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Table 4: Achievement in Early Years Foundation Stage Profile teacher assessments by Gypsy/Roma and Traveller of Irish Heritage pupils
Years: 2010 to 20121
Coverage: England2
School Type: All types of schools or early education providers that deliver the EYFS to children in receipt of a government-funded place3
201020112012
EYFSPTraveller Of Irish HeritageGypsy/RomaTraveller Of Irish HeritageGypsy/RomaTraveller Of Irish HeritageGypsy/Roma

Number of eligible pupils2

391

913

435

1,174

498

1,289

Percentage achieving6 or more points in each of the 7 scales of PSE and CLL4

20

21

21

22

28

26

Percentage achieving78 or more points across all scales

41

40

42

41

47

45

Percentage achieving a good level of development5

20

21

21

22

28

26

Classified as being in the lowest 20% of achievement6

55

57

57

57

56

58

Source: National Pupil Database

1 Figures for all years are based on final data.

2 Only includes pupils with a valid result for every achievement scale.

3 All English providers of state-funded early years education (including Academies and Free Schools), private, voluntary and independent (PVI) sectors are within the scope of the EYFSP data collection. Data for any children in the PVI sector no longer in receipt of funding who were included in the return submitted by the LA to DfE will not be included in the figures.

4 A pupil who achieves 6 or more points in each of the 7 scales in the Personal, Social and Emotional development (PSE) and Communication, Language and Literacy areas of learning (CLL).

5 A pupil achieving 6 or more points across the 7 Scales of PSE and CLL and who also achieves 78 or more points across all 13 scales is classed as having “a good level of development”.

6 Percentage of pupils in this group who are classified as being in the lowest achieving 20%.

. = Not applicable.

Homelessness

Question

Asked by Baroness King of Bow

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by the Minister of State for Housing, Mark Prisk, on 18 January 2013 (Official Report, Commons, col. 957W), whether they will place in the Library of the House a copy of the note from their recent roundtable discussion with representatives of London boroughs with high homelessness numbers.[HL5248]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Communities and Local Government (Baroness Hanham): A copy of the note of the Homelessness Roundtable held on 4 December 2012 has been placed in the House Library.

Allowing homeless households to languish for long periods in expensive temporary accommodation is unfair to the taxpayer and unfair for the households themselves. This is why we have introduced a new power that will allow local housing authorities to end the main homelessness duty with offers of accommodation in the private rented sector without requiring the applicant’s agreement.

This gives authorities the freedom to make better use of good-quality private sector accommodation, which will mean less time spent in temporary accommodation—thereby allowing homeless households to move to settled accommodation more quickly. In addition, there will be more social lettings available to households on the waiting list who are in greatest need.

But we are not complacent about this important issue. We continue to work with the Mayor’s Office and London Councils to help to address this and we are looking at how we can increase the transparency and accountability around how authorities house vulnerable homeless families.

Horses

Question

Asked by Baroness Byford

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they will review the United Kingdom horse passport scheme; and, if so, when this will be completed. [HL5847]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord De Mauley): The Government remain committed to exploring ways to improve the horse passport system within the framework of European legislation. The Secretary of State, Owen Paterson, and I met representatives of various equine sectors on 21 February to discuss such issues.

5 Mar 2013 : Column WA397

House of Lords: Members

Question

Asked by Lord Beecham

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Hill of Oareford on 13 February (WA 165) stating that they have no further plans for legislation to reform the House of Lords in this Parliament, whether they intend to appoint further Members to reflect the outcome of the last general election; whether they have taken a view as to the appropriate size of the membership of the House in the absence of legislation to reform it; and, if so, what is that view.[HL5718]

The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (Lord Hill of Oareford): As stated in the programme for government, appointments will be made to the House of Lords with the objective of creating a second Chamber that reflects the share of the vote secured by the political parties at the last general election.

The Government believe that the question of the optimum size of the House of Lords can only be addressed appropriately in legislation for comprehensive reform.

Mayor of London

Question

Asked by Lord Harris of Haringey

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what representations they have received from the Mayor of London in the last year on (1) health services in London, (2) housing provision in London, and (3) the impact of changes in welfare benefits on the people of London.[HL5797]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Communities and Local Government (Baroness Hanham): The Department of Health has held a number of discussions over the last year with the Greater London Authority, London Councils and the Local Government Association about the London Health Improvement Board. We recognise that there is potential for delivering health improvement services on a city-wide basis in London. The London Health Improvement Board has been meeting since July 2011.

The Localism Act conferred on the Mayor of London responsibility for housing, economic development and Olympic legacy in London, in addition to existing responsibilities over transport, planning and the police. Therefore, the mayor is responsible for housing and regeneration policy in London. The Department for Communities and Local Government has regular conversations with the Mayor of London and the Greater London Authority regarding housing provision in London. Over the last year these conversations have focused on a broad range of issues, such as funding and delivery of affordable housing, increasing investment in the private rented sector, getting surplus public sector land back into use and dealing with homelessness and rough sleeping.

