

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what action they are taking to encourage more businesses to employ people aged 16–24 in apprenticeships.[HL1047]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Baroness Wilcox): To encourage businesses to take on apprentices, Government contribute towards the cost of their training; for 16-18 year-olds the Government fully fund the training costs.

The Apprenticeship Grant for Employers (introduced from 1 April) aims to increase the number of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) offering apprenticeship places to young people. Up to 40,000 incentives are available this financial year to SMEs taking on an apprentice aged 16-24 for the first time.

The National Apprenticeship Service, which promotes and supports apprenticeships, is prioritising the 16-24 age group in its work to engage new employers in the programme and when determining funding allocations to training providers.

Armed Forces: Commemoration

Question

Asked by Lord West of Spithead

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Earl Attlee on 7 February (WA 31), whether a decision has been taken on the bid for the Merchant Navy Medal to be granted a position in the Order of Wear in the Diamond Jubilee year.[HL1154]

Earl Attlee: Further to my Written Answer on 26 March (WA198), the matter remains subject to consideration by the Committee on the Grant of Honours, Decorations and Medals. No decision has yet been taken.

Artists’ Resale Right

Question

Asked by Lord Brooke of Sutton Mandeville

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many British artists have received Artist's Resale Right (ARR) payments since February 2006 on individual sales between £1,000 and £3,000, excluding those artists who also benefited from payments on sales above £3,000; and, for those artists who were not excluded, what was the average individual ARR transaction.[HL1153]

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The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Baroness Wilcox): Under the Artist's Resale Right Directive 2001 /84/EC, and the Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006, Government are not required to collect or retain any information on sales or royalties paid. Consequently the Government do not hold the data asked for in this question.

However, figures from the independent Szymanski report, commissioned by the previous Government, show that during the first year of resale right in the UK, 436 living British artists received payments for sales in the €1,000 to €3,000 span, but of those only 167 (around a third) had sold items falling into other cost spans. Figures the Government have received from the Design and Artists Copyright Society (DACS) show that over a number of years post 2006, sales between €1,000 and €3,000 amounted to around £75,000 of resale payments per annum, and made up nearly a third of all currently qualifying sales.

Aviation: Passenger Duty

Question

Asked by Lord Monks

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what procedures they have in place to audit air passenger duty payments made to them by airlines.[HL931]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Sassoon): Airline operators registered for air passenger duty (APD) are audited on a rolling basis, in line with many of the other taxes managed by HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC).

A number of factors are taken into account when determining the frequency of the audits. These include the complexity and size of the business, its past and current compliance history and general passenger number data, which airports are required to provide on request.

HMRC's management of APD is open to audit by the National Audit Office.

Bank of England

Questions

Asked by Lord Myners

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they will publish the collateral required under the Bank of England's extended collateral term repo facility; and how this facility differs from the bank's terminated special liquidity scheme.[HL966]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Sassoon): The extended collateral term repo facility is a Bank of England facility. As stated on the Bank of England website, the Bank would normally expect collateral used in the Extended Collateral Term Repo operations to have been pre-positioned for potential use in the discount window facility. Details of collateral accepted in the discount window facility are provided on the Bank of England website. Details of the bank's special liquidity scheme (SLS), including information on the collateral that was eligible for use in the SLS, are also outlined on the Bank of England website.

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Asked by Lord Myners

To ask Her Majesty’s Government why the maturities proposed under the Bank of England's Extended collateral term repo facility are materially shorter than offered under the European Central Bank's long-term refinancing operation.[HL967]

Lord Sassoon: The extended collateral term repo facility is a Bank of England facility. This facility will provide sterling liquidity for a period of six-months, through monthly auctions.

The Governor has also announced a new funding for lending scheme, which will provide funding to banks for an extended period of several years.

Asked by Lord Myners

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Sassoon on 13 June (WA 251), whether HM Treasury will now commission an independent review into the role and actions of the court and the governance of the Bank of England.[HL968]

Lord Sassoon: The Government are pleased that court has announced the commission of three independent reviews into areas of the bank's performance and current capabilities and look forward to seeing the outcome of this work.

Benefits

Question

Asked by Baroness Drake

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, in the light of their plans to end child benefit as a universal benefit, what steps they are taking to ensure that women who would otherwise have an underlying entitlement to child benefit will still be credited with the national insurance record needed to accrue entitlement to a state pension.[HL933]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Sassoon): National insurance credits, which protect a person's future entitlement to basic state pension and the state second pension, will remain available for those claiming child benefit for a child less than 12 years old.

Parents and carers who get national insurance credits linked to claiming child benefit will not lose them on the basis of their household income, even if they choose not to receive the actual payments or their partner has to pay the new tax charge.

The introduction of the tax charge will not affect a person's right to claim child benefit. Parents and carers will have two options to safeguard their state pension, which will be made clear on the child benefit form:

they can claim child benefit, receive the payments and, if liable, they or their partner can pay the new tax charge; or

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they can register for child benefit to establish entitlement to the credits but choose not to receive the actual payments; this means that neither they nor their partner will be liable to pay the new tax charge.

Births: Under 18s

Questions

Asked by Baroness Tonge

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what was the number of (1) pregnancies, and (2) deliveries to married girls below 16 years old in England in (a) 2007, (b) 2008, (c) 2009, (d) 2010, (e) 2011, and (f) to 1 June 2012.[HL1020]

Asked by Baroness Tonge

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what was the number of (1) pregnancies, and (2) deliveries to married girls below 18 years old in England in (a) 2007, (b) 2008, (c) 2009, (d) 2010, (e) 2011, and (f) to 1 June 2012.[HL1021]

Lord Wallace of Saltaire: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, Director General for ONS, to Baroness Tonge, dated June 2012.

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics (ONS), I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking what was the number of (1) pregnancies, and (2) deliveries to married girls below 16 years old in England in (a) 2007, (b) 2008, (c) 2009, (d) 2010, (e) 2011, and (f) to 1 June 2012. And also, what was the number of (1) pregnancies, and (2) deliveries to married girls below 18 years old in England in (a) 2007, (b) 2008, (c) 2009, (d) 2010, (e) 2011, and (f) to 1 June 2012.

This question has been answered using conceptions data to represent pregnancies and maternities data to represent deliveries. Conception statistics are estimated for women usually resident in England and are based on birth registrations and abortion records. Maternity statistics are based on birth registrations. Information on marital status is provided by the informant at the time of the birth or abortion. Marital status may have changed between conception and birth or abortion.

