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Written Answers

Answers received between Tuesday 30 July 2013and Monday 5 August 2013

Abortion

Question

Asked by Lord Rooker

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what information they hold regarding the number of neural tube defect-affected pregnancies leading to terminations, at the latest convenient date.[HL1739]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): In 2012, for residents of England and Wales, there were 390 abortions where neural tube defect was given as the primary diagnosis of the foetus reported under Ground E (that there is a substantial risk that if the child were born it would suffer from such physical or mental abnormalities as to be seriously handicapped). The breakdown was; Anencephaly (ICD10 Code Q00) 208 cases; Encephalocele (LCD 10 Code Q01) 33 cases, and Spina Bifida (ICD10 Code Q05) 149 cases.

In addition, there are cases where a neural tube defect is reported along with other medical conditions given under Ground E, and here there were 422 cases. The breakdown was; Anencephaly (ICD10 Code Q00) 216 cases; Encephalocele (ICD 10 Code Q01) 39 cases, and Spina Bifida (ICD10 Code Q05) 167 cases.

Agriculture: Pesticides

Questions

Asked by Lord Willoughby de Broke

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how science-based field tests on the effect of neonicotinoids pesticides on bees will be carried out following the suspension of the use of neonicotinoids in the European Union from 1 June 2014.[HL2103]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord De Mauley): The restrictions on the three neonicotinoid insecticides covered by Regulation 485/2013 apply from 1 December 2013, with the Commission providing for a review in 2015. Authorisations for experimental field trials will be possible while the restrictions are in place. Pesticide companies may generate new studies, taking account of the data requirements set out in the EU pesticides regime and any further changes to these. The Government, in consultation with independent experts, is considering additional research, including field studies. We would expect the outcome of the Commission’s review 2015 to take appropriate account of any new evidence.

Asked by Lord Willoughby de Broke

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether the Pesticides Advisory Committee supports the suspension of the use of neonicotinoid pesticides in the United Kingdom.[HL2104]

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Lord De Mauley: The independent Advisory Committee on Pesticides (ACP) has considered the evidence on neonicotinoid insecticides on a number of occasions. Following its meeting on 29 January 2013 the Committee advised that there were grounds for a review of neonicotinoid authorisations under the pesticides legislation, and officials in the Health and Safety Executive's Chemicals Regulation Directorate (the UK pesticides regulatory body) have started this work. The detailed record of the ACP’s discussions can be found on its website at:

http://www.pesticides.gov.uk/guidance/industries/pesticides/advisory-groups/acp/acp-detailed-record-of-discussion/ACP-359-29-January-2013-Detailed-Record-of-Discussion.htm

The ACP provided further advice following their meeting in March. Again, this is available on its website.

The ACP did not advise that there was a need to restrict current authorisations of products containing neonicotinoids.

Air Pollution

Questions

Asked by Lord Berkeley

To ask Her Majesty’s Government when they plan (1) to publish for every local authority area in England the number of deaths attributable to exposure to annual mean PM2.5 particulate matter and the resulting years of life lost, as recommended by the Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants, and (2) to update those figures and the attributable fraction for 2011 and 2012.[HL1884]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): Public Health England (PHE) intends to publish estimates of mortality from long term exposure to particulate air pollution (annual mean PM2.5) in 2010 for all unitary, upper and lower tier local authorities in the United Kingdom in terms of attributable deaths and associated years of life lost, as recommended by the Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants (COMEAP). This report is currently undergoing an internal review process and is expected to be published later this year after completion of the review process.

PHE is not currently planning to update the figures of attributable deaths and years of life lost for 2011 and 2012. However, PHE will publish annually estimates of the fraction of mortality attributable to long-term exposure to particulate air pollution for all upper tier and unitary authorities in England, as one of the indicators within the Public Health Outcomes Framework for England. PHE will also publish guidance for local authorities that may wish to generate their own mortality burden estimates.

Asked by Viscount Ridley

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many micrograms per cubic metre of air of small particulates PM2.5 they expect to originate in 2020 from emissions from biomass combustion in the industrial generation

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of electricity and in domestic use, excluding any deduction from the gross total for emissions from fuels displaced by biomass.[HL1895]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord De Mauley): Emissions of particles from biomass electricity generation are estimated to contribute 0.00096 micrograms of small particulates (particulate matter up to 2.5 micrometres in size, or PM2.5) per cubic metre of air (micrograms/m3) to the total population-weighted mean concentration of PM2.5 in the UK in 2020 of 9.47 micrograms/m3.

Biomass combustion is expected to increase in the domestic sector when the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) scheme is extended to domestic boilers in spring 2014. However, the domestic scheme is aimed at off-gas grid users and substitutes some coal and oil use, therefore the dispersion model estimates an overall net decrease in the population weighted mean PM2.5 concentration of 0.0005 micrograms/m3 in 2020. As the model results are based on spatially mapped net emissions data, it is not possible to estimate the change in concentrations arising from biomass combustion alone.

Wood burning emissions from domestic heating outside the RHI scheme, such as open fires and stoves, are projected to contribute 0.209 microgram/m3 of PM2.5to the population weighted mean UK PM2.5 concentration in 2020.

Armed Forces: Defence Budget

Question

Asked by Lord West of Spithead

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answers by Lord Astor of Hever on 11 June (WA 224) and 22 July (WA 160), whether there was any underspend in 2010–11 in the Ministry of Defence.[HL1982]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence (Lord Astor of Hever): In 2010-11, there was no underspend against the core defence budget (in near-cash terms).

Bank of England

Question

Asked by Lord Myners

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether, in the light of the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills’ comments describing Bank of England officials as “capital Taliban”, they have any plans to review the performance and competence of the Bank and the Prudential Regulatory Authority. [HL1970]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Deighton): The Financial Services Act 2012 introduced a new system of financial services regulation effective

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from 1 April 2013. The Government has no plans to review the performance and competence of the Bank and the PRA at this stage.

Banking

Question

Asked by Lord Myners

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they have assessed whether capital shortfalls have limited the capacity of United Kingdom banks to support the credit needs of United Kingdom borrowers. [HL1971]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Deighton): UK banks, building societies and credit unions are regulated by the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA). In March, the interim Financial Policy Committee (FPC) made a series of recommendations to strengthen the resilience of major UK banks and building societies On 20 June, the PRA provided an update on progress in implementing these recommendations.

Consistent with the FPC recommendations, the PRA has asked firms to ensure that all plans to address shortfalls do not reduce lending to the real economy.

The Government does not comment on specific recommendations for and by the FPC or the PRA, nor in relation to specific institutions.

Banking: Capital Leverage

Questions

Asked by Lord Myners

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they have been lobbied, at ministerial or official level, by or on behalf of Nationwide on the matter of capital leverage targets; and whether they subsequently communicated on that matter with the Prudential Regulatory Authority.[HL1954]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Deighton): Treasury Ministers and officials meet with, and receive representations from, a wide range of organisations and individuals in the public and private sectors. As was the case with previous Administrations, it is not the Treasury's practice to provide details of all such representations.

Asked by Lord Myners

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether ministers or officials of HM Treasury have lobbied the Bank of England or the Prudential Regulatory Authority on behalf of the Nationwide Building Society in respect of capital leverage.[HL1974]

Lord Deighton: Treasury Ministers and officials meet with, and receive representations from, a wide range of organisations and individuals in the public

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and private sectors. As was the case with previous Administrations, it is not the Treasury's practice to provide details of all such representations.

Asked by Lord Myners

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether bank capital leverage targets are set, in amount and time to comply, by HM Treasury or the Bank of England or the Prudential Regulatory Authority; and who is responsible for monitoring compliance.[HL1975]

Lord Deighton: Bank capital leverage targets are set by the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA). The PRA is also responsible for monitoring compliance.

Benefits

Questions

Asked by Baroness Brinton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many people with rheumatoid arthritis (1) applied for Disability Living Allowance, and (2) were awarded Disability Living Allowance, in each of the last five years.[HL1999]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many people with rheumatoid arthritis were awarded (1) the higher rate mobility component, and (2) the lower rate mobility component, of Disability Living Allowance in each of the last five years.[HL2000]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many people with rheumatoid arthritis have been in receipt of a motability vehicle in each of the last five years.[HL2002]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Work and Pensions (Lord Freud): Data on numbers of people in receipt of Disability Living Allowance (DLA), in each of the last five years, can be found at:

http://tabulation-tool.dwp.gov.uk/100pc/tabtool.html (guidance on how to use the tab tool is at the bottom of the front page.)

Data on numbers of those who applied for Disability Living Allowance (DLA) and were subsequently awarded is not available and to obtain it would be at disproportionate cost.