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The Department for Work and Pensions and the Department for Communities and Local Government have had and continue to have regular discussions with representatives from the Greater London Authority, London Councils and London local authorities on a wide range of welfare reform issues.

The Department for Communities and Local Government has also received representations from the Greater London Authority in response to the consultations on funding arrangements and changes to the tax base in relation to the localisation of council tax support.

NHS PropCo

Questions

Asked by Lord Greaves

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what management arrangements at regional and local level are being made by NHS PropCo (1) in the North West, and (2) elsewhere in England.[HL5773]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many persons will be employed by NHS PropCo on 1 April 2013; where they will be located; and how many employees will be located in each place. [HL5774]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): National Health Service Property Services Ltd (NHS PS) will consist nationally of a small board of directors, with most of its staff being at a regional and local level. It has four regional directors (North of England, Midlands and East, London and South of England), with teams that will work closely with the new NHS structure, and with the majority of staff being locally based and delivering services to patients, NHS staff and the public.

The precise number of staff to be employed by NHS PS, locally and nationally, is not yet known. However, it is anticipated that some 3,000 staff working in estates and facilities roles in primary care trusts (PCTs) and strategic health authorities will transfer under transfer of undertaking protection of employment legislation to the company. Staff will transfer on 1 April 2013. The company is recruiting to a further 72 posts to fulfil corporate roles such as in finance, information technology and human resources. This type of support is now provided to local estates teams by the PCTs of which they are currently part.

Asked by Lord Greaves

To ask Her Majesty’s Government which NHS properties in Lancashire will be transferred to NHS PropCo; and which properties owned by primary care trusts will be transferred to (a) NHS trusts, (b) clinical commissioning groups, and (c) other bodies. [HL5775]

Earl Howe: The department is currently reviewing and finalising the provisionally agreed lists of NHS properties due to transfer to National Health Service

5 Mar 2013 : Column WA399

bodies or NHS Property Services Ltd. These will shortly be approved and actual transfers of estate will take place on 1 April 2013.

Northern Ireland Parades Commission

Questions

Asked by Lord Laird

To ask Her Majesty’s Government who has resigned from the Northern Ireland Parades Commission since 2009; when and why; and who replaced them. [HL5758]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Wales Office (Baroness Randerson): Since 2009, two members of the Parades Commission for Northern Ireland have resigned their posts. Ms Anne Monaghan resigned with effect from 31 December 2009 and was subsequently replaced by Mr Michael Doherty. Dr Catriona King resigned with effect from 31 January 2013; arrangements for a replacement will be made in due course. In each case, the decision to resign was a personal matter for the individuals concerned.

Asked by Lord Laird

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many complaints have been made against members of staff of the Northern Ireland Parades Commission by (1) members of staff of that organisation, and (2) members of the public; and what was the outcome of any inquiries held as a result.[HL5815]

Baroness Randerson: The Parades Commission for Northern Ireland is independent of government. The noble Lord may wish to write to the commission direct on these matters.

Overseas Aid

Question

Asked by Lord Teverson

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what emphasis they place on establishing and implementing aid programmes that transfer engineering and design knowledge and suitable technology.[HL5713]

Baroness Northover: The UK Government are committed to ensuring high-quality scientific and engineering evidence is effectively integrated into policy development and delivery. DfID’s allocation of £56 million up to 2020 on scientific and engineering research capacity strengthening in developing countries is a clear acknowledgement of the important role capacity building has (as part of its portfolio of interventions) in meeting the millennium development goals.

The Africa Community Access Project (AFCAP) is one example of a highly successful DfID-funded programme of research, knowledge dissemination and training on rural transport. Engineering research under AFCAP is changing the way rural, low-volume roads are designed, built and maintained. The AFCAP road design manuals will influence the construction and

5 Mar 2013 : Column WA400

maintenance of 70,000 kilometres of roads in Ethiopia by 2020. The manuals being developed for the other five focus countries will similarly influence their entire low-volume road networks. The total length of these road networks is 194,500 kilometres.

Police and Crime Commissioners

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Taylor of Holbeach on 25 February (WA 257), what representations they have received about the selection process for the deputy and assistant crime commissioners in South Wales.[HL5816]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): The Government have received no representations about the selection process for deputy or assistant police and crime commissioners (PCCs) in South Wales. It is for the PCC to select his team and justify his decisions to the community he serves.

Police and Crime Commissioners: Elections

Question

Asked by Lord Condon

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their assessment of the recommendations made in the Electoral Reform Society’s report “How not to run an election: The Police and Crime Commissioner Elections 2012”.[HL5745]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): The police and crime commissioner elections marked a landmark democratic reform of policing. More than 5 million people voted, a number that is likely to grow in future elections as people see the real impact PCCs are already making in their areas. The Home Office will consider the points made in the report, alongside the conclusions of the Electoral Commission’s assessment when it is published.