The table in the attached spreadsheet shows the number of conceptions and maternities to married women under the age of 18 as well as under the age of 16 between the years 2007 to 2010, the latest years for which figures are available.

Number of conceptions and maternities in England to married women under the age of 16 and 18, 2007-10
 Age2010 22009 220082007

Maternities

Under 161

7

3

5

15

 

Under 18

175

211

205

264

Conceptions

Under 161

12

21

9

14

 

Under 18

233

327

369

405

1

The minimum legal age for marriage is 16 years of age in England and Wales. However, it is possible to marry at younger ages in other countries.

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2

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008 contained provisions enabling two females in a same-sex couple to register a birth from 1 September 2009 onwards. Due to the small numbers in England in 2009 and 2010, births registered to a same-sex couple in a civil partnership are combined with births within marriage. Similarly conceptions within a civil partnership are included with conceptions within marriage.

Source:

Office for National Statistics.

Copyright and reproduction

© Crown copyright 2012

You may re-use this information (not including logos) free of charge in any format or medium, under the terms of the Open Government Licence.

To view this licence, go to: http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/

or write to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives, Kew, London TW9 4DU email: psi@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk.

Care Homes

Question

Asked by Lord Hunt of Kings Heath

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what action they will take in response to the increase in the number of whistle-blowers coming forward to the Care Quality Commission with concerns regarding standards in care homes.[HL1063]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is the independent regulator of health and adult social care providers in England. Under the Health and Social Care Act 2008, all providers of regulated health and adult social care activities must be registered with the CQC and meet the essential levels of safety and quality. In addition to inspections, the CQC uses a wide range of information in its assessment of providers including any concerns raised by staff. The CQC can take independent enforcement action where it finds a provider is not meeting the requirements.

The CQC is responsible for assessing the information it receives. The CQC has a centralised system for managing all whistleblowing concerns raised with it which makes sure that they are properly considered by its local inspectors.

Care Quality Commission

Question

Asked by Lord Hunt of Kings Heath

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their assessment of the likelihood that the Care Quality Commission will be able to register all general practitioner practices by April 2013.[HL1167]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): Providers of National Health Service primary medical services will be required to be registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) from 1 April 2013. The CQC has made good progress in putting in place the mechanisms for registering

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these providers, who will be able to open their online applications in July. We are informed by the Commission that it is on course to carry out the registration of these providers by April 2013.

Channel Tunnel

Questions

Asked by Lord Bradshaw

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Earl Attlee on 27 June (WA 65), what steps they are taking to increase transparency of the composite elements of the access charges to all users of the Channel Tunnel.[HL1208]

Earl Attlee: The Joint Economic Committee of the Channel Tunnel Intergovernmental Commission (IGC) is currently investigating the charging regime in the tunnel to establish its level of consistency with European legislation including those aspects which govern its transparency.

The report of the first stage of the committee's work was published in October 2011. A further report is due to be published this autumn.

Asked by Lord Bradshaw

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Earl Attlee on 27 June (WA 65), what assessment they have made of whether the proposed takeover by Eurotunnel of the French ferry company SeaFrance raises any potential competition issues.[HL1209]

Earl Attlee: It is a matter for the competition authorities (either the European Commission (DG Competition) or the Office of Fair Trading) to determine whether a takeover raises competition issues, not the Department for Transport.

Children: Access

Questions

Asked by Lord Roberts of Llandudno

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the compliance with court orders arising from cases involving the contact between children and their parents following the parents' separation.[HL955]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what they consider to be a reasonable length of time for the resolution of court cases concerning a parent denied contact with their child.[HL956]

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord McNally): Applications for contact are private law proceedings under section 8 of the Children Act 1989. Section 1(2) of that Act makes it clear that the court shall have regard to the general principle that any delay in determining the arrangements for a child is likely to prejudice the welfare of that child. The Government have committed to take forward recommendations from the Family Justice Review designed to tackle unnecessary delays in the courts.

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Every contact case is different and there is no single pathway for a case to follow. However, revised guidance issued by the President of the Family Division in April 2010 requires that the first hearing should, where practicable, take place within four weeks of the application being issued, and in any event within six weeks.

Prior to the first hearing CAFCASS will undertake safety checks and report the outcome of these to the court. The court will then consider any safety issues and decide how to deal with these. If appropriate and safe the court may decide to make an order for contact at the first hearing.

Where a case cannot be settled at the first hearing the court will decide how the case should progress. That could include: holding a finding-of-fact hearing to establish any allegation of domestic violence made; adjourning the proceedings to enable the parties to attempt mediation; ordering a welfare report to be prepared by CAFCASS; or directing one or both parties to attend a contact activity designed to promote contact with the child concerned (for example, attendance at a meeting to find out about and consider mediation or participation in a parenting information programme or domestic violence perpetrator programme). In addition, the courts can, and frequently do, make short-duration orders to establish or re-establish contact and to enable the parties to test out arrangements for the child with a view to the court making a substantive order to settle the case.

In relation to compliance with contact orders, the family courts have an inherent power to treat breach as a contempt of court, with the sanction of a fine or imprisonment, although this is rarely used in family proceedings. In December 2008 the courts were given wider powers to enforce contact orders through an enforcement order for unpaid work or an order for the payment of financial compensation where a financial loss has been incurred due to a breach. Data from Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service show that in the year April 2011 to March 2012 there were 463 applications for an enforcement order and 260 applications for a financial compensation order.

The Government recognise that non-compliance with contact orders remains an issue which undermines confidence in the family justice system. On 13 June the Government launched a consultation which includes proposals to extend further the range of enforcement powers available to the courts. That consultation closes on 5 September 2012.

Climate Change

Questions

Asked by Lord Donoughue

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what funding they provide for the establishment and maintenance of non-governmental organisations in the United Kingdom that deal specifically with matters relating to climate change.[HL1042]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Energy and Climate Change (Lord Marland): The Department of Energy and Climate Change has not provided funding for the establishment and maintenance

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of non-governmental organisations in the United Kingdom that deal specifically with matters relating to climate change in the last financial year.