Data on numbers of people with rheumatoid arthritis in receipt of the higher-rate mobility component and lower-rate mobility component of DLA, in the last five years, is as follows:

DateTotal with higher mobility rateTotal with lower mobility rateTotal with nil rate

Nov-08

452,110

8,540

63,270

Nov-09

399,790

6,980

53,750

Nov-10

358,400

5,840

47,000

Nov-11

331,070

5,230

43,300

Nov-12

307,820

4,780

40,180

Source: DWP Information Governance and Security: Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study.

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Notes:

1. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.

2. Totals show numbers of people in receipt of an allowance and excludes cases where the payment has been suspended, e.g. if they are in hospital.

3. A diagnosed medical condition does not mean that someone is automatically entitled to DLA. Entitlement is dependent on an assessment of how much help someone needs with personal care and/or mobility because of their disability. These statistics are only collected for administrative purposes.

4. DLA care and mobility components can be paid together or on their own. The nil payment column is where the claimant is in receipt of the care component and not the mobility component.

The Department does not hold information on the numbers of Motability customers with rheumatoid arthritis. This information may be held by the Motability scheme and you can write to them at the following address:

The Director,

Motability,Warwick House,Roydon Road, Harlow,EssexCM19 5PX

Benefits: Motability Scheme

Question

Asked by Baroness Gardner of Parkes

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they will permit individuals with a Motability vehicle to retain that vehicle until the outcome of any appeal relating to their participation in the Motability scheme is determined.[HL2087]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Work and Pensions (Lord Freud): Motability is an independent charitable organisation, wholly responsible for the administration of the Motability scheme. Questions relating to scheme policy on withdrawal of vehicles should be directed to Motability and can be sent to: Declan O’Mahony, Director, Motability, Warwick House, Roydon Road, Harlow, Essex CM19 SPX.

Burma

Question

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what export control licences have been granted for goods to Burma in the last five years.[HL2019]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Viscount Younger of Leckie): Information on arms exports is published in the Annual and Quarterly Reports on Strategic Export Controls. These reports contain detailed information on export licences issued, refused or revoked, by destination, including the overall value, type (eg Military, Other) and a summary of the items covered by the licences.

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They are available to view on the Strategic Export Controls Reports and Statistics Website at: https://www.exportcontroldb.bis.gov.uk/eng/fox.

By registering on the website it is possible to create your own bespoke reports by country.

The reports currently available provide information up to 31 March 2013. Information covering the next quarterly period to be published, 1 April 2013 to 30 June 2013, is due to be published in the first week of October.

Children and Families Bill

Question

Asked by Lord Touhig

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessments they have made of the cost of investigating complaints about education, health and care assessments under (1) the proposals set out in the Children and Families Bill, and (2) a single point of appeal and redress conducted by the Special Educational Needs and Disability Tribunal.[HL1807]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Nash): The Government published an assessment of the impact to help with Parliamentary scrutiny of clauses in the Children and Families Bill that relate to special educational needs. The “Appeals and Mediation” section focuses on special educational needs appeals to the First-tier Tribunal (Special Educational Needs and Disability) and the likely impact eta wider cohort of those who can appeal, set against the possible effect of the proposals for mediation information and, if requested, mediation for those who intend to appeal to the Tribunal. It does not cover the effect on the number of complaints to bodies which deal with health and social care complaints. Nor does it give estimated costs of making the Tribunal the single point of appeal and redress. This is not proposed by the Bill.

A copy of “Evidence Pack: Special Educational Needs: Children and Families Bill 2013” is in the House Library.

http://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/pdf/s/sen%20evidence%20pack.pdf

Children: Childcare

Question

Asked by The Earl of Listowel

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what calculations they have made of the impact of increased availability of high-quality affordable childcare on growth and employment.[HL1897]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Nash): The Department for Education has conducted a number of surveys on the effects of affordable childcare on employment, finding evidence that:

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more than half of stay-at-home mothers would prefer to be in paid employment if they could arrange appropriate affordable, high-quality childcare; and

a quarter of working mothers would increase their hours if they could arrange such childcare.

These findings are echoed by the Women's Business Council report of July 2013, which indicates that there are 2.4 million women who are not in work but want to work and a further 1.3 million who want to increase their hours.

This report also estimates that if women wererepresented in the same numbers as men in the workforce, GDP growth would be up to 10% higher by 2030.

Coroners and Justice Act 2009

Questions

Asked by Baroness Golding

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they intend to implement in full section 28 of the Coroners and Justice Act 2009; and, if so, when.[HL1684]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what studies have been made since the passing of the Coroners and Justice Act 2009 as to the impact of implementing the provisions of section 28 of that Act.[HL1685]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, in the light of section 28 of the Coroners and Justice Act 2009, whether they have plans to conduct pilot schemes allowing all evidence given by children in sexual cases to be video recorded rather than given viva voce.[HL1686]

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord McNally): The Secretary of State announced on 11 June 2013 the Government's plan to pilot Section 28 of the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999 in three Crown Court locations—Liverpool, Leeds and Kingston-Upon-Thames. The pilots will run for six months followed by an assessment period with the intention of rolling the measure out more widely if it proves a success.

The announcement followed many months work on how best to test pre-trial cross-examination, working closely with the judiciary, courts, police and CPS. Piloting this legislation is an element of the recently published—“Transforming the Criminal Justice System: A Strategy And Action Plan to Reform the Criminal Justice System”, paper which will provide extra support for victims and witnesses by offering them greater protection throughout the criminal justice process, a louder voice and better redress.

Council Tax

Question

Asked by Baroness King of Bow

To ask Her Majesty’s Government , further to the Written Answer by Baroness Hanham on 20 June (WA 66), how much of the £46.5 million underspend

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA313

in the Transition Fund for local Council Tax Support schemes will be made available to local authorities in 2014–15.[HL1372]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Communities and Local Government (Baroness Hanham): The Department for Communities and Local Government has two distinct budgets - one to support measures in the local government settlement and one to support the department's wider work on areas such as housing, economic growth and localism.

The funding for the voluntary, one-year, transition grant was additional funding found for this issue from within the 2012-13 budget for the department's wider work.

Although the scheme was taken up by two-thirds of billing authorities, when an element of this funding was not required it was therefore released back to support those wider priorities. 'I here is no read across to spending or budgets in 2014-15.

As outlined in my statement of 15 October 2012, Official Report, Column 163 WS, the transitional grant was for one year to encourage best practice in the new schemes and to give local authorities space to realise savings from areas such as cutting fraud and error (which saw £230 million wrongly paid out in 2012-13).

The localisation of council tax support is helping tackle the deficit left by the last Administration, delivering ongoing savings of £470 million a year of taxpayers’ money. It also gives all councils stronger incentives to cut fraud, promote local enterprise and get people back into work.

Courts: Child Witnesses

Question

Asked by Baroness Golding

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether, in the light of recent trials dealing with sexual offences, guidance will be given to trial judges about protecting child witnesses from extensive cross-examination by defence counsel.[HL1687]

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord McNally): In managing trials, judges are guided by principles contained in the Criminal Procedure Rules produced by the Criminal Procedure Rule Committee and to Practice Directions and Notes issued by the senior judiciary. In addition, for particular types of crime, judges receive specialist training through the Judicial College.

Judges have power to make sure courts are no place for character assassination. In accordance with professional codes of conduct, defence barristers should not ask questions that are offensive, unnecessary or scandalous. There is absolutely no place for aggression within our courts, and many judges make full use of the powers available to them,

Although judges have the power to intervene to prevent overly aggressive cross-examination and character assassinations, there are a number of recent examples

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of victims being left traumatised after court cases. The Secretary of State announced on 11 June 2013 the Government’s plan to pilot section 28 of the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999 in three Crown Court locations for six months. In addition, the Government announced on 30 June 2013 its intention to review how the distress caused to victims through cross-examination might he reduced. This review, to be conducted over the summer, will look in particular at the cross-examination of vulnerable victims, including children, by multiple defence counsel.

Courts: Magistrates' Courts

Question

Asked by Lord Beecham

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what guidance they issue to magistrates about communicating with Members of Parliament, police and crime commissioners and local councillors about issues relating to crime and disorder, family law or licensing; and whether any qualifications apply to magistrates' freedom to speak on such matters.[HL1628]

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord McNally): The Lord Chief Justice is responsible for guidance to the judiciary in England and Wales on matters of personal conduct. In November 2012, the Senior Presiding Judge, on behalf of the Lord Chief Justice, issued guidance on working with police and crime commissioners (PCCs). A copy of that guidance will be deposited in the Libraries of both Houses. No specific guidance has been issued about magistrates communicating with Members of Parliament or local councillors. However, in all matters of personal conduct, magistrates are expected to be circumspect and to maintain the dignity, standing and good reputation of the magistracy at all times.

