Prisoners: Children

Questions

Asked by Lord Wills

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what estimate they have made of the number of children in England and Wales who have one or two parents in prison. [HL2037]

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA377

Lord Popat: Information on the number of children with parents in prison is not routinely collected. However, it is estimated that 93,000 children had a parent in prison at the end of June 2009. Over the entire year (2009), it is estimated that 200,000 children experienced the imprisonment of at least one parent at some point. This estimate is based on the number of individuals in prison in 2009 and the average number of children (1.1 children each) reported by prisoners in a large representative survey (Surveying Prisoner Crime Reduction - SPCR - a survey of prisoners sentenced to between one month and four years in England and Wales in 2005 and 2006).

Asked by Lord Wills

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what estimate they have made of the number of prisoners in England and Wales who had one or two parents in prison.[HL2038]

Lord Popat: Prisoners are not routinely asked whether their parents were imprisoned. However, SPCR found that 37% of prisoners reported having family members who had been convicted of a non-motoring criminal offence, of whom 84% had been in prison, a young offenders' institution or borstal. Most of these convicted family members were male (in 56% of the cases that person was their brother or step-brother and 35% their father or step-father).

The full SPCR Children and Families report is available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/217401/prisoners-childhood-family-backgrounds.pdf.

Asked by Lord Wills

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what measures they are taking to support children in England and Wales who have one or two parents in prison. [HL2039]

Lord Popat: We know from the evidence that supporting prisoners’ children and families is important for two reasons: It can help reduce reoffending; and help reduce the likelihood of intergenerational offending by addressing the poor outcomes faced by children of offenders.

I have referred to the numbers of children affected by parental imprisonment in my preceding answer. Research tells us that children with parents in prison are more vulnerable than other children. They are more likely to become offenders themselves, to develop behavioural problems and poor psychological health than children who have not had a parent in prison and they may lose contact with their imprisoned mother or father.

The importance of supporting offenders' families is reflected both in strategic objectives and operational instructions: The National Offender Management Service (NOMS) Commissioning Intentions for 2013/14 set out the Agency's assessment of service need and demand and intended priorities for services, sets an expectation

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA378

on Prisons and Probation to maintain investment and work with Local Authority partners to support offenders families.

Prison Service Instructions on Rehabilitation outline expectations on Prisons to: help staff recognise the impact of imprisonment on prisoners’ families and to understand their role in the maintenance of family relationships and supporting offenders’ families; to provide advice, support, signposting and referral of prisoners to services; and to reflect the involvement of families in the Offender Management process.

Minimum standards on how Prisons support family visitors include: visiting times which maximise opportunities for prisoners and families to meet; ensuring opportunities for reasonable physical contact; facilities for children to play whilst visiting; decent, indoor facilities with toilets and baby changing facilities. NOMS encourages additional activities such as: enhanced children’s play facilities; family support worker services; family days and child centred visits; homework clubs: use of Release On Temporary Licence as part of the plans for resettlement renewing family ties; and delivery of relationship and parenting skills enhancement programmes.

Following a successful pilot, NOMS has let a national framework contract for family engagement workers. Prisons can call off a service tailored to local circumstances. NOMS is working with The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills to improve the commissioning of parenting and relationship skills programmes for offenders through better targeting of offender and family need and partnership approaches.

Delivery of services to the children and families of offenders must be considered in the context of the Government's wider approach to supporting families. Tackling Troubled Families is a priority for this Government and supporting offenders' families is an important aspect of this work. This involves taking a partnership approach to whole family support.

The Troubled Families Programme in England, the Welsh Government's Families First programme and their Integrated Family Support Service are important initiatives for NOMS. Many members of the families involved with these programmes will either be in the criminal justice system already or be at risk of entering the system. Intervening positively in the lives of these families has the potential to reduce the impact on demand for criminal justice services.

The MoJ has provided a substantial funding contribution to the Programme and has been closely involved with CLG and other Government departments in ongoing development of the rum me and ensuring that frontline justice sector workers are fully engaged, many of whom will already have considerable knowledge and experience of working with troubled families.

Officials in NOMS are working with the Department for Education to launch a new contracted online and telephone service in September. This will provide an innovative, national knowledge and advice centre to support commissioners of services and professionals working with families of offenders, including prisons, Probation Trusts, Youth Offending Teams, local authorities and voluntary organisations.

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA379

Finally, as part of Transforming Rehabilitation: A Strategy for Reform, we are putting in place an unprecedented nationwide 'through the prison gate' resettlement service, meaning most offenders are given continuous support by one provider from custody into the community. We will support this by ensuring that most offenders are held in a prison designated to their area for at least three months before release. This should provide both better opportunities to support contact with families and links with local partners and providers of support services. In custody, providers will offer a resettlement service for all offenders in custody before their release. This may include family support where it is needed.

Prisoners: Indeterminate Sentences for Public Protection

Questions

Asked by Lord Ramsbotham

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many people serving indeterminate sentences for public protection were approved for release on temporary licence in each of the past three years.[HL2112]

Lord Popat: The information requested is not available through central systems as the total number of releases on temporary licence granted can not be separated by offence type.

Asked by Lord Ramsbotham

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many people serving indeterminate sentences for public protection, by sentence type, have completed offending behaviour programmes, (1) pre-tariff, and (2) post-tariff, in each of the past three years.[HL2113]

Lord Popat: Table 1 shows the number of IPP prisoners who have completed at least one accredited offending behaviour programme by tariff status.

This information is provided as a snapshot at the end of the financial years of 2011/12 and 2012/13. The offender data used to identify accredited programme completions for prisoners serving indeterminate sentences for public protection is taken from previously published information on indeterminate sentence prisoners. As December 2011 was the first period in which this data was published, a snapshot of accredited programme completions for 2010/11 is not available.

Please note that non-accredited programme completions have not been included as the numbers of completions are not collected centrally. To provide additional context the table also shows the percentage of IPPs with an accredited programme completion at the end of each period.

Table 1: The number of IPP prisoners who have completed at least one accredited offending behaviour programme by tariff status
Q4 2011/12Q4 2012/13

Pre-Tariff

1,452

1,344

Post-Tariff

3,118

3,190

Unknown

1

2

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA380

Percentage of all IPPs with an Accredited Programme Completion

76.0%

78.1%

Asked by Lord Ramsbotham

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many people serving indeterminate sentences for public protection, by sentence type, have had their sentence plan reviewed following the issue of Prison Service Instruction Number 114/2012.[HL2114]

Lord Popat: No information is collected on the number of sentence plans involving offenders serving an indeterminate sentence of imprisonment for public protection (IPP) which have been reviewed following publication of Prison Service Instruction 41 of 2012: Sentence Planning. This information could be obtained only at disproportionate cost as individual prisons would need to be contacted and the sentence plan for each of the 5,620 IPP prisoners in custody (as of 30 June 2013) checked.

Prisoners: Meals

Question

Asked by Baroness Linklater of Butterstone

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many (1) young offenders, and (2) adult prisoners, have to eat their meals in their cells; and how many prisons currently have facilities to enable prisoners to dine out of their cell.HL2097]

Lord Popat: There are no centrally prescribed guidelines on where prisoners should he served their meal; security considerations, physical layout, regime and staffing resources dictate where a meal is served. This information varies considerably both within individual prisons and across the estate as a whole and would require enquiries to be made with every prison in England and Wales, incurring disproportionate cost in the process.

Prisoners: Suicide

Question

Asked by Lord Trefgarne

To ask Her Majesty’s Government , further to the answer by Lord McNally on 29 July, what were the ages of the six children who committed suicide in prison in 2011–12; and what is the minimum age at which children can be held in prison.[HL2034]

Lord Popat: Every death in prison is a tragedy and affects families, staff and other prisoners deeply. We are committed to learning from such events to reduce the number of self inflicted deaths in prison custody.