Asked by Lord Donoughue

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what amount and what proportion of the British Council's public funding is allocated to initiatives specifically aimed at addressing climate change, such as the International Climate Champions and Challenge Europe programmes.[HL1043]

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Lord Howell of Guildford): The British Council's total grant spend on climate change programmes in 2010-11 was £5.4 million and in 2011-12 was £2.2 million. As a proportion of the British Council's total grant in aid this represents 2.8% in 2010-11 and 1.2% in 2011-12. In addition to its grant spend, the British Council secured £0.5 million and £1.0 million in partnership income for climate work in 2010-11 and 2011-12 respectively.

Asked by Lord Donoughue

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what funding has been allocated to the International Climate Fund; and how this funding has been spent to help developing countries tackle climate change.[HL1044]

Baroness Northover: I refer the noble Lord to the reply I gave to his question on 26 June 2012 (Official Report, col. WA 45).

Further information is contained in the publication “UK International Climate Fund: Tackling Climate Change, Reducing Poverty”, a copy of which is available on the DfID website at http://www.dfid.gov.uk/What-we-do/Key-Issues/Climate-and-environment/International-negotiations/.

Companies: Directors' Pay

Questions

Asked by Lord Myners

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the answer by Baroness Wilcox on 20 June (Official Report, col. 1778), what consultation arrangements are in place for employees of UK companies to provide advice on directors' pay.[HL1089]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Baroness Wilcox): We encourage employees to make use of the tools that they have to express their views on directors' pay. Under regulations implementing the information and consultation directive, all employees of organisations with 50 or more staff have the right to request an information and consultation (MX) agreement. The request must be supported by 10% of employees. The employer is then obliged to negotiate with staff to agree on the topics they will be consulted on and how.

The Government are currently consulting on revised remuneration reporting regulations, determining what

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companies should be required to say in directors' remuneration reports about whether employee views have been sought.

Asked by Lord Stoddart of Swindon

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they consider the proposal that workers should be consulted over directors' pay to be a step towards syndicalism, and whether they will consider introducing legislation for workers' representation on management boards to be elected by, and from, the employees of the enterprise.[HL1100]

Baroness Wilcox: The current consultation on revised remuneration reporting regulations includes a question on whether the forward-looking policy section of the remuneration report should include a statement on whether and, if so, how a company sought employee views on the remuneration policy. The Government look forward to analysing all the responses after the consultation closes on 26 September 2012.

Asked by Baroness Noakes

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether the proposals in relation to directors’ pay announced by the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills on 20 June will apply to all listed companies or only to those in the FTSE-100 index, as suggested by Baroness Wilcox on 20 June (Official Report, col. 1779).[HL1108]

Baroness Wilcox: The reforms will apply to all UK incorporated, listed companies, of which there are around 1,000.

Creative Industries: Loans

Questions

Asked by Lord Cotter

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what proportion of small and medium-sized enterprises in the creative industries they envisage will access finance under the economic stimulus package announced on 15 June. [HL936]

Baroness Garden of Frognal: Government have no current plans to develop a loan guarantee scheme specifically for small and medium-sized enterprises in the creative industries sector in the United Kingdom. Businesses in this sector can already benefit from a range of existing finance schemes. These include the Enterprise Finance Guarantee, Enterprise Capital Funds, the Business Angel Co-Investment Fund, the National Loan Guarantee Scheme and the Business Finance Partnership.

Asked by Lord Cotter

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what proportion of small and medium-sized enterprises in the creative industries they envisage will access finance under the economic stimulus package announced on 15 June.[HL936]

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Baroness Garden of Frognal: The Government are giving this proposal careful consideration, in the context of the proposals for other European Union financial instruments and the negotiations on the multiannual financial framework for 2014-20. The Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) has received a number of representations from creative industries, particularly in response to its consultation on the Creative Europe proposal earlier this year. The consultation report and responses are available on the DCMS website at: http://www.culture.gov.uk/consultations/9132.aspx.

Asked by Lord Cotter

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what projections they have made of the additional investment that the provision in the European Union’s Creative Europe proposal for a loan guarantee scheme would leverage for the creative industries; and what proportion of this they expect would be leveraged for use in the United Kingdom.[HL938]

Baroness Garden of Frognal: The European Commission forecast in its impact assessment that the Creative Europe loan guarantee scheme could leverage between €964.44 million (£771.46 million) and €2.8 billion (£2.24 billion) in additional investment for the creative industries across the European Union over the seven year period 2014-20, if the current budget proposal is maintained. However, we are seeking reductions to the budget proposal in line with our overall priority of limiting the EU budget to a real-terms freeze. We have not made a separate projection of the total amount of additional investment which is likely to be leveraged either for the European Union as a whole or for the United Kingdom in particular.

Driving: Breathalyser Tests

Question

Asked by Lord Bradshaw

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the potential impact on road deaths and injuries of introducing a system, such as that in France, requiring drivers to keep a disposable breathalyser in their vehicles.[HL926]

Earl Attlee: The Government have not assessed the potential impact of requiring the carrying of the disposable breathalysers system by drivers in the UK, because they have no plans to introduce a system similar to that in France. They will, however, be interested to learn about the experience in France.

Requiring the use of disposable breathalysers in the UK would place a burden on the many drivers who do not drink and drive, and on the police in enforcing the requirement. It could also risk more drivers trying to drive when close to the legal limit.

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Economy: Debt

Question

Asked by Lord Stevens of Ludgate

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they have considered cancelling the Government debt held by the Bank of England; and if so, what is their assessment of what the consequences would be.[HL923]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Sassoon): The independent Monetary Policy Committee of the Bank of England (MPC) has operational responsibility for monetary policy. The MPC makes decisions on its policy tools, including quantitative easing (QE), in order to meet the 2% inflation target in the medium term. Under QE, the Bank of England purchases assets such as gilts from the private sector, financing this by the creation of central bank reserves.

The separation of fiscal and monetary policy is a key feature of the UK's economic policy framework. To use monetary policy tools to meet fiscal objectives, such as financing government borrowing, could conflict with the MPC's objective of price stability and undermine confidence in the UK's monetary policy framework. Additionally, Government borrowing from the central bank is illegal under Article 123 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union.