Education: Independent Reviewing Officers

Question

Asked by Lord Black of Brentwood

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they intend to take steps to reform the system of Independent Reviewing Officers in the light of the Ofsted report Independent Reviewing Officers: taking up the challenge.[HL1736]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Nash): We strengthened the role of the Independent Reviewing Officers (IRO) in 2011 to ensure each child has a named IRO who has independent oversight of the child’s case and can review their care plan.

We recognise that more needs to be done to ensure that IROs across the country are working effectively and consistently so that all looked after children receive a top quality service. In May we held a Roundtable with IRO managers, local government and voluntary sector partners to consider the role of the IRO in light of Ofsted’s report. It was agreed that there was some

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA315

excellent local practice which needed to be spread to all local authorities. Key aspects of an excellent service that we identified are:

IROs having the required skills, training, and knowledge to undertake all duties set out in the IRO Handbook;

IROs having manageable caseloads and the ability to effectively challenge poor practice;

The quality of the IRO service is continuously improved by managers and IROs acting on feedback from children and young people;

Annual reports on IROs performance are published and discussed with lead members and Director of Children’s Services (DCS).

Following the Roundtable discussion the Children and Families Minister, Edward Timpson, wrote to all DCS asking that they review and improve their IRO services, in line with Ofsted’s recommendations.

The Government is working closely with the IRO sector to drive forward improvements and we have asked Ofsted to shine a light on the quality of IRO services through their revised inspection framework which comes into force in September 2013.

Elections: Voters

Question

Asked by Lord Ashcroft

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether any consideration is being given to allowing all British citizens the right to vote in General Elections. [HL1749]

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon: British and Irish citizens are entitled to register to vote in UK parliamentary elections, provided that the other registration criteria are also met. To be eligible to register a person must: be resident in the constituency (subject to certain exceptions), be over 18 or become 18 within the lifetime of the next electoral register, and not be subject to any legal incapacity to vote.

The Representation of the People Act 1985 provides for British citizens resident overseas to be able to register to vote in UK parliamentary elections, provided that they have been registered in the UK in the past 15 years.

The Government is open to discussion about whether the 15-year time limit remains appropriate but is not minded at present to change the law.

It is the Government’s strong view that whether prisoners are entitled to vote is a matter for Parliament.

Embryology

Question

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answers by Earl Howe on 8 January (WA 22–3) and 23 January (WA 216–17) and the Written Statement by Earl Howe on 17 July (WS 114–15), whether it remains the case that the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) has limited powers concerning ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) and that there is no clear mechanism through which the HFEA

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can mitigate the risks of OHSS; if so, how the HFEA will implement the recommendations in the report of the independent review by Dr Justin McCracken regarding risks such as OHSS; and, if not, when and how the circumstances changed to make it possible for the HFEA to play a role in mitigating such risks. [HL1929]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): There is no change in the position set out in my Written Answers of 8 January 2013 Official Report, columns WA 22-3 and 23 January 2013 Official Report, columns. WA 216-17.

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) has also advised that it welcomes the recommendations set out in the independent review carried out by Mr McCracken. It is currently considering these recommendations and will report on progress to the next meeting of the Authority in September 2013.

Employment: Work Capability Assessments

Question

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what are the total sums of public funds paid to date to Atos Healthcare; and what will be paid to it in each of the coming years in which it is contracted to the Department for Work and Pensions.[HL1931]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Work and Pensions (Lord Freud): The current Medical Services Contract with Atos Healthcare commenced on September 1st 2005 Spending on the Contract since then has been as follows:

Sept 2005 to March 2006 £73,300,000

April 2006 to March 2007 £60,200,000

April 2007 to March 2008 £70,200,000

April 2008 to March 2009 £111,800,000

April 2009 to March 2010 £99,100,000

April 2010 to March 2011 £112,800,000

April 2011 to March 2012 £112,400,000

April 2012 to March 2013 £114,300,000

The figures in the table not only cover the total number of assessments undertaken across all benefits, including IS Reassessment, but also costs relating to written and verbal medical advice, fixed overheads, administrative costs, investments new technology and other service improvements.

In respect of what will be paid to Atos Healthcare in each of the coming years for the Medical Services Contract this information is not currently available as the contract is consumption based. This means that future payments will be predicted on the volume of assessments, change and infrastructural upgrades undertaken by Atos.

The increase in the figures is due to a rise in the volumes going through the Medical Services Contract between the Department and Atos Healthcare.

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There was a small increase in the cost of the exam over the period, however the main reason for the increase in spend was the introduction of Employment Support Allowance (ESA) by the last government from November 2008 followed by Incapacity Benefit Reassessment (IBA) starting in March 2011.

Energy: Carbon Emissions

Question

Asked by Viscount Ridley

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many milligrams of carbon dioxide they estimate are produced per kilowatt-hour of electricity generated from (1) coal, (2) oil, (3) gas, and (4) biomass, excluding any deduction from the gross total for carbon dioxide absorbed by growing vegetation. [HL1896]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Energy and Climate Change (Baroness Verma): Table 1 below gives the estimated emissions from electricity generated by coal and gas (given as grams of CO2 per kilowatt hour supplied). These are taken from table 5C of the Digest of UK Energy Statistics. Due to the small amounts of oil now used in electricity generation these figures are no longer published.

Table I: Carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation

FuelgCO2/kWh

Coal

895

Gas

415

The carbon intensity of biomass varies, depending on the type of biomass (e.g. wood pellet, manure, saw mill residues), its country of origin, and emissions associated with processing the biomass and transporting it to the power station. Typical estimated emissions from power generation from biomass range between 50 and 280 g CO2 equivalent per kWh electricity. These figures are calculated using the European Commission RED Life Cycle Analysis methodology, which assumes that absorption of carbon dioxide by the biomass growth is equal to that emitted by combustion, unless the land use has changed categories since 2008, in which case any reduction in carbon stored on the land is accounted for.

Energy: Shale Gas

Question

Asked by Lord Marlesford

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they have received evidence of any case of contamination of an aquifer or other groundwater from the exploration for, or production of, gas or oil from shale in the United States.[HL1923]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Energy and Climate Change (Baroness Verma): We are not aware of evidence which is specific to exploration

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or production of shale gas or oil. As regards gas operations more generally, however, we are aware of evidence of the contamination of aquifers with methane, and of contamination of watercourses with chemicals from surface operations. For example a 2011 publication by

MIT, The Future of Natural Gas,

summarises information on over forty such cases reported between 2005 and 2009 http://mitei.mit.edu/system/files/NaturalGas_ Appendix2E.pdf.

We are not aware of any confirmed case of contamination of an aquifer with fracking fluids.

EU: Justice and Home Affairs Measures

Question

Asked by The Lord Bishop of Wakefield

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether, prior to their decision on 9 July to opt out of 130 European Union Justice and Home Affairs measures as provided for by the Lisbon Treaty, guarantees were provided by the European Commission that the United Kingdom would be able to opt back in to various police and justice provisions.[HL1650]

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord McNally): Protocol 36 to the Treaties places an obligation on the UK and the Union institutions to, “...seek to re-establish the widest possible measure of participation of the United Kingdom in the acquis of the Union in the area of freedom, security and justice without seriously affecting practical operability of the various parts thereof, while respecting their coherence”. We are confident that we will be able to reach agreement on a sensible final package of measures that the UK will formally apply to rejoin.

Of course it is not possible to predict the final outcome of the discussions with EU institutions, but following the Governments announcement on 9 July the Commission made clear in a press release that it “respects the UK Government’s choice to opt out, which is in line with the Treaty, and welcomes the UK intention to also opt back into certain measures”.

Female Genital Mutilation

Question

Asked by Baroness Cox

To ask Her Majesty’s Government to how many, and to which, countries the Statement Opposing Female Genital Mutilation has been sent; and whether there are any early indicators of its impact.[HL1991]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): The “Statement Opposing Female Genital Mutilation” leaflet has been in circulation as a pilot since October 2012. As of 29 July 2013, 22,854 leaflets have been distributed to voluntary and community sector organisations, as well as police forces, health centres and local authorities. The statement is produced in English and in 10 other languages.

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA319

The Home Office has not sent the leaflet to other countries. A full evaluation of the impact and success of the statement will be undertaken after the pilot has finished in November 2013.