In 2011-2012 there were three apparently self-inflicted deaths by young people in custody. Two were 17 years old and one 15 years old.

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA381

Young people cannot be sentenced or remanded to a prison. Courts are able to pass a custodial sentence on any young person aged 12 or over, which will be served either in a Young Offender Institution, Secure Training Centre or Secure Children's Home. The Youth Justice Board has statutory responsibility for placing young people in custody and will make a placement decision on the basis of evidence received from Court, the local Youth Offending Team and other sources. Each case is considered on its individual merits.

Royal Navy: Ships

Question

Asked by Lord West of Spithead

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what ships have been ordered by the Royal Navy since July 2010.[HL1934]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence (Lord Astor of Hever): Three River Class Offshore Patrol Vessels have been purchased by the Royal Navy since July 2010. In addition, HMS Protector, the Royal Navy's Ice Patrol Ship, has been leased since 2011. The Ministry of Defence has also ordered four Maritime Afloat Reach and Sustainability Tankers, which will enter service with the Royal Fleet Auxiliary, and six Island Class Patrol Boats, for service with the Royal Marines and the MoD Police.

In addition, the defence equipment plan published earlier this year includes for the Royal Navy: six Type 45 Destroyers, of which five are already in-service; two Queen Elizabeth Class Aircraft Carriers, which are currently under construction; and the design and development of the new Type 26 Global Combat Ships.

I have interpreted ships to refer to the surface fleet, so my answer therefore does not include our submarine fleet.

Schools: Academies

Questions

Asked by Lord Grocott

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what proportion of academies are now deemed by Ofsted to be performing worse than before they were converted to that status.[HL1875]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what proportion of academies are now showing a higher Ofsted grading than before they were converted to that status.[HL1876]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Nash): There are now 3,086 open academies, the vast majority of which have opened since September 2010.

The figures below set out the proportion of mainstream academies opened since September 2010 which have improved or fallen by one or more Ofsted categories in comparison to the last inspection outcome as the predecessor school. It should be noted that changes to

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA382

school inspection in 2012 have resulted in a tougher framework with higher expectations of schools, particularly with regard to the quality of teaching and its impact on pupils’ learning.

43 per cent of academies inspected by Ofsted have been rated in a higher category than their predecessor school. This figure excludes schools previously rated ‘Outstanding’ that could not improve their rating any further.

24 per cent of academies inspected by Ofsted have been rated in a lower category than their predecessor school. This figure excludes schools previously rated ‘Inadequate’ that could not receive a lower Ofsted rating.

Schools: Free Meals

Question

Asked by Lord Storey

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many children with parents in receipt of support under section 4 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 are entitled to free school meals; and whether they will extend the entitlement among that group. [HL1850]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Nash): The children of asylum seekers are entitled to free school meals only if their parent is in receipt of support under Part 6 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999. The people entitled to support under section 4 include those who have applied for asylum and have had their application rejected. The children of such persons are not entitled to free school meals. The government has no plans to extend free school meal entitlement to the children of those in receipt of support under section 4.

Smoking

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what has been the percentage decline in cigarette sales since the introduction of the workplace smoking ban in 2007; whether there has been a proportionate change in smoking loose tobacco as opposed to pre-rolled cigarettes; and whether they have noted any improvements to health and mortality.[HL2119]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The Government does not hold tobacco sales data. Office of National Statistics data on quantities of cigarettes, cigars, hand-rolling tobacco and other types of tobacco such as pipe and chewing tobacco released for consumption can be found at:

www.uktradeinfo.com/Statistics/Tax%20and%20Duty%20Bulletins/Tobacco0113.xls#'6’!A1

Information on the type of cigarette smoked by adults, by gender and socio-economic classification in 2010 is available in Table 2.5 of the Statistics on Smoking - England, 2012. A copy has been placed in

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the Library. Information on the type of cigarette smoked by adults, by gender and socio-economic classification in 2006 is available in Table 2.5 of the

Statistics on Smoking, England, 2008

. A copy has already been placed in the Library.

An evidence review of the impact of the smoke-free legislation in England undertaken by the University of Bath was published alongside the Tobacco Control Plan for England in 2011.

Latest data on National Health Service hospital admissions due to smoking-related illnesses is available in Table 4.4 of the Statistics on Smoking - England, 2012. Equivalent information on admissions for 2006-07 is available in Table 5.2 of the Statistics on Smoking, England, 2008.

Latest data on the estimated number of deaths that can be attributed to smoking is available in Table 4.6 of the Statistics on Smoking - England, 2012. Equivalent information on deaths for 2007 is available in Table 5.4 of the Statistics on Smoking, England, 2008.

Television Licence Fee: Court Proceedings

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many people in 2012 were summoned to appear at magistrates' courts in England for failure to pay a television licence fee; how many were proceeded against at such courts; how many were found guilty of fee evasion; what percentage of magistrates' work is related to dealing with such crimes; what is the estimated annual cost of this court operation; and what proportion of those charged with licence fee evasion were women.[HL1726]

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord McNally): The number of persons proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts of installing or using a television receiver without the appropriate licence, in England, in 2012, can be viewed in the table, which also provides the proportion of which are female.

The Ministry of Justice does not collect data on the cost of proceedings for specific offences in magistrates' courts and therefore is not able to estimate the cost of proceedings for failure to pay a television licence fee in 2012 with sufficient reliability within the time and cost available.

Persons proceeded against magistrates' courts and found guilty at all courts of installing or using a television receiver without the appropriate licence (1), England, 2012 (2)(3)
2012

Proceeded against

181880

of which

male

59841

female

121602

not stated

437

Proportion female

67%

Found guilty

155135

of which

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA384

male

49477

female

105347

not stated

311

Proportion female

68%

(1) An offence under S363 of the Communications Act 2003

(2) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe

(3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice Ref. PQ HL 1726

Turkey

Questions

Asked by Lord Patten

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Warsi on 19 June (WA 59), whether they will now give their assessment of the number of journalists currently imprisoned in Turkey; and if not, why not.[HL1960]

The Senior Minister of State, Department for Communities and Local Government & Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Baroness Warsi): We do not have any reliable information on the precise number of journalists imprisoned in Turkey. Estimates of the actual numbers involved vary widely. The Turkish authorities are aware of our concerns, and we and our EU partners continue to raise freedom of expression and other fundamental freedoms as part of our wider dialogue with the Turkish government.

Asked by Lord Patten

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Warsi on 19 June (WA 58), what is their assessment of the effectiveness since October 2012 of the joint United Kingdom-Turkey training package aimed at training Turkish lawyers in fundamental rights.[HL1961]

Baroness Warsi: The Turkish Europe Ministry working with the Ministry of Justice has delivered six training sessions to improve awareness about the justice and fundamental rights chapter of the EU acquis. 431 Turkish lawyers have been trained. The project includes a study visit to the UK and a closing conference to take place in the autumn. We will be evaluating the impact of the project once it closes later this year.

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA385

Asked by Lord Patten

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Warsi on 19 June (WA 58-9), when the next senior ministerial visit to Turkey will take place, and whether they will raise the issue of fundamental human rights with the government of Turkey during that visit.[HL1962]

Baroness Warsi: It is long-standing policy not to confirm Ministerial travel plans in advance. However, human rights will continue to be an element of the Government's discussions with the Turkish leadership. The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my right hon. Friend the Member for Richmond (Yorks) (Mr Hague) and the Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my right hon. Friend the Member for Aylesbury (Mr Lidington) last spoke to their counterparts in Turkey about the recent protests in June. We, and our EU partners, will continue to raise human rights issues as part of our broader dialogue with Turkey and have made clear the importance we attach to their compliance with their commitments under the European Convention on Human Rights.