Energy: Renewables Obligation Certificates

Question

Asked by Lord Myners

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they are reviewing the valuation basis and value of renewables obligation certificates; and whether the terms of certificates issued can be retrospectively amended.[HL1088]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Energy and Climate Change (Lord Marland): The value of renewable obligation certificates (ROCs) to an electricity supplier is assumed to average at the buyout price (which a supplier can pay to discharge its obligation) plus 10%. The buyout price is calculated by Ofgem in accordance with article 43 of the Renewables Obligation Order 2009. The Government have no plans to review these provisions. The actual value of a ROC to a generator will depend on supply and demand for the ROCs during the obligation period in question, and the individual arrangements reached between generators and the supplier or other person to whom they sell the ROC.

Once a ROC has been issued it can be revoked by Ofgem in certain circumstances. The powers for the renewables obligation include powers to make an order varying the number of ROCs that can be carried over to the following obligation period and powers to vary the level of support, including for existing generating stations. However, for most technologies we have a grandfathering policy of not changing the level of support for accredited generating capacity.

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EU: China

Questions

Asked by Lord Empey

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what contacts they have had with other European governments on resolving the outstanding restrictive trade and investment practices imposed by the Government of China upon exporters and investors from the United Kingdom and the European Union. [HL1067]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Baroness Wilcox): Trade-related issues are discussed in Europe both bilaterally and in formal EU committees, for example at the Trade Foreign Affairs Council on which I represent the Government, and at the Trade Policy Committee (Full Members) where a senior BIS official represents the Government. The Government engages fully in these fora.

During these discussions, China regularly features in relation to specific cases of restrictive practices and in relation to the EU's overall trade strategy with China. Most recently, for example, I participated in discussions on China at the Trade Foreign Affairs Council on 31 May.

HMG officials in Beijing and Brussels are also in regular bilateral contact with their EU counterparts on these matters. For example directors from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and Department for Business, Innovation, and Skills met with German officials on 9 May 2012 to discuss EU-China trade issues.

Asked by Lord Empey

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what recent representations they have made to the Government of China regarding the implementation of protectionist trade policies by that country.[HL1068]

Baroness Wilcox: Ministers and officials regularly discuss trade and investment issues on a bilateral basis with the Chinese Government. I myself have met with Chinese officials on a number of occasions, including my visit to China from 26 May to 1 June 2012, and raised protectionist policies. Other recent examples include meetings between the Prime Minister and senior Communist Party official Li Changchun on 17 April 2012; the UK-China Joint Economic and Trade Commission on 15 December 2011 which I attended alongside the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills; and the Chancellor's talks with the Chinese Vice-Premier at the UK-China economic and financial dialogue in September 2011.

HMG officials regularly discuss trade and investment issues with Chinese counterparts. For example, in June 2012, officials from BIS and the Cabinet Office discussed Chinese procurement policies with Chinese government officials. There is also routine dialogue between officials at the UK embassy in Beijing and officials from the relevant Chinese ministries.

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EU: Creative Europe Programme

Question

Asked by Lord Cotter

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what discussions they have held with other European Union member states concerning the financial settlement for the proposed Creative Europe programme, and in particular plans to increase the suggested budget. [HL934]

Baroness Garden of Frognal: The Government have had a number of discussions with other member states on the proposed Creative Europe programme. However, we have been very clear that we cannot consider specific proposals for individual programme budgets until the negotiations on the overall multiannual financial framework for 2014-20 have been completed. We have also made it clear that we will be seeking reductions to the Commission's proposal for this programme, in line with our overall priority of limiting the EU budget to a real terms freeze.

EU: Financial Assistance to Member States

Question

Asked by Lord Myners

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they will press for European support for Spanish banks to be provided through the European Financial Stability Facility rather than through the European Stability Mechanism.[HL988]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Sassoon): On Monday 25 June 2012, Spain officially requested financial assistance from the euro area to recapitalise its banks. The decision on whether financial assistance will be funded by the European Stability Mechanism or from the European Financial Stability Facility is a matter for the euro area member states.

Finance: Regulation

Question

Asked by Lord Myners

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what discussions they plan to have with the Government of the United States about the view expressed by Mr Gary Gensler, the chairman of the US Commodity Futures Trading Commission, that lax regulation of financial services in the United Kingdom was leading to a “London loophole”, endangering world financial stability.[HL970]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Sassoon): The Government regularly conduct meetings with a range of officials involved in domestic and international financial services industries, during which matters of mutual interest are discussed.

3 July 2012 : Column WA146

The Government are committed to reforming and strengthening regulation of financial services in the UK and internationally, including: through the Financial Services Bill currently before the House of Lords; through work to implement the recommendations of the Independent Commission on Banking; and through implementation of the G20 commitments on financial regulation, including the implementation of Basel 3 in Europe.

Forced Marriage

Questions

Asked by Baroness Tonge

To ask Her Majesty’s Government when they intend to introduce legislation to criminalise forced marriage.[HL1130]

The Minister of State, Home Office (Lord Henley): On 8 June we announced our plans to criminalise forced marriage. Subject to parliamentary time, we hope to introduce the legislation in the 2013-14 session.

Asked by Baroness Tonge

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they intend that any forthcoming criminalisation of forced marriage would have extra-territorial effect .[HL1132]

Lord Henley: The Government have recently signed the Council of Europe convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence on behalf of the United Kingdom. Officials are currently preparing plans to ratify the convention, including the options as regards the appropriate extraterritorial application of new criminal law relating to forced marriage. An announcement will be made in due course.

Asked by Baroness Tonge

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they intend that any forthcoming criminalisation of forced marriage will include terms on (1) deportation, (2) the withdrawal of United Kingdom citizenship, or (3) the application of financial penalties for perpetrators.[HL1133]

Lord Henley: We have not yet drafted the new offence and so are not yet in a position to say how it will work. An announcement will be made in due course.

Government Departments: Apprentices

Questions

Asked by Lord Adonis

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what was the total number of staff employed within the private offices of ministers and the permanent secretary at the Cabinet Office on 1 June; and how many of them were (1) under the age of 21, (2) apprentices under the age of 21, and (3) apprentices over the age of 21.[HL907]

3 July 2012 : Column WA147

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many apprentices (1) under the age of 21, and (2) over the age of 21, were employed within the Cabinet Office on 1 June, excluding agencies and non-departmental public bodies.[HL908]

Lord Wallace of Saltaire: As at 1 June 2012, the Cabinet Office employed 14 apprentices of which 10 apprentices were under the age of 21.

The total number of civil servants employed within the four ministerial private offices and the Permanent Secretary's Office at the Cabinet Office is 23. None of these staff are under the age of 21 and there is one apprentice over the age of 21.