Finance: Credit Cards

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

To ask Her Majesty’s Government , further to the Written Answer by Viscount Younger of Leckie on 17 July (WA 128–9), which regulator has the power to examine and review the interest rates charged by credit card issuers to consumers; how many companies offer that facility in the United Kingdom; whether they have plans to inquire into the rates currently charged; and what are the main barriers discovered by the Office of Fair Trading to new entrants in its review of such credit payment schemes.[HL1858]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Viscount Younger of Leckie): The Office of Fair Trading (OFT), the current regulator responsible for consumer credit regulation, including the regulation of credit card issuers, has no current plans to examine the rates charged by credit card issuers. When regulation of consumer credit transfers to the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) from April 2014, it will consider which areas of the consumer credit market to prioritise.

We are not aware of any data on the number of companies that issue credit cards. However, 2011 data from Mintel/Ipsos Mori tells us that 1 I card issuers accounted for over 80% of the consumer lending in this market. The largest issuer was Barclaycard with 19% of the market, followed by Lloyds TSB with 11% and Nat west with 10%.

The OFT has not examined barriers to entry specifically in relation to credit card providers; but it has considered retail banking in general, including high street banks, which provide current accounts as well as credit cards, and Small and Medium-Sized enterprises (SME) banking. The following link provides further details

www.oft.gov.uk/OFTwork/markets-work/othermarketswork/review-barriers/#named3

Food: Food Banks

Question

Asked by Lord Ouseley

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the cause of increased numbers of people using charitable food banks.[HL1741]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Communities and Local Government (Baroness Hanham): There are no official figures for the number of people, or reason for them using, food banks. The greatest proportion of such provision is community-led responding to local needs. As such, the Government do not believe

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA320

it is possible to keep a record of the number of food banks without placing unnecessary burdens on volunteers trying to help their communities.

Government: Deregulation

Question

Asked by Lord Rooker

To ask Her Majesty’s Government which Ministers have specific deregulation policy responsibilities; and what is the mechanism by which those responsibilities are co-ordinated within government. [HL1740]

Lord Newby: A list of Ministers responsible for Better Regulation functions (including deregulation) within their departments is provided below:

Better Regulation Ministers

The Rt Hon Oliver Letwin MP, Minister of State for Government Policy, cross-government responsibility

The Rt Hon Michael Fallon MP, Minister of State for Business and Enterprise, cross-government responsibility

Nick Hurd MP, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Charities, Social Enterprise and Volunteering, Cabinet Office

Jo Swinson MP, Minister for Employment Relations, Consumer and Postal Affairs, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills

Nicholas Boles MP, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Communities and Local Government

The Rt Hon Hugh Robertson MP, Minister of State, Department for Culture, Media and Sport

Elizabeth Truss MP, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Children and Families, Department for Education

David Heath MP, Minister of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Stephen Hammond MP, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Transport, Department for Transport

Steve Webb MP, Minister for Pensions, Department for Work and Pensions

Anna Soubry MP, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health, Department of Health

Lord Deighton, Commercial Secretary to the Treasury, HM Treasury

Lord Taylor of Holbeach, Lords Minister and Minister for Criminal Information, Home Office

Helen Grant MP, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Justice, Ministry of Justice

Deregulation responsibilities across government are co-ordinated by the Better Regulation Executive within the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills and by the Reducing Regulation Cabinet Sub-Committee (RRC), whose membership can be found at: www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_ data/file/83739/Cabinet_Committee_Membership_ Lists_Oct-2012.pdf

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA321

HALO Trust

Question

Asked by Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they intend to renew the contract for the HALO Trust to continue its mine-clearance work in Sri Lanka when the present funding ends.[HL2027]

Lord Newby: The UK Government’s current programme of mine clearance with the HALO Trust in Sri Lanka, part of a broader global programme, finishes in November 2013. Any new contract for mine clearance in Sri Lanka will be awarded through a competitive tender process.

Health: Cancer

Question

Asked by Baroness Masham of Ilton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they are taking to ensure that patients with breast cancer have access to technology that can accurately assess their need for chemotherapy.[HL1881]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is consulting on draft diagnostic guidance on tests to assess the suitability of chemotherapy in certain breast cancer patients. It is anticipated that the final guidance, Gene expression profiling and expanded immunohistochemistry tests to guide the use of adjuvant chemotherapy in early breast cancer management: MammaPrint, Oncotype DX, IHC4 and Mammostrat will be published in September 2013. The draft guidance can be found on the NICE website, www.nice.org.uk, by typing “gene expression profiling” into the search bar.

Health: Doctors

Question

Asked by Baroness Masham of Ilton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Earl Howe on 8 July (WA 11), whether they have any plans to collect centrally the number of vacancies for doctors in departments of emergency medicine.[HL2036]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The department has no plans to collect centrally the number of vacancies for doctors in departments of emergency medicine.

Health: Genomic Medicine

Question

Asked by Baroness Masham of Ilton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they are taking to encourage the adoption of genomic technology in the National Health Service.[HL1882]

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA322

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The United Kingdom has always had an enviable worldwide reputation for pioneering genetic research and has taken part in a wide range of related initiatives. Following the 2009 report of the House of Lords Science and Technology Committee inquiry on Genomic Medicine and its recommendations on genomic innovation, the Human Genomics Strategy Group (HGSG) was established in 2010, and delivered its report in January 2012.

In December 2012, the Prime Minister announced a project to sequence the whole genomes of up to 100,000 people over the next five years.

Genomics England Ltd has been established to run the project. Owned entirely by the Department, it will manage contracts for specialist UK-based companies, universities and hospitals for sequencing, data linkage and analysis, and set standards for patient consent. Based on expert scientific advice, it will start by tackling cancer, rare diseases and infectious diseases.

The UK aims to be the first country in the world to introduce whole genome sequencing into the mainstream health system.

Health: Human Papilloma Virus

Question

Asked by The Countess of Mar

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Earl Howe on 25 June (WA 112), whether there is any evidence that some school nurses are not forwarding promptly details of human papillomavirus vaccinations given to girls at school to the girls’ general practitioners; and what measures they will take to ensure that all documentation is provided within a week of administration of the vaccine.[HL1927]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The information requested is not routinely collected. However, we do not have any reason to doubt that school nurses are forwarding promptly details of human Papilloma virus vaccination given to girls at school to the girls' general practitioners. Measures taken to ensure that all documentation is provided within reasonable time of administration of the vaccine have already been provided to the noble Countess on 12 June, Official Report, column WA112.

Health: Private Hospitals

Question

Asked by Lord Hunt of Kings Heath

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what activities a private hospital must undertake in order to be eligible for charitable status; and whether all private hospitals that have been awarded charitable status meet those criteria every year.[HL2098]

Lord Newby: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the Charity Commission. I have asked the commission’s chief executive to reply.

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA323

Health: Weekend Services

Questions

Asked by Lord Mawhinney

To ask Her Majesty’s Government (1) how many, and (2) what proportion of, NHS hospitals provide the same services to their patients on Saturdays and Sundays as they provide from Mondays to Fridays. [HL1892]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government (1) how many, and (2) what proportion of, general practitioner surgeries provide the same services to their patients on Saturdays and Sundays as they provide from Mondays to Fridays.[HL1893]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): This information is not collected centrally.

The NHS Services, Seven Days a Week Forum, set up by NHS England, is currently undertaking a one-off survey of National Health Service trusts in England to establish the baseline position in respect of their weekend service offer. This will be used, together with data collected by the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges from Royal Colleges, Specialist Societies and individual consultants, to begin to quantify the current gap in weekend provision.

There are currently no plans to collect general practitioner data.

Higher Education: Staff

Question

Asked by Baroness Quin

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many employees in further education establishments and colleges who are now classified as private sector employees were previously classified as public sector employees.[HL1943]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Viscount Younger of Leckie): The total estimated number of staff working in further education and sixth-form colleges, who were reclassified from public sector employees to private sector employees, in 2012 was 196,000.

[Source:http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/pse/public-scctor-employment/q3-2012/stb-pse-2012q3.html]

Housing

Questions

Asked by Lord Storey

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how much discretionary housing payment funding was (1) allocated to, (2) unused by, and (3) returned to Her Majesty’s Government by, Liverpool City Council in each year to date, since its introduction.[HL1853]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Work and Pensions (Lord Freud): The table below shows how much Government contribution towards

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA324

Discretionary Housing Payments was made available to Liverpool City Council in each year since the scheme began, and how much of this went unused.