Visas

Question

Asked by The Earl of Clancarty

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many applicants to the Tier 1 (Exceptional Talent) visa route for each of the four designated competent bodies have been (1) assessed, and (2) endorsed, in each year from the inception of the scheme to the present.[HL1942]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): Since the inception of the Tier 1 (Exceptional Talent) visa route, to date the four designated competent bodies have received the following number of applications:

August 2011 to April 2012
Designated BodiesAssessedEndorsed

The Arts Council

38

12

The Royal Society

19

8

British Academy

13

5

The Royal Academy of Engineering

19

0

Total for period

89

25

April 2012 to March 2013
Designated BodiesAssessedEndorsed

The Arts Council

32

18

The Royal Society

25

17

British Academy

16

15

The Royal Academy of Engineering

17

8

Total for period

90

58

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA386

April 2013 – to date
Designated BodiesAssessedEndorsed

The Arts Council

4

3

The Royal Society

5

3

British Academy

9

9

The Royal Academy of Engineering

3

2

Total for period

21

17

War Memorials

Question

Asked by Lord West of Spithead

To ask Her Majesty’s Government which department is responsible for the Royal Naval Division memorial on Horse Guards Parade; and when water will be reconnected to the memorial.[HL1880]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence (Lord Astor of Hever): The Royal Navy Division Memorial Charity owns the memorial on Horse Guards Parade. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office is responsible for the water supply, which is connected and functioning as designed.

Zimbabwe

Question

Asked by Lord Jones of Cheltenham

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of preparations for presidential elections in Zimbabwe.[HL2064]

Lord Popat: Zimbabwe's elections took place on 31 July. While the Government are pleased the election day itself passed off peacefully, we have serious concerns over the conduct of the election. As the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my right hon. Friend the Member for Richmond (Yorks) (Mr Hague) has noted in his Statement on 3 August, we are gravely concerned by significant irregularities outlined by African Union and Southern African Development Community observation missions, and those of the domestic observer groups, in their initial statements. These irregularities call into question the credibility of the election. It is vital that all allegations of electoral violations are investigated thoroughly. We will continue to monitor the situation in Zimbabwe and consider further reports from regional and local observer missions. In the mean time, the Government will continue to support the Zimbabwean people in their aspirations for a democratic, peaceful and prosperous future.

Answers received between Tuesday 13 August 2013and Monday 19 August 2013

Armed Forces: Royal Air Force

Question

Asked by Lord West of Spithead

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many (1) men, and (2) women, in the Royal Air Force are of the RAF Regiment specialisation.[HL1981]

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA387

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence (Lord Astor of Hever): The Royal Air Force Regiment is established for 354 Officers, up to and including Group Captain rank, and 2,206 Airmen, up to and including Warrant Officer rank. The RAF Regiment requires all personnel to be capable of dismounted close combat; hence—unlike all other RAF branches and trades—female personnel may not serve in the specialisation.

Banks: Iceland

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Deighton on 18 March (WA 96-7), what recent developments there have been in relation to HM Treasury’s claims for £2.413 billion in the administration of Icesave (Landsbanki hf), Heritable Bank plc and Kaupthing Singer & Friedlander Ltd; how much money has been repaid by the Icelandic Depositors and Investor Guarantee Fund; and whether they now expect to have to write off any of those banks’ debts.[HL2069]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Deighton): Full details of HM Treasury’s claims in the administrations of Landsbanki hf, Heritable Bank plc and Kaupthing Singer & Friedlander Ltd and recoveries are set out in notes 15, 23.6 and 30 of the Treasury Annual Report and Accounts 2012/13, which were published on 16 July 2013. The report can be accessed via the Government's web pages1. A summary is given in the tables below.

Forecast recoveries
InstitutionTotal amount lent £mCurrent recovery %Forecast recovery (2012-13) %

Kaupthing Singer & Friedlander (KSF)

494

77

85

Heritable

92

78

88

Icesave

3,073

49

100

Recoveries from administrators
InstitutionDividends received as at 31 March 2013 £000

Kaupthing Singer & Friedlander (KSF)

2,358,705

Heritable Bank plc

431,499

Icesave

2,233,429

In addition, the management commentary in chapter 4 of the Annual Report provides the following information on developments in relation to HM Treasury’s claims in the administration of Icesave:

In relation to the failed Icelandic bank Landsbanki (Icesave), HM Treasury also intervened to ensure that depositors were compensated for the share of their deposits which should have been guaranteed by the Icelandic Depositors and Investors Guarantee Fund (DIGF).

  29 Aug 2013 : Column WA388 

In a judgment announced on 28 January 2013, the EFTA Court found that Iceland was not obliged to ensure payment of compensation to depositors after the collapse of the Icesave in 2008. This means that HM Treasury can only make recoveries from the administration and not from the Icelandic government. Therefore the loan has been transferred from DIGF to statutory debt with effect from 28 January 2013. HM Treasury had assumed that interest would not be chargeable on this loan and it continues to be treated as an interest free loan with full capital recovery”.

1

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/ attachment_data/file/212752/hmtreasury_annual report_and_accounts_201213.pdf

Broadcasting: Digital Terrestrial Television

Question

Asked by Lord Clement-Jones

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the value of digital terrestrial television to the United Kingdom economy. [HL1843]

Baroness Stowell of Beeston: A report by Analysis Mason for DCMS and BIS and published in November 2012 considered the economic impact of spectrum to the UK economy. The report provided estimates of the economic value of digital terrestrial services using frequencies in the UHF spectrum band. The report is available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/impact-of-radio-spectrum-on-the-uk-economy-and-factors-influencing-future-spectrum-demand.

Broadcasting: Public Service Terrestrial Broadcasting

Question

Asked by Lord Clement-Jones

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what plans they have for the future of free at the point of use public service terrestrial broadcasting.[HL1844]

Baroness Stowell of Beeston: The Government’s plans for the future of free-at-the-point-of-use public service terrestrial broadcasting are set out in the recently published paper, Connectivity, Content and Consumers: Britains digital platform for growth (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/connectivity-content-and-consumers-britains-digital-platform-for-growth). We are particularly concerned to ensure that the free-to-view public service channels and content that the public value remain easily accessible and discoverable and that public service broadcasters are able to maximise their investment in high-quality UK-originated content. The Government plan to launch a consultation on the discoverability and accessibility of PSB content in the autumn, before bringing forward new legislative proposals as appropriate.

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA389

Burma

Questions

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what discussions they have held with the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Torture regarding the treatment of Muslim prisoners in Buttidaung prison in northern Rakhine State, Burma.[HL2021]

The Senior Minister of State, Department for Communities and Local Government & Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Baroness Warsi): The Government has not held recent discussions with the UN Special Rapporteur on Torture in relation to Burma. However, we engage regularly with UN Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights Situation in Burma, Tomas Ojea Quintana. During the March 2013 session at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva, there was discussion of Mr Quintana's report, which highlighted the practice of torture in places of detention in Burma, and set out allegations that Muslim prisoners in Buthitaung prison in Rakhine State had been tortured and beaten to death. British Embassy officials have made several visits to northern Rakhine State over recent months, and have received similar reports of torture in Buthitaung jail.

The Minister of State for International Development, my right hon. Friend the Member for Rutland and Melton (Mr Duncan), visited Burma and Rakhine State in June 2013, and raised our concerns about the treatment of prisoners in Buthitaung jail with the Minister for Border Affairs. Separately, our Ambassador has also discussed the position of Rohingya prisoners in Buthitaung jail with the Burmese Minister for Border Affairs.