Schools: Academies

Question

Asked by Lord Greaves

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether financial inducements are being offered to primary and secondary schools to encourage them to convert to academies in Lancashire and in other parts of the country; and, if so, what is the size of such inducements in each area.[HL5620]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Nash): Schools which are becoming academies are entitled to grants and legal fees to support the improvements needed.

5 Mar 2013 : Column WA401

All schools becoming sponsored academies will receive £25,000 to cover costs such as legal expenses. This funding is either paid directly to the school or to the sponsor, depending on who will be incurring the costs.

Sponsors are able to claim up to a further £40,000 for a primary, or up to £65,000 for a secondary, where there is evidence that this is needed to plan for and start to implement action to transform the underperforming school. Funding of up to £200,000 is available for schools that face significant educational problems and require intensive support from the sponsor and the department.

The department will expect this funding to make a rapid difference in securing improvements.

This funding existed under the last Government and we have been clear and open about what is available with all information on our website.

Schools: Asbestos

Questions

Asked by Lord Wigley

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their estimate of the number of schools in England which have asbestos in their buildings; and what is the estimated cost of clearing all such schools of asbestos.[HL5167]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Nash): The Department for Education does not collect information on the presence and condition of asbestos in schools or the estimated cost of clearing it. The control of asbestos regulations require duty holders to collect this information.

The Department for Education does not have information on the number of schools in England that have been cleared of asbestos during the past five years or the estimated cost of doing so. These are matters for the duty holders and the local management of schools.

However, we know that the majority of existing schools were built in the period up to 1999 when the use of asbestos was banned. Up until then, asbestos was used in some form in most building works, whether domestic or non-domestic.

Asked by Lord Wigley

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many schools in England have been cleared of asbestos during the past five years; and what is the estimated cost of so doing.[HL5168]

Lord Nash: The Department for Education does not collect information on the presence and condition of asbestos in schools or the estimated cost of clearing it. The control of asbestos regulations require duty holders to collect this information.

The Department for Education does not have information on the number of schools in England that have been cleared of asbestos during the past five years or the estimated cost of doing so. These are matters for the duty holders and the local management of schools.

5 Mar 2013 : Column WA402

Schools: Nurses

Question

Asked by Lord Bradley

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many school nurses were employed by (1) primary schools, and (2) secondary schools, in England in each of the past five years.[HL5798]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The information requested on numbers of school nurses employed by primary and secondary schools is not collected centrally. School nurses are employed by a variety of employers, including the National Health Service and state and independent schools.

The annual workforce census published by the Health and Social Care Information Centre collects the number of school nurses (with the post-registration school nurse qualification) employed by the NHS in England at 30 September each year up to 2011. It does not capture those employed by state and independent schools or other non-NHS employers. A number of qualified school nurses will also work conterminously across primary care trust (PCT) boundaries but be employed directly by one single PCT.

Information on the number of qualified school nurses employed in the NHS in 2012 will be available following publication of the annual workforce census on 21 March 2013.

The number of qualified school nurses employed by the NHS in England in each of the past five years is shown in the following table:

NHS Hospital and Community Health Services: School Nurses, as at 30 September, 2007 to 2011
England as at 30 September each yearFull-time equivalent
20072008200920102011

School nurse

892

1,045

1,167

1,096

1,165

Notes:

Full-time equivalent figures are rounded to the nearest whole number.

The figures only include those school nurses directly employed by the NHS in England as we do not hold information on those school nurses directly employed by schools or local education authorities.

Data quality:

The Health and Social Care Information Centre seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data but responsibility for data accuracy lies with the organisations providing the data. Methods are continually being updated to improve data quality where changes impact on figures already published. This is assessed but, unless it is significant at national level, figures are not changed. Impact at detailed or local level is footnoted in relevant analyses.

Source:

Health and Social Care Information Centre Non-Medical Workforce Census.

Sri Lanka

Question

Asked by Baroness Kinnock of Holyhead

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they currently have plans forcibly to return Sri Lankan refugees living in the United Kingdom.[HL5689]

5 Mar 2013 : Column WA403

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): The UK Border Agency does not return refugees. The UK Border Agency only returns individuals, including failed asylum seekers, whom it and the courts have found not to be in need of international protection and who have chosen not to leave the UK voluntarily. Enforced returns are only undertaken when it is safe to do so.

Trading Standards Officers

Question

Asked by Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many trading standards officers are currently in post; and how many were in post in May 2010 and in May 2011.[HL5742]

5 Mar 2013 : Column WA404

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Communities and Local Government (Baroness Hanham): The information requested is not collected by the Department for Communities and Local Government.

Women’s Business Council

Question

Asked by Baroness Nye

To ask Her Majesty’s Government when the Women’s Business Council report will be published. [HL5763]

Baroness Stowell of Beeston: The council will publish its report and recommendations later in 2013.