YearGovernment contribution towards DHPs made availableAmount of Government Contribution not used

2001/02

£245,978

2148,704

2002/03

£303,918

£178,466

2003/04

£303,918

£207,371

2004/05

£275,803

£168,450

2005/06

£241,501

£72,255

2006/07

£217,408

£10,957

2007/08

£219,542

£9,117

2008/09

£215,034

£2,325

2009/10

£212,182

£18,143

2010/11

£208,391

£29,268

2011/12

£295,730

£136,7451

2012/13

£892,5532

£337,435

2013/14

£1,606,233

N/A

The Government's contribution towards Discretionary Housing Payments is made in instalments, based upon estimates made by the local authorities. Any balancing payments are reconciled after the year has ended.

Therefore, any element of unused contribution would either not have been paid to Liverpool City Council, or would have been recovered. With the exception of 2011/12 where authorities could choose to carry forward unused funding into 2012/13, effectively unused funding and returned by Her Majesty's Government are the same.

1This is the only year when authorities have been able to carry forward any unused Government Contribution towards Discretionary Housing Payments into the next financial year.

2This includes the £136.745 unused funding from 2011/12 which Liverpool City Council requested to carry forward into 2012/13.

Asked by Lord Myners

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what plans they have to ensure that the Help to Buy scheme results in the construction of new homes.[HL1955]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Deighton): Reduced mortgage availability has been a major constraint to new supply as builders have had a reduced pool of buyers for new homes. In supporting a reduction in deposit requirements, the Help to Buy: mortgage guarantee scheme will ensure that there are a greater number of creditworthy borrowers able to buy new property.

The Help to Buy: equity loan scheme is only available on new build homes. The scheme was launched on 1 April and has already supported nearly 7,000 reservations of new build homes in its first three months.

Asked by Lord Myners

To ask Her Majesty’s Government when they will announce the pricing of the guarantee to be provided to lenders supporting the Help to Buy

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA325

scheme; and whether they intend to publish the risk pricing methodology to ensure that HM Treasury will incur no net loss from the scheme.[HL1973]

Lord Deighton: The Government will require lenders to pay a commercial fee for each mortgage in the scheme. This fee will be set so that the scheme is self-financing and will be set in line with the European Commission's guidance on setting fees for guarantees. To that end, lenders will pay a fee which compensates the Government for the expected losses under the scheme, the cost of capital of providing the guarantee and the administrative costs of the scheme.

The fee amount will be calculated following modelling of expected losses and will be subject to regular review so that it accurately reflects any changes to the expected losses, cost of capital or administrative costs of the scheme.

Further details of the scheme will be published in due course.

Immigration: Infectious Diseases

Questions

Asked by Lord Maginnis of Drumglass

To ask Her Majesty’s Government , further to the answers by Earl Howe on 24 April 2013 (HL Deb, col. 1402–3), what new measures are to be implemented, and when, in order to prevent immigrants bringing infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, including drug-resistant tuberculosis, into the United Kingdom from high-incidence countries like Romania. [HL1906]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what new or modified measures are being implemented, where there is an agreed intergovernmental procedure, in order to require immigrants either to submit a valid certificate of health from their country of origin or to undergo an immediate health examination on arrival in the United Kingdom.[HL1907]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): There are no new or modified measures to require immigrants to submit a valid certificate of health from their country of origin or to undergo an immediate health examination on arrival in the United Kingdom, apart from the arrangements for screening migrants from high incidence countries for active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) announced on 21 May 2012 by, former Minister of State for Immigration (Damian Green) as follows:

www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/sitecontent/documents/news/wms-tb.pdf

The new arrangements mean that all entrants from high TB incidence countries applying for visas over six months will be required to submit for pulmonary TB screening prior to and be certified as free of TB before they can be issued a visa. This system is currently being rolled out and it is anticipated that on completion the current system of on-entry screening for TB will

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA326

cease. Countries like Romania, as European Union countries, do not fall within the remit of the pre-entry TB screening programme.

In addition to this there is a longstanding provision in the Immigration Act which allows for the medical inspection of an arriving passenger should the admitting immigration officer deem it appropriate.

The Department will continue to provide policy leadership and support Public Health England in ensuring co-ordination of international and domestic approaches to TB.

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidance published in 2011, includes section 1.8.7 on screening new entrants and identifies key points in a new arrival's entry to the UK where the need for TB screening should be identified from the following information:

Port of Arrival reports;

new registrations with primary care;

entry to education (including universities); and

links with statutory and voluntary groups working with new entrants.

The guidance also recommends that any healthcare professional working with new entrants should encourage them to register with a General Practitioner, and we are also funding TB Alert, to raise public and professional awareness of TB.

Iraq: Chilcot Inquiry

Question

Asked by Lord Eames

To ask Her Majesty’s Government when they expect to publish the Chilcot report on the United Kingdom involvement in the Iraq war.[HL1603]

Lord Wallace of Saltaire: The Inquiry expects to be able to submit its report to the Prime Minister once the “Maxwellisation” process (by which individuals subject to criticism in the Inquiry's report are informed of the Inquiry's views and offered the opportunity to make representations to the Inquiry) is complete. In his letter to the Prime Minister on 15 July, Sir John Chilcot said that the Inquiry intends to inform relevant individuals at the end of this month that the Inquiry is likely to criticise them, and will send a second letter setting out provisional criticisms at the end of October. Sir John’s letter is published on the Iraq Inquiry website.

Migration and Immigration

Question

Asked by Lord Roberts of Llandudno

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, in the light of the recent Fiscal Sustainability Report from the Office for Budget Responsibility, what assessment have they made of the conclusions that (1) overall migration has a positive impact on the sustainability of the public finances over a 50-year timespan, (2) immigrants have a positive impact on productivity

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA327

and gross domestic product, and (3) immigration has a positive effect on the public sector’s debt dynamics.[HL1912]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Deighton): In its 2013 Fiscal sustainability report (FSR), the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) reviewed the literature on the impact of migration on the labour market and productivity, concluding that "we have not found definitive evidence on the impact of immigrants on productivity and GDP."1

The FSR also shows the mechanical impact on long-term projections of different demographic assumptions. The OBR stresses that these results "should be interpreted as broad-brush illustrations, not detailed forecasts."2 Furthermore, they are not a full assessment of the costs and benefits of a particular immigration policy.

1 Office for Budget Responsibility. Fiscal sustainability report, July 2013, paragraph A.45. p.148

2 Office for Budget Responsibility. Fiscal sustainability report, July 2013, paragraph A.43. p.148

NHS: Private Sector Providers

Question

Asked by Lord Turnberg

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what proportion of contracts for NHS services have been made with private sector providers since regulations under Section 75 of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 came into force.[HL1996]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): NHS England does not hold a central record of contracts that have been awarded to private sector organisations.

Pensions

Question

Asked by Lord Christopher

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their assessment of zero pay rate employment in general and of its impact on the potential future pension contributions for future generations.[HL2108]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Work and Pensions (Lord Freud): People are treated as having paid National Insurance (NI) contributions on weekly earnings of £109 or above and start paying NI contributions when their weekly earnings reach £149.

Those taking part in government employment programmes, such as Work Experience, remain on JSA while on short-term placements with employers and will continue to be credited with NI contributions, which provide entitlement to the basic state pension.

In a small number of cases people may be working but not receiving any pay. This includes unpaid family workers—comprising less than half of 1% of all people in work—and those on unpaid internships. These kinds

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA328

of opportunities help people gain experience in the labour market and so will not necessarily have an appreciable impact on longer-term pension prospects.

Personal Independence Payment

Questions

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what evidence was used by the Department for Work and Pensions to support the use of 20 metres as the distance to be used to assess whether people qualify for the enhanced rate of the mobility component of the Personal Independence Payment; and what evidence they used to support the use of the measure of 20 metres as a point at which disabled people face significantly higher costs than those who can walk up to 50 metres. [HL2077]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment the Department for Work and Pensions undertook to assess the additional costs and barriers faced by disabled people when setting the mobility criteria for the Personal Independence Payment; and how quality of life and wellbeing were taken into account when setting the mobility criteria for the Personal Independence Payment.[HL2078]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Work and Pensions (Lord Freud): In designing the assessment for Personal Independence Payment, the department considered the existing evidence relating to the extra costs faced by disabled people. This includes the following items of independent research:

Review of existing research on the extra costs of disability, 2005, DWP Working Paper 21 (http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20120411063028/http://research.dwp.clov.uk/asd/asd5/WP21.pdf)

Review of international evidence on the cost of disability, 2008, DWP research report 542 (http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20120411063028/http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd5/rports2009-2010/rrep542.pdf)

The impact of Disability Living Allowance and Attendance Allowance: Findings from exploratory qualitative research, 2010, DWP research report 649 (https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/ system/uploads/attachment_data/file/138984/rrep649.pdf.pdf)

These were referred to in the 2010 Disability Living Allowance reform consultation and in the May 2011 technical note supporting the initial draft of the assessment regulations.