During the visit of President Thein Sein to London from 14-16 July, the Prime Minister, my right hon. Friend the Member for Witney (Mr Cameron) and the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my right hon. Friend the Member for Richmond (Yorks) (Mr Hague), raised a range of human rights and ethnic issues. The Foreign Secretary urged the President to sign the Convention against Torture. The UK has lobbied consistently on this and we will continue to press the Burmese government to sign the Convention and its Optional Protocol.

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what guarantees they have received that funding for repayment of debts by the Government of Burma and written off by Her Majesty’s Government will not be redeployed for investment in the Burmese armed forces. [HL2023]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Deighton): The Paris Club reached an international agreement to clear Burma’s arrears to Paris Club creditors, including the UK, on 25 January. As part of this agreement, cancellation of arrears due to the UK is subject to Burma’s satisfactory performance under an IMF Staff Monitored Program. No additional funds have been created which could be diverted towards military spending.

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA390

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they will include Burma in the Foreign Secretary’s Preventing Sexual Violence Initiative.[HL2024]

Baroness Warsi: The Government regularly lobbies the Burmese Government on the rights of women, particularly on preventing sexual violence against women in conflict areas. During his recent visit to the UK, the Burmese President, Thein Sein, welcomed the Foreign Secretary, my right hon. Friend the Member for Richmond (Yorks) (Mr Hague)'s initiative on preventing sexual violence in conflict. As part of this initiative, our Embassy in Rangoon is working closely with the UN and other partners to identify options for increasing UK engagement in this area and on integrating protection and prevention against sexual violence in conflict and post-conflict environments into our existing work in Burma.

Through international non-governmental organisations, the UK already gives support to legal assistance centres in Burmese refugee camps in Thailand and to trauma care in camps in Kachin State, both of which deal with rape cases.

Asked by Baroness Goudie

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what representations they have made to the government of Burma regarding the reform of rape laws in Burma.[HL2047]

Baroness Warsi: While no specific representations have been made to the Burmese government on the reform of rape laws in Burma, the British Government regularly lobbies the Burmese government on the rights of women, particularly on preventing sexual violence against women in conflict areas.

Our Embassy in Rangoon funds local non-governmental partners which provide technical support to the Burmese Ministry of Social Welfare to help the Burmese government fulfil its obligations under the Convention for the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women, to which Burma is a signatory.

Asked by Baroness Goudie

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they have held discussions with any other government regarding a review as to whether Burma is upholding its obligations under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.[HL2048]

Baroness Warsi: While the British Government has not held discussions with other Governments regarding a review as to whether Burma is upholding its obligations under the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, we do hold regular discussions in the UN and EU on Burma’s human rights record.

During President Theirs Sein recent visit to London on 14-16 July, the President met with the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my right hon. Friend the Member for Richmond (Yorks)

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA391

(Mr Hague), who underlined the importance of international initiatives on human rights and Burma’s participation in relevant UN treaties was discussed.

Asked by Baroness Goudie

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many representations they made in the past year with respect to rape and sexual violence in Burma during United Nations Security Council discussions on resolutions 1325 and 1820.[HL2050]

Baroness Warsi: We regularly raise issues surrounding rape and sexual violence in Burma with international partners in UN Security Council discussions. The most recent discussion on Burma was the UN Security Council ‘Friends of Myanmar’ meeting on 10 July, which was addressed by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, and Vijay Nambiar, Special Adviser to the Secretary-General on Burma.

More broadly, we regularly lobby the Burmese government on the rights of women and children, particularly on preventing sexual violence against women and children in conflict areas. We are working with our partners in the UN Security Council working group on Children and Armed Conflict on a Burma country specific resolution, where we are pushing for language that calls for strong action against the perpetrators of sexual violence against children by the Burmese government.

Central African Republic

Question

Asked by Baroness Berridge

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what representations they have made to the government of the Central African Republic regarding the abduction of Monsignor Francis Saint Clair Siki, the rector of Bangui’s Immaculate Conception cathedral.[HL2075]

The Senior Minister of State, Department for Communities and Local Government & Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Baroness Warsi): We were not previously aware of this case. We are grateful to the noble Baroness for bringing it to our attention, and are seeking more information.

Creative Industries

Questions

Asked by Lord Wills

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what estimate they have made of the impact of current immigration policies on United Kingdom creative industries. [HL1785]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what estimate they have made of the contribution of immigrants to United Kingdom creative industries.[HL1786]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what estimate they have made of the impact of current immigration policies on the United Kingdom film and television industries.[HL1789]

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA392

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what estimate they have made of the contribution of immigrants to the United Kingdom film and television industries.[HL1790]

Baroness Stowell of Beeston: The Government believe that the creative industries are well catered for by the immigration system. We continue to welcome the brightest and best migrants to the UK who will boost our economy and enrich our cultural life.

No formal review of the impact has been conducted by the Government or the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC). However, at the request of the Government the MAC was commissioned to look at several specific aspects of the immigration policy. It concluded that creative occupations should continue to be considered under Tier 2 and that they should continue to be exempted from the minimum skills requirement (currently set at NQF 6, graduate level). The Government have accepted this recommendation.

Results of this review were published in February this year and can be found at:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/sitecontent/documents/aboutus/workingwithus/mac/34mac-sixth-review/

Economy

Question

Asked by Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what action they will take in the light of the findings of the Which? Quarterly Consumer Report July 2013 on consumers’ responses to the cost of living, and the price of energy, fuel and food.[HL2060]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Deighton): Budget 2013 announced measures to support households. The 1.89 pence per litre fuel duty increase that was planned for 1 September 2013 has been cancelled. The personal allowance was increased to £9,440 in April 2013, and will rise to £10,000 in April 2014, to support hard-working individuals. This is the largest cash increase ever. The Government is also helping to freeze council tax in every year of this Parliament, and has announced a two-year reduction in the rail fare cap.

Egypt

Questions

Asked by Baroness Uddin

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their assessment of the impact of the most recent killings of protestors in Egypt on stability in the region. [HL2011]

The Senior Minister of State, Department for Communities and Local Government & Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Baroness Warsi): On Saturday 27 July the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my right hon. Friend the Member for Richmond (Yorks)

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA393

(Mr Hague) issued a statement condemning the use of force against protestors in Egypt and called on all sides to reduce tension. We have continued to call on both sides to refrain from violence. We attach great importance to democratic transition in Egypt, which matters significantly for the regions long term stability.

Asked by Baroness Uddin

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what discussions, if any, they have had with the government of the United States on the removal from office of President Morsi in Egypt.[HL2012]

Baroness Warsi: We have had a number of discussions with key partners, including the US, at official and Ministerial level following the events in Egypt on 3 July. The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my right hon. Friend the Member for Richmond (Yorks) (Mr Hague) speaks to Secretary of State Kerry regularly on a wide range of issues, including Egypt. UK and US officials have regular and broad-ranging discussions on Egypt, as part of our wider foreign policy dialogue. We continue to work together with Egyptian interlocutors and our key partners, including the EU and the US government to support the swift return of a democratically elected civilian government.

Government Departments: Union Flag

Question

Asked by Lord Kilclooney

To ask Her Majesty’s Government which are the designated days for government buildings to fly the Union flag in (1) Wales, (2) England, (3) Scotland, and (4) Northern Ireland.[HL1901]

Baroness Stowell of Beeston: The Department for Culture, Media and Sport is responsible for informing all UK government departments of the designated days for the flying of the Union Flag. Devolved Administrations are responsible for issuing instructions for the flying of the Union Flag on buildings in their estate and others as necessary.