Asked by Lord Willis of Knaresborough

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many apprentices were taken on by each government department in (1) 2009–10, (2) 2010–11 and (3) 2011–12, and how many are still in post.[HL947]

Lord Wallace of Saltaire: It is for individual departments to decide whether to engage apprentices.

The overall numbers of apprentices placed into departments in each of the years was 2009-10: 2992, 2010-11: 2148 and 2011-12: 1812

The decrease in numbers reflects the downsizing in the number of civil servants across government since May 2010. Civil Service Learning will be consulting departments in July on how we can potentially facilitate a cross-government approach.

Data are not held centrally regarding the numbers still in post.

Asked by Lord Adonis

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what was the total number of staff employed within the private offices of ministers and the Permanent Secretary at the Ministry of Defence on 1 June; and how many of them were (1) under the age of 21, (2) apprentices under the age of 21, and (3) apprentices over the age of 21.[HL961]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence (Lord Astor of Hever): As at 1 June 2012 there were a total number of 32 staff employed within the private offices of ministers and the Permanent Secretary at the Ministry of Defence. None of the incumbents are aged under 21 and none of them are apprentices.

The provision of opportunities to gain nationally recognised civilian qualifications through the accreditation of education, training and experience is an important part of the way we train and develop both civilian and military personnel.

The Ministry of Defence as a whole achieves some 13,000 apprenticeship completions each year (level 2 and level 3).

MoD values its apprentices and currently runs two in house civilian apprenticeship engineering schemes; Technician and Craft, managed respectively by Defence

3 July 2012 : Column WA148

Equipment and Support (DE&S) and Defence Support Group (DSG). Workplace apprenticeships leading to NVQ certification are also delivered through an external training provider. The best civilian apprentices from establishments across the UK are recognised at an annual awards ceremony hosted by the Chief of Defence Materiel.

The MoD also participates in the fast stream programme and runs its own internal development programme (called means identifying developing internal talent). Both are accelerated development programmes. Fast stream is a cross Civil Service programme designed to attract graduates and MIDIT is an internal development programme which identifies and fosters internal talent. Members of both schemes are guaranteed a series of job placements designed to prepare them for senior managerial positions within the organisation. Members of both programmes regularly and routinely work in private office roles, including for Ministers and the Permanent Secretary.

Asked by Lord Adonis

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many apprentices (1) under the age of 21, and (2) over the age of 21, were employed within the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills on 1 June, excluding agencies and non-departmental public bodies. [HL1109]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Baroness Wilcox): On 1 June 2012 the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills employed a total of 19 apprentices, only one of whom is under the age of 21.

Government Departments: Legal Payments

Questions

Asked by Lord Laird

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what payments were made by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport to (1) Clifford Chance, (2) Freshfields, (3) Slaughter and May, (4) Allen and Overy, and (5) Linklaters, in (a) 2008–09, (b) 2009–10, (c) 2010–11, and (d) 2011–12; and to what those payments related.[HL918]

Baroness Garden of Frognal: Only one of these firms, Linklaters, was used by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport during the requested period. The amounts paid per year are shown in the table below. The fees were paid for professional advice in connection with an asset sale.

Financial YearAmount Paid (£)

2008-09

Nil

2009-10

143,267

2010-11

756,812

2011-12

893,858

Total

1,793,937

3 July 2012 : Column WA149

Asked by Lord Laird

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what payments were made by HM Revenue and Customs to (1) Clifford Chance, (2) Freshfields, (3) Slaughter and May, (4) Allen and Overy, and (5) Linklaters, in (a) 2008–09, (b) 2009–10, (c) 2010–11, and (d) 2011–12; and to what those payments related.[HL919]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Sassoon): During the periods requested HMRC has made payments to Slaughter and May as detailed below. Our systems do not show payments to any of the other businesses listed.

Service ProviderSpend per financial year (£)
2008-092009-102010-112011-12

Slaughter and May

0.00

2053.11

1722.00

0.00

The payments were for legal services relating to the copying of court documents.

Government: Ministerial Visits

Question

Asked by Lord Stoddart of Swindon

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether the official attendance by Ministers at national and international events is financed by public funds and, if so, what is the likely saving arising from their boycott of the Euro 2012 football championships in the Ukraine.[HL1103]

Lord Wallace of Saltaire: The Ministerial Code provides guidance to Ministers on the funding of travel arrangements.

Information is not held on the likely savings arising from Ministers' non-attendance at the Euro 2012 football championships in the Ukraine.

Greece: Currency

Question

Asked by Lord Jones of Cheltenham

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their advice to those planning to visit Greece regarding currency arrangements.[HL944]

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Lord Howell of Guildford): The Government advise all British nationals planning visits overseas to check the Foreign Office travel advice pages on the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) website. Under the general “staying safe and healthy” section there is advice on travel money. Before travelling anywhere in the world, the FCO advises travellers to take enough money to cover emergencies and unexpected delays and to consider taking more than one means of payment (cash, debit card, credit card). There is no specific advice for Greece.

3 July 2012 : Column WA150

Health: Haemolytic Uremic Syndrome

Question

Asked by Lord Black of Brentwood

To ask Her Majesty’s Government when they intend to respond to the National Advisory Group for Specialised Services' recommendation on atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome.[HL1203]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The Advisory Group for National Specialised Services met recently to consider whether there should be a nationally commissioned service for the treatment of atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome. Ministers have yet to receive its recommendation.

Health: Pre-natal Diagnostic Tests

Questions

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Earl Howe on 11 June (WA 170–2), how many women whose pregnancies registered as high risk following a biochemical serum screening went on to have one of the available diagnostic tests in each year for which records are available.[HL1082]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many pre-natal diagnostic tests for disability were carried out in each year for which records are available, and how many of those tests returned negative results, according to whether they were an alpha-feto protein test, a chorionic vilius sampling test, an amniocentesis or a cordocentesis.[HL1083]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The department does not collect these figures centrally. The Association of Clinical Cytogenetics collects data on the number of invasive procedures undertaken following a positive Down’s syndrome screening result on behalf of the NHS Fetal Anomaly Screening Programme. Figures for the number of women receiving a screen positive result and the number of diagnostic procedures undertaken are provided in the following table.

Test results for those women referred for prenatal diagnosis is not collected.