In developing the PIP assessment, we considered various options for determining entitlement, including whether it would be feasible to assess the actual extra costs incurred by individuals as a result of their health condition or impairment. However, we did not believe this to be a practical approach, as the very wide range of factors affecting costs could have led to the assessment being subjective and inconsistent. Instead we chose to look at individuals’ ability to participate in society as a

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA329

proxy for their overall levels of need. Individuals’ levels of participation in society are assessed by looking at their ability to carry out a series of key everyday activities and the barriers they face in doing so. We believe that this is a fair and effective method of determining entitlement to the benefit, enabling us to target PIP on those who face the greatest barriers to living an independent life.

This approach was set out in the May 2011 document “Personal Independence Payment: initial draft of the assessment criteria”; the November 2011 document “Personal Independence Payment: second draft of the assessment criteria”; and the December 2012 document “The Government’s response to the consultation on the Personal Independence Payment assessment criteria and regulations”.

In line with this principle, the “moving around” aspect of the PIP assessment was designed to assess the key barriers individuals face to mobility. Our intention has always been to focus the enhanced rate on those with the greatest barriers to mobility. Paragraphs 2.3 and 2.4 of the June 2013 “Consultation on the PIP assessment ‘moving around’ activity” set out the department’s rationale for setting the benchmark of 20 metres.

We also considered all the evidence we received in response the consultations that we have carried out on PIP. In particular, consultation responses contained valuable insight into the impact of limited mobility on individuals’ quality of life and wellbeing.

The consultation on the “moving around” activity in the PIP assessment is still ongoing and closes on 5 August 2013. We will carefully consider all responses received before taking any decisions on whether to make changes to the assessment criteria.

Asked by Baroness Gardner of Parkes

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, in the light of the responses to their consultation on the Personal Independence Payment assessment for “moving around” activity, whether they will consider changing the 20 metre motability criterion to 50 metres. [HL2088]

Lord Freud: The consultation on the “moving around” activity in the PIP assessment was launched on 24 June 2013 and ends on 5 August 2013. We will carefully consider all responses received before taking any decisions on whether to make changes to the assessment criteria. A copy of the consultation document can be found at: www.gov.uk/govemment/consultations/consultation-on-the-pip-assessment-movingaround-activity.

Planning

Question

Asked by Lord Bradshaw

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Hanham on 22 July (WA 171), whether the Community Infrastructure Levy and section 106 agreements only apply to new developments; and how any rise in the value of

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA330

existing developments, where their value is increased by new infrastructure development, is captured for the public purse.[HL1918]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Communities and Local Government (Baroness Hanham): The Community Infrastructure Levy and section 106 agreements are only required as a consequence of new development: their purpose is to secure contributions which the local authorities consider necessary to mitigate the impact of new development.

Any increases in the value of existing development can only be realised when that development is let or sold, when the lessor or vendor is the principal recipient of the benefit. Mechanisms such as stamp duty capture some of this gain for the public purse but are not specific to particular areas or communities.

Infrastructure improvements may also affect the Rateable Values of hereditaments, thereby (over time) feeding through to business rate revenues, and then on to local authorities under the local retention of business rates.

Councils also have powers to levy a supplementary business rate, subject to support from local firms. In London, a business rate supplement is helping towards the financing of Crossrail, reflecting the broader value that Crossrail will in due course provide to London businesses.

Population: Statistics

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what revisions in the number of people coming to and leaving the United Kingdom for the 10 years up to 2011 have been made by the Office for National Statistics; and for what reason.[HL2070]

Lord Newby: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Prisoners: Hepatitis

Questions

Asked by Baroness Masham of Ilton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many prisoners in England received a hepatitis C test in (1) 2008, (2) 2009, (3) 2010, (4) 2011, and (5) 2012. [HL1936]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what percentage of prisoners in England received a hepatitis C test in (1) 2008, (2) 2009, (3) 2010, (4) 2011, and (5) 2012. [HL1937]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many prisoners in England received a hepatitis B test in (1) 2008, (2) 2009, (3) 2010, (4) 2011, and (5) 2012. [HL1938]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what percentage of prisoners in England received a hepatitis B test in (1) 2008, (2) 2009, (3) 2010, (4) 2011, and (5) 2012. [HL1939]

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA331

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many prisoners in England received a full course of the hepatitis B vaccine in (1) 2008, (2) 2009, (3) 2010, (4) 2011, and (5) 2012.[HL1940]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what percentage of prisoners in England received a full course of the hepatitis B vaccine in (1) 2008, (2) 2009, (3) 2010, (4) 2011, and (5) 2012.[HL1941]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): Data on hepatitis B and C

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA332

prevalence in prisons is collected centrally by Public Health England (PHE). PHE collects data from a number of sources. The Prison Health Performance Quality Indicators (PHPQI) record data on the number of prisoners who are tested for hepatitis C and the number of prisoners who were vaccinated against hepatitis B, either before or within one month of reception into prison. This data is shown in the following table.

Incomplete reporting means that these data probably under-represent the total number of prisoners receiving a test or a full course of vaccine. Data on hepatitis B testing is not collected centrally.

PHPQI: number of hepatitis C tests in prisons in England 2008-2012; combined male
20082009201020112012

Number of prisoners in England receiving a hepatitis C test

Not available

Not available

13,306

11,002

12,322

Percentage of prisoners in England receiving a hepatitis C test

Not available

Not available

5%

5.8%

6.2%

Number of prisoners in England receiving a full course of hepatitis B vaccine

66,759

60,869

143,774

107,282

111,497

Percentage of prisoners in England receiving a full course of hepatitis B vaccine

37%

40%

57%

57°/o

57%

Source: Prison Health Performance Quality Indicators/Public Health England

Prisoners: Learning Disabilities

Questions

Asked by Lord Bradley

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they are taking to ensure that comprehensive screening is in place to identify prisoners with learning disabilities.[HL1651]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they are taking to ensure that reasonable adjustments are made for all prisoners with learning disabilities. [HL1652]

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord McNally): Prison Service Instruction 32/2011 Ensuring Equality includes mandatory instructions to Governors to ensure that efforts are made to identify whether a prisoner has a mental or physical impairment of any form. It notes that not all prisoners will be aware of their disabled status and states that staff must be proactive in identifying the specific needs of all prisoners, providing further guidance on learning disabilities in an annex. It goes on to mandate reasonable adjustments for prisoners. Prison Service Instruction 75/2011 Reasonable Adjustments makes clear that it is the responsibility of residential staff to identify prisoners with any particular needs and make reasonable adjustments, consulting relevant specialist staff where necessary.

It is acknowledged that there arc improvements to be made in this area in prison establishments, and this is recognised in one of the NOMS equalities objectives 2012-16, which is to introduce a comprehensive learning disabilities screening process for offenders and to make reasonable adjustments for offenders with learning disabilities. NOMS is taking forward a programme of work in support of this objective, and is currently undertaking an assessment of the effectiveness of the various screening tools that are available in order to inform good practice across the estate.

Public Bodies

Questions

Asked by Baroness Armstrong of Hill Top

To ask Her Majesty’s Government to which public bodies the Department for Culture, Media and Sport has appointed a chairperson since May 2010; and who was appointed in each case.[HL1769]

Lord Newby: The following list comprises of all Chair appointments to DCMS public bodies, which are regulated by the Commissioner for Public Appointments:

Appointments made between

01/05/10 to 3/03/11

British Library Board

The Rt Hon. the Baroness Blackstone

National Museum of Science and Industry

Dr Douglas Gurr

Visit Britain

Christopher Rodrigues

01/04/11 to 31/03/12

BBC Trust

The Rt Hon. the Lord Patten of Barnes CH

Football Licensing Authority*

Paul Darling QC

Gambling Commission

Philip Graf

National Gallery

Mark Getty

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA333

National Heritage Memorial Fund (Heritage Lottery Fund)

Dame Jenny Abramsky

Public Lending Right Registrar

Sir James Parker

Royal Armouries Museum

Ann Green

Royal Armouries Museum

Wesley Paul

S4C

Huw Jones

Tate

Lord Browne of Madingley

The Reviewing Committee on the Export of Works of Art and Objects of Cultural Interest

Lord Inglewood

The Theatres Trust

Rob Dickens

Treasury Valuation Committee

Professor Cohn Renfrew

Victoria and Albert Museum

Sir Paul Ruddock

Wallace Collection

Sir John Ritblat

01/04/12 - 31/03/13

Arts Council England

Sir Peter Bazalgette

Historic Royal Palaces

Charles Mackay

Horniman Museum

Timothy Hornsbv

National Museums Liverpool

Professor Philip Redmond

UK Anti-Doping

David Kenworthy

01/04/13 - 22/07/13

Advisory Committee on the Government Art Collection*

David Verey°

Horserace Betting Levy Board

Paul Lee

Sport England

Nick Bitel

UK Sport

Rod Carr

*not regulated by the Commissioner for Public Appointments.