The designated days for the flying of the Union Flag are:

9 January

Birthday of the Duchess of Cambridge

20 January

Birthday of the Countess of Wessex

6 February

Her Majesty’s Accession

19 February

Birthday of the Duke of York

1 March

St David’s Day (in Wales only, see note 1)

10 March

Birthday of the Earl of Wessex

11 March

Commonwealth Day (second Monday in March)

17 March

St. Patrick’s Day (in Northern Ireland only, see note 5)

21 April

Birthday of Her Majesty the Queen

23 April

St George’s Day (in England only, see note 1)

9 May

Europe Day (see note 4)

2 June

Coronation Day

10 June

Birthday of the Duke of Edinburgh

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA394

15 June

Official celebration of Her Majesty’s birthday

21 June

Birthday of the Duke of Cambridge

17 July

Birthday of the Duchess of Cornwall

15 August

Birthday of the Princess Royal

10 November

Remembrance Day (second Sunday in November, see note 2)

14 November

Birthday of the Prince of Wales

20 November

Her Majesty’s Wedding Day

30 November

St Andrew’s Day (in Scotland only, see note 1)

Also

The day of the opening of a Session of the Houses of Parliament by Her Majesty (see note 3)

The day of the prorogation of a Session of the Houses of Parliament by Her Majesty (see note 3)

1. Where a building has two or more flag poles the appropriate national flag may be flown in addition to the Union Flag but not in a superior position. UK government buildings within the wider Whitehall area may fly the national flags alongside the Union Flag on their appropriate saint days.

2. Flags should be flown at full mast all day.

3. Flags should be flown on this day even if Her Majesty does not perform the ceremony in person. Flags should only be flown in the Greater London area.

4. Where the European flag is flown on this day, the Union Flag should fly alongside the European flag and, on UK government buildings that only have one flag pole, the Union Flag should take precedence.

5. The Union Flag only should be flown.

Health: Private Hospitals

Question

Asked by Lord Hunt of Kings Heath

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what was the total amount of tax relief provided to private hospitals with charitable status in the financial years 2011-12, and 2012-13.[HL2099]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Deighton): HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) does not at present separately identify the amount of tax relief given to charities by reference to the types of organisations that are given the reliefs.

HMRC publishes national statistics on the reliefs for which it is possible to produce an estimate of the total cost, in Table 10.2 of the charity tax statistics on its website.1

1

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/statistics/charity/table10-2.pdf

Homelessness: Rough Sleepers

Question

Asked by Lord Christopher

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what estimate they have made of the total number of rough sleepers in the United Kingdom and where they are most greatly concentrated; and how the total number breaks down into (1) those who suffer alcoholism or drug addiction, (2) those who are recidivist discharged offenders, and (3) others.[HL2105]

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The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Communities and Local Government (Baroness Hanham): The Government published rough sleeping statistics for England in February 2013. These are available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/rough-sleeping-in-england-autumn-2012. Figures for the rest of the United Kingdom are a matter for each devolved administration, although web-links to relevant information for Scotland and Wales are given on page 9 of the statistical release available at the web-link above.

Comprehensive data on rough sleepers, including support needs, is held under the Greater London Authority’s CHAIN (Combined Homeless and Information Network which covers London and contains detailed information on London's rough sleepers over the year) system. It shows that, in 2012/13 48% of people seen rough sleeping in London had an alcohol support need, 28% had a drug support need and 32% had experience of prison (Street to Home - CHAIN annual report 2012/13).

We are investing £470 million over four years (2011/12- 2014/15) to help prevent and tackle homelessness, rough sleeping and repossessions. This includes £34 million to the Greater London Authority to tackle rough sleeping across the capital.

In London No Second Night Out is making a big difference and all local authorities in England have committed to adopt the No Second Night Out approach by the end of 2013. The CHAIN annual data for 2012/13 shows that No Second Night Out helped ensure that three quarters (75%) of new rough sleepers do not spend a second night on London’s streets.

Immigration

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many immigrants were recorded as arriving in the United Kingdom in 2012; how many foreign nationals registered for national insurance numbers in 2012; and of those, in both instances, how many were Romanians.[HL2067]

Baroness Stowell of Beeston: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, Director General for Office for National Statistics, to Lord Laird, dated August 2013.

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question, To ask Her Majesty’s Government, how many immigrants were recorded as arriving in the United Kingdom in 2012; how many foreign nationals registered for national insurance numbers in 2012; and of those, in both instances, how many were Romanians.

The Office for National Statistics produces estimates of long-term international migration, primarily based on the International Passenger Survey (IPS).

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The latest available figures, based on the IPS, are for the period January 2011 to December 2011. The estimate of the number of immigrants arriving in the UK was 531,000, with a confidence interval of +/- 28,000. The estimate of the number of Romanian citizens arriving in the UK in this period was 8,000 with a confidence interval of +/- 3,000.

Immigration figures for 2012 will be available on 28th November 2013.

The information requested for the number of foreign nationals registered for national insurance numbers is available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-insurance-number-allocations-to-adult-overseas-nationals-entering-the-uk

I understand that the support staff in the House of Lords library are able to assist in extracting the information he requested.

Internet: Broadband

Question

Asked by Lord Patten

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their forecast of the date by which high speed broadband will be available in the Somerset towns of Bruton, Castle Cary and Wincanton.[HL1868]

Baroness Stowell of Beeston: I can confirm that the towns of Bruton, Castle Cary and Wincanton are within the area covered by the Connecting Devon and Somerset project. However, it is not possible to provide a date by which these areas will have better broadband services available before the detailed surveys, which are currently taking place, have been completed.

Overseas Aid

Question

Asked by Baroness Lister of Burtersett

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their response to the Office of the Children's Commissioner’s report Child Rights Impact Assessment of Budget Decisions: including the 2013 Budget, and the cumulative impact of tax-benefit reforms and reductions in spending on public services 2010–15.[HL2053]

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Deighton): It is important to consider the impact of all of this Government’s measures on households with children, and not just tax and welfare policy. The distributional analysis published in the “Impact on households” annexe at Spending Round 2013 remains the most robust and comprehensive assessment of the cumulative impact of tax, welfare and public spending measures on households.

The analysis shows that the top 20 per cent of households continue to make the greatest net contribution towards reducing the deficit (both in cash terms and as a percentage of income), and on average the bottom 20 per cent of households receive over five times as much support from public spending as they contribute in tax.

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Press Regulation

Question

Asked by Lord Prescott

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Gardiner of Kimble on 25 July (WA 235), whether they will now arrange for the list of members to be published in the Official Report; and if not, why not.[HL2086]

Baroness Stowell of Beeston: Details of Committee membership have been published on the Privy Council website:

http://privycouncil.independent.gov.uk/royal-charters/petitions-for-royal-charters/

Schools: iPads and Tablets

Question

Asked by Baroness Lister of Burtersett

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what proportion of schools they expect will require children to bring an iPad or other tablet device to school in the new school year; and what support they will provide to low income families in such cases.[HL2051]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Nash): The Government leaves it to schools to make decisions about tablet devices including how they are funded and purchased. We do not monitor this centrally nor prescribe how this happens.

Departmental guidance makes clear to schools that we do not expect children to be treated any differently or excluded from any activity if a parent cannot make, or refuses to make, a contribution towards the cost of that activity or related equipment. Our experience is that schools are keen not to disadvantage pupils from low income families where they choose to introduce tablet devices. Information is freely available to schools to help them with this, for example from the e-Learning Foundation charity.

The Government provides additional funding to schools specifically to boost the attainment of disadvantaged pupils in the form of the Pupil Premium. The Premium rose from £623 per pupil in 2012-13 to £900 per pupil in 2013-14 and will rise again in 2014- 15 and be worth £2.5 billion in total. We do not prescribe the uses that the Pupil Premium is put to: schools are best placed to understand the needs of their pupils and decide on the most appropriate additional support for their disadvantaged pupils.