Screen PositiveAmniocentesisChorionic villus samplingTotal

2003-04

28,700

8,286

36,968

2004-05

24,349

7,980

32,329

2005-06

22,625

7,819

30,444

2006-07

14,733

4,781

19,514

2007-08

19,019

12,932

4,681

17,613

2008-09

20,318

8,317

3,129

11,446

2009-10

15,910

6,795

3,669

10,464

2010-11

17,125

6,353

4,195

10,548

3 July 2012 : Column WA151

Health: Professional Standards

Question

Asked by Lord Willis of Knaresborough

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many health care assistants have been banned from working with patients for failing their duty of care towards patients or clients in each of the past 10 years. [HL1143]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The department does not hold information on the number of healthcare assistants that have been banned from working for failing in their duty of care.

The role of the Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA) is to establish if an individual poses a continued risk of harm to vulnerable groups. If this risk is established then the ISA can bar an individual from working in certain roles in health and social care including health care assistant roles.

The ISA is reliant on the job title provided by organisations and this can differ widely between employers and across the sectors. Therefore being precise about the number of health care assistants who have been barred is not possible.

In 2011 there were 115 cases referred to the ISA where the individual’s job role was described as healthcare assistant. All of these were considered for barring, with five individuals subsequently being barred.

However, in the same period the ISA concluded over 1,800 cases where the individual was described as being “in a care or support role within a health or social care setting”, 245 of these cases resulted in the individual being barred.

Higher Education: Business Modules

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they will require universities to include in all courses a module on understanding businesses.[HL1073]

Baroness Verma: Universities are autonomous organisations, entirely responsible for deciding the content of their own courses.

Professor Sir Tim Wilson's independent Review of Business-University collaboration makes some recommendations aimed at improving the employability and enterprise skills of students. The Government published their response to the review on 26 June 2012.

We welcome the good work that universities already undertake, but want to see even greater employer-university collaboration—for example, in providing work experience, co-designing and kite-marking courses. That is why we are funding Council for Industry and Higher Education to establish a National Centre for Universities and Business, which will gather evidence, bring together university and business leaders, and support engagement

3 July 2012 : Column WA152

between stakeholders. This will include work to support good practice in developing students' employability and enterprise skills.

Homelessness: Rough Sleepers

Questions

Asked by Lord Roberts of Llandudno

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many rough sleepers there were in each region of the United Kingdom at the most recent count.[HL1036]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many rough sleepers were aged 25, or younger, at the most recent count.[HL1037]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Communities and Local Government (Baroness Hanham): Data on the number of rough sleepers aged 25 or younger are not collected centrally by the department. However, the London Combined Homelessness and Information Network (CHAIN) annual report for 2010-11 highlights that the proportion of young people seen rough sleeping remained low—8% were under 25. Only four people under 18 were contacted.

The regional rough sleeping figures for England can be found on the department's website at http://www.communities.gov.uk/documents/statistics/xls/20936651.xls.

International Passenger Survey

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what was the cost of the Office for National Statistics' International Passenger Survey in each of the past five years; what was the rate of refusal to answer; how those individuals questioned when landing in the United Kingdom were chosen; whether bus passengers were questioned; how long the interviews took; and in what languages interviews were conducted.[HL1123]

Lord Wallace of Saltaire: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, Director General for ONS, to Lord Laird, dated June 2012.

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics (ONS), I have been asked to respond to your Parliamentary Question to Her Majesty's Government. asking what was the cost of the Office for National Statistics' International Passenger Survey in each of the last five years: what was the rate of refusal to answer; how those individuals questioned when landing in the United Kingdom were chosen; whether bus passengers were questioned; how long the interviews took; and in what languages interviews were conducted. [HL1123]

I am able to report the following details.

1. The cost of the International Passenger Survey in each of the last five years has been:

3 July 2012 : Column WA153

Financial yearCost (£)

2007-08

3,169,706

2008-09

5,137,036

2009-10

6,099,479

2010-11

6,046,282

2011-12

5,403,395

Up to 2007-08. the survey's indirect costs were not recorded against the survey. From 2008-09. both direct and indirect costs are recorded. Indirect costs are therefore not reflected in the 2007-08 figure.

2. The rate of refusal to answer in each year was as follows:

Calendar year% Refusals

2007

1.7

2008

1.9

2009

2.2

2010

1.9

2011

1.7

3. At airports IPS interviewers conduct their work airside in a location where all arriving international passengers can be counted. The interviewers count individuals arriving in the United Kingdom as they cross a predetermined line and select every nth passenger crossing that line for interview. The sampling interval, n. is predetermined. A similar approach is adopted for passengers arriving by Eurostar. On sea and tunnel routes passengers are counted in car lanes. foot arrival halls, or onboard and are then selected to a pre-determined sampling interval.

4. Bus passengers were questioned. Anyone entering the UK by bus will travel via sea or tunnel routes, both of which are sampled.

5. The average length of an IPS interview is approximately four minutes. For foreign residents arriving in the UK the average length is approximately two minutes.

6. The IPS is conducted in English. However, self completion questionnaires are made available in Italian, Japanese, Spanish, German, French, Cantonese, Mandarin, Russian, Portuguese, Greek, Polish, Bulgarian and Romanian in case any selected passenger is unable to answer in English.

London Festival 2012

Question

Asked by Lord Beecham

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how much National Lottery or Government funding is expected to be spent (1) in total, and (2) on a per capita basis, in support of events forming part of the London Festival 2012 in each of the eight events categories described in the official guide.[HL1011]

Baroness Garden of Frognal: As the finale to the four-year Cultural Olympiad, the London 2012 Festival is organised and delivered by the London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games

3 July 2012 : Column WA154

(LOCOG), in partnership with a range of funders and delivery organisations. The total funding contributed by the National Lottery and Government is £33.76 million (although other sources of public funding are included as co-funding, but not recorded centrally).

As the festival has just opened, per capita costs cannot be calculated as the events have not taken place. Analysis has not been made to map these costs across each sub-heading within the London 2012 Festival Guide.

From the information it holds, LOCOG estimates that the investment in London 2012 Festival events from the public and private sectors amounts to £55.37 million as follows:

Olympic Lottery Distributor: £13.97 million;Co-funding: £12.73 million

*

;Arts Council England: £12.10 million;LOCOG: £5.01 million

**

;Legacy Trust: £3.87 million;Greater London Authority: £3.87 million; andDepartment for Culture, Media and Sport: £3.82 million.