Asked by Baroness Armstrong of Hill Top

To ask Her Majesty’s Government to which public bodies the Department for Education has appointed a chairperson since May 2010; and who was appointed in each case.[HL1796]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Nash): Since May 2010, the following individuals have been appointed chairpersons to public bodies falling under the remit of the Department for Education:

Public bodyChairpersonDate of appointment

Ofsted

Baroness Sally Morgan

1 March 2011

Ofqual

Ms Amanda Spielman

14 July 2011

Children and Families Court Advisory Service (CAFCASS)

Baroness Tyler of Enfield

23 January 2012

School Teachers Review Body (STRB)

Dame Patricia Hodgson

1 February 2012

Social Mobility Child Poverty Commission (SMCPC)

Mr Alan Milburn

14 July 2012

Information Standards Board (ISB)

Mr Deep Sager

18 February 2013

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA334

Railways: IC125 and IC225

Question

Asked by Lord Greaves

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what are their plans for the future of the IC125 and IC225 fleets currently working on the Great Western and East Coast main lines following their replacement by the new class 800 Intercity Express Passenger trains. [HL2122]

Lord Newby: The use of 1C125 and IC225 fleets following the deployment of class 800 series trains will be for the relevant asset owners and potential future operators to determine.

Royal Navy: Ships

Question

Asked by Lord West of Spithead

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what Royal Navy ships have been decommissioned since July 2010.[HL1935]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence (Lord Astor of Hever): I refer the noble Lord to the Answer that my honourable friend the Minister for Defence Equipment, Support and Technology (Philip Dunne) gave in the other place on 25 April 2013 (Official Report, col. 1271W). Since then HMS “Edinburgh” has been decommissioned as the new Type 45 Destroyers continue to progress.

Schools: Careers Advice

Question

Asked by The Earl of Courtown

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many schools offer careers advice to students.[HL1719]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Nash): Maintained schools in England have a statutory responsibility to secure independent and impartial careers guidance.

All academies opened from September 2012 are required by their funding agreements to secure independent and impartial careers guidance, in line with the duties on maintained schools.

Schools: Funding

Question

Asked by Lord Bassam of Brighton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they have received any requests from East Sussex County Council for additional funding in order to carry out school improvement works; and, in particular, whether any such request has related to funding for a new school hall for St Michael’s Primary School in Playden.[HL1950]

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The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Nash): East Sussex County Council made four applications to the Education Funding Agency for additional capital funding for school works. These were all made through the Targeted Basic Need Programme. Three applications were for new schools and the fourth was for an expansion at Robsack Wood Community Primary School. The local authority was successful in one of their bids for a new school.

No applications have been made by East Sussex County Council with regards to St Michael's Primary School in Playden.

Schools: National Curriculum

Questions

Asked by Lord Crisp

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether study of Florence Nightingale’s life and work will remain part of the national curriculum.[HL1872]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Nash): Florence Nightingale is not mentioned specifically in the proposed national curriculum programmes of study that we published on 8 July 2013. Teachers will, however, be free to teach about her life and work. Under the current national curriculum, Florence Nightingale is mentioned in the history programme of study for key stage 2 as an example of a topic that might be covered as part of an optional unit on Victorian Britain, but teaching about her is not compulsory.

The new national curriculum will help to ensure that school pupils are taught essential knowledge about the events and processes that have helped to shape British and world history. However, we also want to give teachers the flexibility to use their professional judgement to design lessons that stimulate and enthuse their pupils. For that reason, and having considered carefully the responses received to the public consultation on the proposals that we published earlier this year, we have reduced the level of prescription in the proposed programmes of study for history. As part of this, we have kept the number of significant historical individuals named to a minimum.

Asked by Lord Crisp

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what criteria will be used to determine which historical figures will be named in the national curriculum and associated guidance to schools.[HL1873]

Lord Nash: In designing the new national curriculum for history we have listened to the views of historians, academics, teachers and a range of other interested parties. Following feedback from the consultation we conducted between February and April this year, we have kept the number of historical figures named to a minimum to avoid imposing unnecessary central prescription on teachers. As with other aspects of the draft curriculum, we have made a judgement about

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where it is appropriate for historical figures to be named based on consultation with subject experts. For example in key stage 1 we have given non-statutory examples to help teachers introduce pupils to history by looking at different periods through the prism of the lives of significant individuals.

The Government does not plan to produce central guidance for schools about how the new curriculum should be taught. It will be a matter for individual schools to decide which historical figures to teach about, beyond the requirements of the statutory programmes of study.

Schools: Temperature Regulation

Question

Asked by Lord Storey

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they intend to introduce maximum and minimum temperatures in all schools.[HL1851]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Nash): The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992, which cover most spaces in schools, require that the temperature in all workplaces inside buildings is reasonable during working hours. While the Approved Code of Practice, which accompanies these regulations, does say that the temperature in workrooms should normally be at least 16 degrees Celsius, it does not indicate what a maximum temperature should be.

There are no plans to introduce a maximum temperature in schools.

Schools: Ventilation

Question

Asked by Lord Storey

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Department of Education’s Building Bulletin 101: Ventilation of School Buildings, how many schools have been deemed inadequately ventilated in (1) Liverpool, (2) Merseyside, (3) the North West of England and (4) the United Kingdom.[HL1852]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Nash): The Department for Education does not collect this information and, so far as we are aware, this information is not collected in a systematic way by any other organisation.

Succession to the Crown Bill

Question

Asked by Lord Cormack

To ask Her Majesty’s Government , further to the undertaking by Lord Wallace of Tankerness on 14 February (HL Deb, col 832), what was the outcome of their discussion with the Roman Catholic Church on mixed marriages.[HL1800]

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The Advocate-General for Scotland (Lord Wallace of Tankerness): This issue was discussed at length during the Succession to the Crown Act’s Report stage debate on 13 March, where there were a number of considered interventions. I stated both in that debate and during the course of the Third Reading debate, on 22 April 2013 (WA 1221), that I had met Monsignor Stock on behalf of Archbishop Nichols and the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of England and Wales to discuss this matter. Monsignor Stock was clear that he was speaking on behalf of Archbishop Nichols as president of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of England and Wales in setting out the following view:

“In the instance of mixed marriages the approach of the Catholic Church is pastoral. It will always look to provide guidance that supports and strengthens the unity and indissolubility of the marriage. In this context the Catholic Church expects Catholic spouses to sincerely undertake to do all that they can to raise children in the Catholic Church. Where it has not been possible for the child of a mixed marriage to be brought up as a Catholic, the Catholic parent does not fall subject to the censure of canon law.”

Sudan

Question

Asked by The Earl of Sandwich

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of reports that conditions in the camps for displaced people in Darfur have recently deteriorated, partly because of the threat to the work of non-governmental organisations.[HL1782]

Lord Newby: The increase in fighting in Darfur this year has led to more people leaving their homes and moving into camps for displaced people. The recent insecurity in South Darfur and attacks on the offices of non-governmental organisations meant that support to internally displaced people camps was stopped for a few days. However these organisations have now begun to resume operations. The United Nations Secretary General reported this week that aid was continuing to be provided to the 1.4 million people living in camps for displaced people. The UK remains concerned about the effect of insecurity on the ability of non-governmental organisations to deliver support and continues to remind the Government of Sudan of its obligation to protect civilians.

Suicide

Question

Asked by Baroness Finlay of Llandaff

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they intend to put in place controls on the sale of suicide kits online, including on the promotion and sale of gases such as helium.[HL1706]

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord McNally): As part of the cross-government Suicide Prevention Strategy for England led by the Department of Health, the Government plans to explore potential options for action with industry representatives.

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Teachers: Professional Development

Question

Asked by Baroness Brinton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what proportion of continuing professional development provision for teachers in the United Kingdom is provided by higher education institutions.[HL2003]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Nash): Professional development for teachers includes a wide variety of activities and is supported and delivered by a range of providers, including schools and higher education institutions. Schools choose the professional development which they think best meets the individual needs of their teachers and pupils.

The department does not collect information on professional development for teachers in England provided by higher education institutions.