Answers received between Tuesday 20 August 2013and Tuesday 27 August 2013

Asylum Seekers

Question

Asked by Lord Roberts of Llandudno

To ask Her Majesty’s Government , further to the Written Answer by Lord Taylor of Holbeach on 10 July (WA 44-5), what evidence they have, and from which sources, that allowing asylum seekers to

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA398

apply for jobs which do not appear on the shortage occupation list would act as a pull factor for economic migrants.[HL1862]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): The Government’s primary objective is to protect the UK’s resident labour market by avoiding circumvention of strict controls on the terms of access to work applied to all migrants from outside the EU. The publications Skilled, Shortage, Sensible (February 2013) and Analysis of the Impacts of Migration (January 2013) by the Migration Advisory Committee assess what labour market access it is sensible for non-EU migrants to have; and the displacement effect of migration on the resident labour market.

Asked by Lord Roberts of Llandudno

To ask Her Majesty’s Government , further to the answer by Earl Attlee on 20 May (HL Deb, col 625), how they define those not in need of protection claiming asylum for economic reasons.[HL2084]

Lord Taylor of Holbeach: All asylum applications made in the UK, including those which may be motivated wholly or in part by economic factors, will be considered in accordance with our international obligations. If the individual is found to be in need of protection as a refugee the distinction is irrelevant, but it is vital to the integrity of the asylum process that asylum is not perceived as a way of by-passing the regulation of the employment of overseas nationals in the UK.

Electoral Registration

Question

Asked by Lord Tyler

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether, following recent pilots, they have any plans to allow higher-tier local authorities to share data with lower-tier authorities for the purposes of electoral registration. [HL1998]

Lord Wallace of Saltaire: The recent research on data matching to identify missing electors included an exploration of the process implications of removing the legal barrier that prevents lower tier councils in two-tier areas from accessing data held by the upper-tier. The Cabinet Office evaluation of the pilots established that the lower tier councils found data matching with datasets from their upper tier a useful exercise.

The Government is currently considering whether to allow upper and lower tier local authorities to share data for electoral registration purposes, so giving Electoral Registration Officers in those areas access to the kinds of data already available to their counterparts in unitary authorities.

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA399

Higher Education: Overseas Students

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many Confirmations of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) were assigned and issued by (1) universities, and (2) other educational institutions, for non-European Union students to enable their entry to the United Kingdom since February 2010; and how many students were reported as not fulfilling their study and other obligations by those two types of institutions for each year since 2010.[HL1661]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): We do not publish details of the number of Confirmations of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) assigned by sponsors; we only publish details of CAS used in support of an application for entry clearance.

In each year since 2010, the number of CAS assigned by universities and by other educational institutions and then used to apply for a Tier 4 visa is:

UniversitiesOther educational institutions

2013

10,965

6,006

2012

156,536

53,574

2011

152,479

118,205

2010

143,130

106,037

Figures for 2013 are from January to March only.

The information is based on the latest published Home Office immigration statistics which are available from the Library of the House and on the Department's website at: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/home- office/series/ immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

Home Office do not hold Information relating to the number of students reported as not fulfilling their study and other obligations in the format required. This could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Homelessness: Rough Sleepers

Question

Asked by Lord Roberts of Llandudno

to ask Her Majesty’s Government what provisions are in place to allow access to services to (1) adults and (2) children, who are stateless rough-sleepers.[HL1861]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what support and financial assistance they are providing to non-governmental organisations in (1) Romania, and (2) the United Kingdom, to support reconnection programmes for migrants from Romania who may have fallen on hard times.[HL1863]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what support they are providing to Romanian and Bulgarian authorities to prepare potential migrants from those countries for life in the United Kingdom.[HL1864]

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA400

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they have any plans to provide education, work qualifications, or financial planning assistance to migrants arriving in the United Kingdom from Romania and Bulgaria in 2014.[HL1865]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): The Government wants to ensure that those who come to the UK from the European Union or from further afield do so for the right reasons—to contribute to our country not because they are drawn by the attractiveness of our benefits system or the opportunity to use public services. As the Prime Minister announced in his immigration speech on 25 March we are taking action to strengthen controls on European Economic Area access to the benefits system, including strengthening the qualifying test and also providing that out of work European Economic Area migrants will only have a right to reside and an entitlement to claim certain benefits for period six months unless they can demonstrate that they are genuinely seeking employment and have a genuine chance of securing a job.

We are also taking forward negotiations with European partners to explore the wider scope for protecting the benefits system from misuse, and will sharpen our approach to operating reciprocal cost recovery arrangements with other European Union member states where European Union visitors use the National Health Service.

The Government is determined to tackle migrant rough-sleeping. Over half of London's rough sleepers are foreign nationals.

The Government is working with local authorities and the third sector to deliver voluntary reconnection to the migrant’s home country. In some cases those who refuse to return home may be targeted for enforced return and be administratively removed.

We believe that it is important that migrants who come to this country are able to support themselves so they do not become destitute. We are providing further funding of £50,000 to the Passage Day centre in London to extend it’s “Before You Go” campaign beyond Poland into Romania, Bulgaria and Lithuania. This voluntary sector led campaign highlights the problems faced by destitute economic migrants. The Passage will be working with non-government organisations and churches in home countries in the expanded European Union.

We are investing £470 million over four years (2011/12-2014/15) to help prevent and tackle homelessness, rough sleeping and repossessions. This includes £34 million to the Greater London Authority to tackle rough sleeping across the capital. Those local authorities who face problems with rough sleeping by economic migrants may chose to fund reconnection services. The Greater London Authority funds such a service in London.

Homeless migrants, who satisfy residency rules and are in receipt of qualifying benefits, may be entitled to attend courses in English and English for Speakers of Other Languages.

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There are a range of services across the country to help rough sleepers, including the No Second Night Out initiative and reconnection services. Children sleeping rough are the responsibility of social services.

Immigration

Question

Asked by The Earl of Clancarty

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many (1) applications, (2) successful entries, and (3) refusals, there have been for the permitted paid engagement scheme administered by the UK Border Agency since its introduction; and how many persons in each category have been professional artists and entertainers.[HL1812]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): The visitor route for permitted paid engagements (PPE) was introduced on 6 April 2012. From 6 April 2012 to 31 March 2013 a total of 383 visit visa applications have been made under the scheme. As of 31 March 2013, 305 applications resulted in visas being issued, while 66 were refused. A further 12 cases were undecided at the time.

We are unable to advise how many non-visa nationals entered the United Kingdom using this route. Nor can we advise how many successful visa applicants subsequently entered the United Kingdom, or how many of the applicants were professional artists and entertainers. To provide this data would require a disproportionately expensive manual case by case search to collate.

(1) The figures quoted have been derived from management information and are therefore provisional and subject to change. This information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols.

(2) Data relates to main applicants only.

(3) Data relates to PPE applications received, and decisions made on those applications, between 6 April 2012 and 31 March 2013.

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Asked by Lord Laird

To ask Her Majesty’s Government , further to the Written Answer by Lord Taylor of Holbeach on 24 July (WA 208), whether arriving Intra-Company Transfer (ICT) workers and their dependants are counted within the net migration statistics; how many ICT workers and their dependants arrived in the United Kingdom in the last 12 months; what time limit is placed on their stay in the United Kingdom; and whether their time as an ICT worker counts towards the time required for eligibility to obtain indefinite leave to remain in the United Kingdom.[HL2068]

Lord Taylor of Holbeach: The net migration statistics are compiled by the Office for National Statistics based largely on the International Passenger Survey (IPS) and are not based on the type of visa held (where applicable) by an individual. ONS use the UN recommended definition of a long-term international migrant. That is someone who changes his or her country of usual residence for a period of at least a year, so that the country of destination effectively becomes the country of usual residence. This is the definition used to calculate net migration, and is also used for the UK usually resident population estimate series. Further information about the ONS data is provided in “Long-term International Migration: frequently asked questions” at: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/guide-method/method-quality/specific/population-and-migration/international-migration-methodology/long-term international- migration-frequently-asked-questions.pdf

The latest available information for passenger arrivals for Intra-Company Transfer workers is given in the table below. The available information does not separately identify Intra-Company Transfer workers' dependants. Corresponding information for Q3 (July-September) 2012 and 04 (October-December) 2012 is planned to be published on 29 August 2013.