*

Co-funding includes a variety of funding sources—ticket income, corporate sponsorship, BBC, Channel 4, Creative Scotland, Arts Councils of Wales and Northern Ireland, VisitBritain, various smaller sponsors, co-commissioning income from partner arts organisations, trusts and foundations.

**

LOCOG is a private company independent of Government and primarily privately-financed.

NHS Commissioning Board

Question

Asked by Lord Hunt of Kings Heath

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what geographical relationship there is between the individual local arms of the NHS Commissioning Board and the strategic health authorities established in 2002. [HL1166]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The NHS Commissioning Board Authority (the preparatory body for the NHS Commissioning Board) has decided that the board should have 27 local area teams. Details of the areas they will cover were published on the Authority's website on 20 June and can be found at the following web address. https://www.wp.dh.gov.uk/commissioning board/files/2012/06/lat-senates-pack.pdf

The areas covered by the 27 local area teams have been determined primarily by reference to the coverage and boundaries of clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) and the boundaries of upper-tier local authorities. Other factors such as clinical networks and senates, local resilience forums and local health resilience partnerships were also taken into consideration.

The geographies of the former strategic health authorities (SHAs) established in 2002 were not considered by the authority when agreeing with the National Health Service, CCGs, local government and other partners the number and shape of the local area teams. While there is no deliberate relationship between

3 July 2012 : Column WA155

these areas and those of the 28 SHAs established in 2002, 13 of the 27 do have the same boundaries as those of the original SHAs: North West London;Durham, Darlington and Tees;Greater Manchester;West Yorkshire;Essex;Shropshire and Staffordshire;Birmingham and the Black Country;Arden, Hereford and Worcester;East Anglia;Kent and Medway;Surrey and Sussex;Devon and Cornwall; andNorth Yorkshire and the Humber.

NHS: Monitor

Questions

Asked by Lord Hunt of Kings Heath

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of whether Monitor’s role in economic regulation will be a barrier to integrated health care.[HL1064]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they will take to ensure that Monitor’s role in price setting will support the integration of NHS care. [HL1065]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The Health and Social Care Act states that Monitor must exercise its functions with a view to enabling the provision of integrated services, including integration of health and social care services, where this increases the quality of health services or reduces health inequalities. Monitor's duty to enable integration will also apply to its responsibilities for the national tariff, including developing proposals for calculating the prices to be paid for the services specified in the tariff.

Monitor will be required to report annually on how it has exercised its functions, including its duty to enable integration. It will lay these reports before Parliament.

NHS: Patient Data

Question

Asked by Lord Willis of Knaresborough

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what are the current barriers to the use by research groups of (1) anonymised, and (2) identifiable NHS patient data.[HL1138]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The law provides researchers access to anonymised data without permission. If personal identifiable data are required then the consent of the patient must be sought. The common law of confidentiality may be set aside using Section 251 of the National Health Service Act 2006, under which the Secretary of State may grant researchers such access as is important for the patient or the public good.

3 July 2012 : Column WA156

Non-departmental Public Bodies

Question

Asked by Lord Donoughue

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many non-departmental public bodies the Department of Energy and Climate Change has funded since May 2010; and how much funding in total has been allocated to those bodies.[HL1040]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Energy and Climate Change (Lord Marland): Details of the funding provided to the Department of Energy and Climate Change's non-departmental public bodies is published in its annual report and accounts.

Figures for the period 2009-11 can be found in Table 15 (Page 99) of “Department of Climate Change Annual Report and Accounts” http://www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/11/about-us/goals-commitments/2212-decc-annual-report-20102011.pdf)

Figures for 2011 -12 will be published in the annual report and accounts due to be laid before Parliament on 11 July 2012.

Overseas Aid

Questions

Asked by Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what proportion of United Kingdom official development assistance funding is not disbursed by the Department for International Development; who disburses this funding; and to what official development assistance this funding contributes.[HL1129]

Baroness Northover: In 2011, the proportion of United Kingdom official development assistance (ODA) funding not disbursed by DfID was calculated to be 11%. 2011 ODA figures are still provisional and will be updated in DfID's statistics on international development in the autumn.

DfID's Statistical Release on Provisional UK Official Development Assistance as a Proportion of Gross National Income, 2011 (see link below) identifies the other government departments that disburse ODA and the types of assistance provided.

http://www.dfid.gov.uk/News/Press-releases/2012/Provisional-UK-Official-Development-Assistance-as-a-proportion-of-Gross-National-Income-2011/.

Asked by Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Northover on 20 June (WA 302), which 20 non-governmental organisations, consultancies and contractors, excluding the United Nations, its agencies, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, have been the top recipients of United Kingdom aid in each year since 2008–09.[HL1183]

Baroness Northover: The 20 non-governmental organisations, consultancies and contractors, excluding the United Nations, its agencies, the World Bank and

3 July 2012 : Column WA157

the International Monetary Fund, which have been the top recipients of United Kingdom aid in each year since 2008-09 are detailed in the following table.

2008-092009-10

Standard Chartered Bank*

Adam Smith Int*

Crown Agents and Admin**

The Crown Agents*

HLSP Ltd*

VSO

Adam Smith Int*

GRM International*

Maxwell Stamp Plc*

KPMG Development Service

KPMG Development Service*

Crown Agents Govts and Admin

HTSPE Ltd*

Save the Children

British Council*

British Council

International Rescue Committee UK

International Rescue Committee UK

Oxford Policy Management*

HTSPE Ltd*

ATOS Consulting Limited*

British Council*

IMC Worldwide Ltd*

Oxfam

Options Consultancy Services Limited*

HLSP Ltd*

GRM International Ltd*

ABT Associates*

Capita Helm Corporation Ltd*

Cambridge Education*

Health Partners International*

International Aids Vaccine Initiative

Malaria Consortium*

Maxwell Stamp*

Cambridge Education Consul*

Merlin

Save the Children

Commonwealth Fund for Technical Co-operation

The British Red Cross Society

BMB Mott Macdonald*

2010-112011-12

Adam Smith Int*

The Crown Agents*

KPMG Development Service

SG Hambros

The Crown Agents*

Adam Smith Int*

Save the Children

Save the Children

GRM International*

KPMG Development Service

International Rescue Committee UK

International Rescue Committee UK

ABT Associates*

Price Waterhouse Cooper*

British Council*

GRM International*

Cambridge Education*

CSC

British Council

Cambridge Education*

IMC Worldwide*

ABT Associates*

Triple Line Consulting Limited

Maxwell Stamp*

Crown Agents Govts and Admin

Crown Agents Govts and Admin

HTSPE Ltd*

British Council*

Price Waterhouse Cooper*

Triple Line Consulting Limited

Commonwealth Fund for Technical Co-operation

HTSPE Ltd*

Medical Research Council

Medical Research Council

Society for Family Health*

Society for Family Health*

Merlin

IMC Worldwide Ltd*

BMB Mott Macdonald*

ATOS Consulting Limited*

* Spend relates to technical co-operation.