Matters relating to education outside England are devolved to the Scottish Government, the Northern Ireland Executive and the Welsh Government.

Teachers: Redundancy

Question

Asked by Lord Storey

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many (1) compulsory redundancies, (2) voluntary redundancies, and (3) compromise agreements, have been issued to teachers during the last three years.[HL1848]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Nash): The Department does not hold the requested information. The information is held by schools or local authorities.

Tobacco: Taxation

Question

Asked by Lord Moonie

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what was the total taxation arising from packaged cigarettes in the last financial year; and what estimate they have made of the percentage revenue they would lose if all cigarettes were to be sold in plain packaging. [HL1917]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Deighton): HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) publishes excise duty collected on cigarettes in the HMRC national statistics bulletin. The cigarettes duty revenue for 2012/13 was f 8,559 million. VAT collected on cigarettes is not available and, therefore, the total tax revenue collected from tobacco taxation cannot be established.

Alongside the Consultation on standardised packaging of tobacco products published in 2012, the Department of Health also published a consultation-stage impact assessment that provided a preliminary assessment of the costs and benefits that could arise from the introduction of standardised packaging requirements. Paragraph 52 of the impact assessment considers the cost to the Exchequer. An estimate of the percentage

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revenue lost is not available as “these estimates of lost receipts are indicative and do not allow for future changes in rates of duty, changes in market shares of different brands, changes in smoking patterns or purchasing habits.”

The relevant documents are available on the Department of Health’s website1

1http://consultations.dh.gov.uk/tobacco/standardised- packaging-of-tobacco-products

Answers received between Tuesday 6 August 2013and Monday 12 August 2013

Academy for Healthcare Science

Question

Asked by Baroness Masham of Ilton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how much funding they have provided to the Academy for Healthcare Science (AHCS) in each of the past two years; how much they will provide to the AHCS in each of the next three years; and for what purposes that funding has been provided.[HL2035]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): In each of the past two years, the Academy for Healthcare Science (AHCS) has received funding from the Department in the years 2011-12 and 2012-13 and Health Education England (HEE) in 2013-14 as follows:

- In 2011-12 it received £250,000;- In 2012-13 it received £450,000; and- In 2013-14 it has received £200,000.

Further funding is being discussed by FEE to support delivery of the operational programmes of work.

Future years' funding is the subject of on-going discussions.

The AHCS is funded to develop consistent regulation for the healthcare science workforce; implement a system to assess and confer 'equivalence' of the existing qualifications and experience individuals have; undertake quality assurance of education and training in partnership; and develop common standards for healthcare science practice.

Armed Forces: Northern Ireland Reserve Forces

Question

Asked by Lord Kilclooney

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how enrolment in the Territorial Army in recent months in Northern Ireland has compared with that in the other three nations in the United Kingdom; what proposals they have to increase the size of the reserve forces in Northern Ireland; where any new bases for reserve forces in Northern Ireland would be located; and which territorial army centres in Northern Ireland have been identified for closure.[HL1776]

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The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence (Lord Astor of Hever): Enrolment with the Territorial Army (TA) has always been proportionately strong in Northern Ireland, with the most recent assessment (for 2012-13) showing that around 7% of the total number of TA personnel were recruited in Northern Ireland.

Following my announcement on Army Reserve (Structure and Basing) on 3 July 2013, (Official Report, cols. 1215-1218) there will be no change to the overall number of Army Reserve units in Northern Ireland, which will remain as five, but sub-units will increase from 21 to 22.

In total, the Army Reserve will be located across 15 sites in Northern Ireland. While one site, the Depot Gardens TA Centre, Armagh, will be vacated by the Army Reserve, a new site will be opened at Kinnegar Barracks in Belfast.

The site at Armagh which is being vacated will be passed to the Defence Infrastructure Organisation to be considered for disposal. As part of this process they will establish whether there are any wider Defence uses for the site. Those Army Reserve units currently housed in the Armagh TA Centre are expected to move to Portadown at a distance of 11 miles from the current site.

Armed Forces: Royal Marine Reserves

Question

Asked by Lord Trefgarne

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is the present strength of the Royal Marines Reserve; and what is its role.[HL1903]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence (Lord Astor of Hever): At 1 June 2013 the Royal Marines Reserve strength was 650. The Royal Marines Reserve primarily provides individuals and small teams to fill specified roles in support of the United Kingdom's Amphibious Forces.

Benefits

Question

Asked by Baroness Brinton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many people with rheumatoid arthritis (1) appealed against a Department for Work and Pensions decision regarding the mobility component of Disability Living Allowance, and (2) successfully overturned a Department for Work and Pensions decision regarding the mobility component of Disability Living Allowance, in each of the last five years.[HL2001]

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord McNally): The First-tier Tribunal—Social Security and Child Support (SSCS)—administered by HM Courts & Tribunals Service, hears appeals against Department for Work and Pensions’ (DWP) decisions on an individual's entitlement to social security and child support.

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The Tribunal does not record an appellant's specific disability, only whether the appeal is against the mobility component of Disability Living Allowance (DLA), the care component, or both. Therefore it is not possible to provide data specifically on appellants with rheumatoid arthritis.

Bovine Tuberculosis

Question

Asked by Lord Maginnis of Drumglass

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by the Minister of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, David Heath, on 16 July (HC Deb, col 634–5W) stating the Advisory Committee on the Microbiological Safety of Food advice that the sale and consumption of meat from tuberculosis reactor cattle presents negligible risk, how they apply their duty of care in providing food to those compelled to accept it in hospitals, schools and the armed services; and what other similar and current practices exist relating to meals provision in those areas of responsibility.[HL1980]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The Food Standards Agency (FSA) considers that the risk to human health from bovine Tuberculosis (TB) through consumption of meat is very low and current evidence does not indicate a food safety issue. Bovine TB is not considered to be a meat-borne pathogen and meat from TB reactor cattle is as safe to eat as other meat. No specific additional food safety measures are therefore legally required or recommended by FSA in relation to providing this meat to hospitals, schools and the armed service over and above FSA's general advice for food businesses and consumers on the safe preparation and cooking of meat.

The body with responsibility for food procurement differs for schools, hospitals and the armed services. Public sector procurement practices, required standards and audit procedures vary depending on the body procuring the food. National Health Service and hospital food procurement is determined by the individual nations; in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland food procurement is coordinated through the individual nations central NHS Procurement teams; in England there is a NHS Supply Chain which has national contracts with approved hospital suppliers. Food procurement within local authority (LA) schools is, generally, the responsibility of the LA procurement team. The armed services have their own systems in place, run through the Ministry of Defence who monitor contracts ensuring both food safety and contractual obligations are met.

All food businesses, including hospitals, schools and manufacturers across the United Kingdom receive food hygiene inspections from the appropriate enforcement agency, whether the LA food safety team, or the FSA operations team in the case of meat approved establishments. Further to this public sector bodies may undertake their own audit procedures on suppliers or have in place independent third party auditors, if they feel this is required.

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Broadcasting: Public Service Terrestrial Broadcasting

Question

Asked by Lord Clement-Jones

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the value to the United Kingdom economy of free at the point of use public service terrestrial broadcasting.[HL1846]

Lord Wallace of Saltaire: The BBC, ITV, S4C and Channels 4 and 5 now invest over £3 billion a year in UK content. Investment by the public service broadcasters supports the wider creative industries. Deloitte estimates that the BBC alone generated £8 billion for the UK economy in the last year, equating to about two pounds being added to the UK economy for every pound of licence fee spent.

Burma

Questions

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assistance and treatment for cervical infections has been provided to ethnic Kachin women in Burma in camps for the internally displaced.[HL2020]

Lord Popat: The UK is one of the biggest bilateral donors in Kachin State. We have just announced new humanitarian funding there of £13.5 million for the next two and a half years. This will include provision of a range of basic health services with a focus on internally displaced people. For serious diseases and infections our partners provide support to help improve people's access to better healthcare facilities, which may include assistance for treatment of cervical infections.

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they have discussed with the government of Burma how much money that government has spent on support for (1) internally displaced people in Kachin State, and (2) internally displaced people in Rakhine state.[HL2022]

Lord Popat: The UK is in regular contact with the government of Burma at ministerial level regarding the situation of internally displaced people in Kachin and Rakhine states. Inter-communal violence, and the state of the peace process were discussed by UK Ministers, including the Prime Minister, with Burmese President Thein Sein during his recent visit to London. The Minister of State for International Development, Rt. Hon. Alan Duncan, visited Rakhine in June 2013 and discussed the need to provide equitable assistance to internally displaced people (IDPs) and improve access to essential services, with his Burmese government counterparts.