Skilled work (Tier 2) passenger arrivals (1)(2)
Type of applicantCategory2011Q12011Q22011Q32011Q42012Q1Number of journeys 2012 Q2

Main

Total

8,640

8,350

9,430

7,280

8,890

9,140

Dependant

Total

4,530

5,330

5,910

4,090

4,220

5,290

of which

Main

Tier 2 - General

2,430

2,440

2,980

2,250

2,680

3,070

Main

Tier 2 - Intra Company Transfer

5,790

5,480

6,000

4,640

5,790

5,650

Main

Tier 2 - Minister of Religion

115

95

135

115

155

140

Main

Tier 2 - Sportsperson

305

340

320

270

270

280

Notes

(1) Passengers given leave to enter the United Kingdom, excluding EEA and Swiss nationals

(2) Data may not sum to totals due to rounding

Source:

Immigration Statistics January-March, table ad_02_q

The latest Home Office immigration statistics on passenger arrivals are published in the release Immigration Statistics January-March, which is available from the library of the House and on the Department’s website at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/ immigration-statistics¬january-to-march-2013

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There are four sub-categories of Tier two (Intra Company Transfer): Long-term staff; Short-term staff; Graduate trainee, and Skills transfer. The time limits placed on these sub-categories vary.

Currently, Tier 2 (Intra Company Transfer) long-term staff are given an initial grant of leave to cover the period of engagement plus one month or three years plus one month, whichever is the shorter. They may then apply for further leave to remain and may be given leave to cover the period of engagement plus one month, or two years plus one month, or the period required to take the applicant’s total stay in the UK to the maximum time allowed, whichever is the shorter. The maximum time allowed varies depending on their earnings. Those earning less than £152,100 are limited to a maximum stay in the UK of five years. Those earning £152,100 or more are limited to a maximum of nine years.

Applicants in the short-term staff and graduate trainee sub-categories are given an initial grant of leave to cover the period of engagement plus one month or 12 months, whichever is the shorter. They may then apply for further leave to remain and may be given grants of leave to cover the period of engagement plus 14 days or the period required to take the applicant’s total stay in the UK to 12 months, whichever is shorter. 12 months is the maximum period of stay allowed in these subcategories.

Applicants in the skills transfer sub-category are given an initial grant of leave to cover the period of engagement plus one month or six months, whichever is the shorter. They may then apply for further leave to remain and may be given grants of leave to cover the period of engagement plus 14 days or the period required to take the applicant’s total stay in the UK to six months, whichever is shorter. Six months is the maximum period of stay allowed in these subcategories.

Dependants of Intra Company Transfer migrants are granted leave in line with the person whom they are the dependent of.

Tier 2 (Intra Company Transfer) migrants who arrived in the UK having been granted Entry Clearance under the Immigration Rules from 6 April 2010 cannot apply for indefinite leave to remain under the Points-Based System.

Asked by Lord Roberts of Llandudno

to ask Her Majesty’s Government how they define (1) economic migrant, (2) refugee, (3) asylum seeker, (4) failed asylum seeker, (5) illegal immigrant, and (6) detainee; and how they define would-be illegal immigrants, as used in the Home Office and Border Force press release on 26 July.[HL2082]

Lord Taylor of Holbeach: The information requested is shown in the following table:

Economic migrant

A migrant whose primary purpose for coming to the UK is work; or a migrant who is already in the UK for work.

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Refugee

Defined by the 1951 United Nations Convention relating to the Status of Refugees and 1967 Protocol (the “Refugee Convention”), as being a person who, owing to a well founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion, is outside the country of their nationality. The individual is unable or, owing to such a fear, is unwilling to avail themselves of the protection of that country; or who, not having a nationality and being outside the country of their former habitual residence, is unable, or owing to such fear is unwilling to return to it. Recognition of refugee status by the UK is a pre-requisite to the grant of asylum in the country.

Asylum seeker

Under the Immigration Rules (327), an asylum applicant is a person who either; (a) makes a request to be recognised as a refugee under the Geneva Convention on the basis that it would be contrary to the United Kingdom’s obligations under the Geneva Convention for him to be removed from or required to leave the United Kingdom, or (b) otherwise makes a request for international protection.

Failed asylum seeker

An individual whose application for asylum and other forms of protection has been refused and who has exhausted their appeal rights.

Illegal immigrant

An individual who has entered or remained in the UK unlawfully.

Detainee

An individual who is being detained under paragraph 16 of Schedule two to the Immigration Act 1971, including: whose nationality and/or leave status is still being determined; whose leave have been suspended and there is an outstanding question over whether or not their leave should be cancelled; and where there are reasonable grounds to suspect that removal directions will be given.

Would-be illegal immigrants (from the web story)

Individuals found hiding in lorries in Northern France who are attempting to gain entry to the UK clandestinely.

Asked by Lord Roberts of Llandudno

To ask Her Majesty’s Government , further to the Written Answer by Lord Taylor of Holbeach on 25 July (WA 227), how they define “brightest and the best”.[HL2083]

Lord Taylor of Holbeach: Migration has enriched our culture and strengthened our economy, but unlimited migration places unacceptable pressure on public services. This is why the Government’s policies look to attract the “brightest and the best”, who are most likely to make a positive contribution to this country.

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We use the phrase “brightest and best” to describe a range of desirable migrants which the UK wishes to attract. These include genuine students, entrepreneurs, investors and skilled workers.

Asked by Lord Laird

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the accuracy of the Annual Population Survey compared to the International Passenger Survey in recording the number of immigrants entering the United Kingdom year on year.[HL2116]

Lord Wallace of Saltaire: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, Director General for Office for National Statistics, to Lord Laird, dated August 2013

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question, to ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the accuracy of the Annual Population Survey compared to the International Passenger Survey in recording the number of immigrants entering the United Kingdom year on year. [HL2116]

ONS uses the International Passenger Survey (IPS) data to estimate Long-Term International Migration (LTIM), with adjustments made for asylum seekers, people whose intentions change with regards to their length of stay. and migration to and from Northern Ireland. LTIM estimates adhere to the UN definition of a long-term international migrant. which states that a long-term migrant is a person who changes his or her country of usual residence for a period of at least a year.

ONS uses the Annual Population Survey (APS) data to estimate the number of people currently residing in the UK. It is a stock estimate of UK residents that includes both short- and long-term migrants, and does not differentiate between them. By contrast the IPS data separately identifies the net flows of long-term migrants.

ONS have made an assessment of the different sources of data on international migration and published a report, available at the following link:

http://www. ons gov. uk/ons/rel/migration1/ population-by-country-of-birth-and-nationality/sources-of¬international-migration-data/differences-between-sources-of-international-migration-data. pdf

This research focused on the Labour Force Survey, Annual Population Survey. International Passenger Survey and Long Term International Migration, and highlighted that there were key definitional and coverage differences between the sources, which meant that data derived from these different sources are not directly comparable. ONS concluded that the IPS is currently the most appropriate source for the calculation of long-term international migration based on the UN definition of a long-term migrant.