* * Spend covers technical co-operation and non governmental organisation activities.

Asked by Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Northover on 20 June (WA 302–3), what is the breakdown between programme and project aid, and what proportion each represents of the UK’s overall aid budget. [HL1184]

3 July 2012 : Column WA158

Baroness Northover: In terms of reporting amounts of United Kingdom aid, DfID does not distinguish between the terms “programme” or “project”.

Asked by Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Northover on 21 June (WA 320), since the establishment of the Independent Commission for Aid Impact (ICAI) what percentage of the Department for International Development’s work has been evaluated by the ICAI; and whether they consider this sufficient. [HL1187]

Baroness Northover: The Independent Commission for Aid Impact (ICAI) has reviewed past, current and future financial periods, looking at cross-cutting thematic areas such as anti-corruption as well as individual country programmes such as the climate change programme in Bangladesh. Given this methodology, it is not possible to state what percentage of the DfID programmes has been evaluated by ICAI. ICAI has produced its own three year work plan for May 2011 to May 2014 which covers key components of the UK Aid programme. This work plan can be found at http://icai.independent.gov.uk/publications.

ICAI reports directly to Parliament through the International Development Select Committee. It would be inappropriate for DfID to comment on the level of ICAI's coverage.

Palestine

Question

Asked by Baroness Tonge

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the value for money of the aid they provide to the Occupied Palestinian Territories.[HL1008]

Baroness Northover: Each new project is approved on the basis of a value for money assessment. This includes assessing the strength of the evidence provided in each business case for the intervention and comparing the efficiency and cost effectiveness of different delivery options. Each project is reviewed annually, and at project completion, to monitor the results that have been delivered. From 2012 a new assessment judging value for money has been introduced as part of these reviews and all reviews are publicly available.

DfID's operational plan for the Occupied Palestinian Territories contains an overarching review of its value for money and a results framework which is monitored annually to ensure results being delivered are in line with those planned. We assess that UK aid is on track to deliver key results as set out in our operational plan.

Results achieved through DfID support in 2011-12 include: 347 enterprises reporting improved performances in annual sales or productivity, interventions leading to the suspension of 124 eviction or demolition orders, 201,253 individuals covered by cash transfers and 43,187 children attending primary school.

3 July 2012 : Column WA159

Police: Fatalities and Injuries

Question

Asked by Viscount Simon

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many people in each police constabulary area were killed

3 July 2012 : Column WA160

or seriously injured on roads in each six-month period from October 2008 up to the latest period for which figures are held.[HL927]

Earl Attlee: The information requested is given in the following table:

Number of reported killed or seriously injured casualties by police force in each six month period from October 2008 until September 2011: Great Britain
Number of killed or seriously injured casualties
Oct 2008 - Mar 2009Apr 2009 - Sep 2009Oct 2009 - Mar 2010Apr 2010 - Sep 2010Oct 2010 - Mar 2011Apr 2011 - Sep 2011

Police Force

KSI1

KSI1

KSI1

KSI1

KSI1

KSI1

Metropolitan Police

1,531

1,599

1,503

1,517

1,272

1,421

Cumbria

115

147

83

151

107

132

Lancashire

419

461

361

465

352

419

Merseyside

285

277

275

221

279

257

Greater Manchester

400

422

354

394

347

396

Cheshire

306

331

255

325

273

320

Northumbria

290

317

243

289

217

233

Durham

96

154

106

117

96

115

North Yorkshire

300

318

265

296

227

307

West Yorkshire

520

510

440

497

420

471

South Yorkshire

284

244

266

214

226

235

Humberside

249

271

222

281

223

268

Cleveland

91

99

87

76

71

78

West Midlands

458

484

483

478

488

490

Staffordshire

149

165

137

148

110

139

West Mercia

232

291

184

221

168

216

Warwickshire

133

152

154

169

121

175

Derbyshire

248

308

226

229

177

220

Nottinghamshire

309

296

273

284

280

321

Lincolnshire

191

239

222

263

208

257

Leicestershire

170

215

167

187

180

184

Northamptonshire

179

219

151

167

143

171

Cambridgeshire

249

247

206

239

205

217

Norfolk

173

203

193

191

150

181

Suffolk

171

184

170

169

133

158

Bedfordshire

129

136

117

144

88

112

Hertfordshire

210

211

196

216

181

182

Essex

406

437

356

450

368

373

Thames Valley

447

527

431

482

481

508

Hampshire

475

466

427

519

480

598

Surrey

274

309

242

281

262

291

Kent

374

356

301

336

272

293

Sussex

469

511

430

438

415

501

City of London

23

28

17

21

23

24

Devon and Cornwall

226

240

222

315

294

283

Avon and Somerset

283

291

240

313

221

251

Gloucestershire

95

137

89

111

93

113

Wiltshire

164

154

168

159

152

144

Dorset

186

215

178

184

160

166

North Wales

173

197

130

170

149

235

Gwent

110

68

66

76

62

71

South Wales

158

191

168

191

154

173

Dyfed-Powys

174

193

133

193

146

210

Northern

88

105

60

89

58

82

Grampian

160

193

170

199

154

160

Tayside

114

150

100

120

95

122

Fife

61

71

49

76

58

57

Lothian and Borders

215

218

154

216

163

195

Central

76

72

54

73

49

74

Strathclyde

552

470

360

395

368

357

Dumfries and Galloway

43

72

47

34

41

57

3 July 2012 : Column WA161

3 July 2012 : Column WA162

Great Britain

13,233

14,171

11,931

13,389

11,460

13,013

1

Killed or seriously injured

Railways: Double Track