29 Aug 2013 : Column WA406

Asked by Lord Laird

To ask Her Majesty’s Government , further to the Written Answer by Lord Taylor of Holbeach on 3 July (WA 191-2), what estimate they have made of the costs associated with quality-assuring data related to the number of non-European Economic Area immigrants sponsored by each tier two and tier five employer prior to possible publication; whether the figures are calculated annually within the Home Office; and what are the reasons why disclosure might be unsuitable.[HL2118]

Lord Taylor of Holbeach: The Home Office is not able to provide an estimate of the overall monetary cost of quality assuring such data without first undertaking a large scale resource intensive data production and quality assurance exercise.

The resource required to cross-reference, manually verify and quality assure data relating to each migrant employed by more than 26,000 registered sponsors, particularly where it has no plans to publish the data and where this information has not been requested, would be disproportionately costly. There are no statutory reasons why data cannot be published.

Immigration: Deportation

Question

Asked by Lord Judd

to ask Her Majesty’s Government on how many occasions in 2012 they were prevented from deporting criminals who were not United Kingdom citizens following the completion of their sentences by rulings of the United Kingdom courts citing Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights. [HL518]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): In answering this question, we have taken “occasions … prevented from deporting” to mean the number of appeals allowed against deportation by foreign national offenders (FNOs) on the grounds of Article eight of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR).

In 2012, a total of 299 FNOs had appeals allowed on Article eight Human Rights grounds (with or without other articles).

1. All figures quoted have been derived from management information and are therefore provisional and subject to change. This information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols.

2. Data relates to appeals determined between 1 January and 31 December 2012, where FNOs appealed following completion of their sentence, and where the appeal was allowed on Article 8 grounds.

3. Figures may include appeals originally lodged against deportation and asylum.

Asked by Lord Roberts of Llandudno

to ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they intend to implement any of the recommendations of the National Independent Commission on Enforced

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Removal Additional Findings and Recommendations report, and specifically the proposals for (1) a multi-disciplinary panel for complex returns, (2) a more robust system for regular and appropriate licensing of contracted detainee custody officers and escort staff, (3) independent oversight of the enforced removal process, and (4) pain-free restraint techniques appropriate for use during enforced removals. [HL2085]

Lord Taylor of Holbeach: The Home Office has an action plan in respect of the issues raised in the report.

Home Office Immigration Enforcement has recently established the Complex and Scheduled Removals Team in order to consolidate the necessary skills to review complex cases and determine the most effective, humane and low risk method of return and will continue to engage with the Commission.

The requirements stipulated by Home Office Immigration Enforcement for Detainee Custody Officers (DCOs) are higher than those of the Security Industry Authority for accreditation. There are therefore no plans to seek accreditation for DCOs from the Security Industry Authority.

Independent oversight of complaints is provided by the Prisons and Probation Ombudsman. Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Prisons’ statutory remit covers detention facilities and escort arrangements. Independent Monitoring Boards have monitored charter flight removals as part of a pilot exercise.

The Independent Advisory Panel on Non-Compliance Management (IAPNCM) has been established to provide support to the National Offender Management Service in the design of the new training package for use by Detainee Custody Officers who escort individuals being removed from the United Kingdom and to provide independent advice to Home Office Immigration Enforcement on the quality and safety of the new package, and in particular of the use of force techniques. The panel have not yet completed their work.

Immigration: Detention

Question

Asked by Lord Ramsbotham

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how much has been paid to families in cases where courts have found that parents were unlawfully held in immigration detention and separated from their children. [HL2109]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): The information required is not readily available and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

National Readership Survey

Question

Asked by Lord Pearson of Rannoch

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made as to National Readership Survey social grading of those who since 1997 have (1) entered

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the United Kingdom for permanent settlement, and (2) emigrated from the United Kingdom. [HL2042]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): The Home Office has made no assessment of those entering the UK for permanent settlement or those emigrating using the National Readership Survey classification of social grading.

Passports

Question

Asked by Lord Marlesford

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many forged United Kingdom passports have been found by United Kingdom authorities in each of the last five years.[HL1793]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): The Home Office does not hold data on the number of forged United Kingdom passports detected by United Kingdom authorities.

Philip Machemedze

Question

Asked by Lord Maginnis of Drumglass

To ask Her Majesty’s Government , further to the Written Answers by Lord Wallace of Tankerness on 21 June 2011 (WA 290), Lord Howell of Guildford on 22 June 2011 (WA 316), Baroness Browning on 14 July 2011 (WA 213-4), and Lord Henley on 19 March 2012 (WA 145), what is the residential status of Zimbabwean Central Intelligence Organisation operative Philip Machemedze, who has admitted kidnapping and torture, and is now resident in Wales.[HL1904]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): For reasons of confidentiality, the Home Office does not routinely comment on the residential status of individuals.

Planning

Question

Asked by Lord Greaves

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what principles they apply to the provision of financial compensation to local communities and residents where there is large-scale local development that is controversial, over and above planning gain contributions in planning legislation and other statutory compensation procedures; whether such compensation is specific to the energy sector; and whether they leave decisions about such compensation for developers to determine.[HL2121]

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The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Communities and Local Government (Baroness Hanham): The National Planning Policy Framework sets out the Government’s planning policies for England, including when it would be appropriate for local planning authorities to consider whether otherwise unacceptable development could be made acceptable through the use of planning conditions or obligations. There are no general planning requirements on developers to provide compensation to local residents and planning obligations should only be sought where they are necessary to make the development acceptable in planning terms. The existing statutory compensation schemes in England are limited to compensating people for the depreciation in value of their land due to the adverse effect of the construction and use of “public works”. This is restricted to the effect of certain physical factors including noise, vibration and smell but not loss of a view. “Public works” are defined as “any highway, any aerodrome and any works on land provided or used in the exercise of statutory powers and which have statutory immunity from actions for nuisance”. Outside the planning system, a number of energy companies provide a variety of different amounts and types of community benefits on a voluntary basis.

The Government has periodically on a case-by-case basis recognised the particular impacts on local communities that can arise from major infrastructure projects. For example, the Department for Energy and Climate Change recently announced that the scale and duration of the impact of new nuclear power stations on their localities is to be recognised by ensuring communities benefit from the role they play in national power generation. Last year, recognising the exceptional nature of the project, the Government confirmed that residents affected by the first phase of HS2 from London to the West Midlands will be offered a comprehensive package of compensation measures which go significantly beyond statutory requirements.

Political Parties and Elections Act 2009

Question

Asked by Lord Tyler

To ask Her Majesty’s Government when they plan to bring into force sections 10 and 11 of and Schedule 4 to the Political Parties and Elections Act 2009. [HL1997]

Lord Wallace of Saltaire: There is a need for the Government to ensure that these provisions are workable in practice as well as consistent with the wider legislative framework. There is however already a robust legal framework in place to ensure that only individuals on the electoral register and organisations that carry on business in the UK can make donations to political organisations in the UK. These provisions provide an important safeguard.

Questions for Written Answer

Question

Asked by Lord Judd

To ask Her Majesty’s Government when they will answer Question for Written Answer HL518, tabled on 3 June.[HL1506]

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The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): I refer the noble Lord to the answer I gave today. I apologise for the delay in providing a response.

Torture

Question

Asked by Lord Roberts of Llandudno

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the recommendations contained in the Freedom from Torture report The Poverty Barrier: The Right to Rehabilitation for Survivors of Torture in the UK, specifically for (1) HM Government as a whole, (2) the Home Office, (3) the Ministry of Justice, (4) the Legal Aid Agency and (5) the Department for Work and Pensions.[HL1911]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): The Government notes the recommendations in this report and in particular will take them into account when considering any future changes to asylum support arrangements, including the provisions for vulnerable groups such as torture survivors. The Government published the findings of its review of asylum support rates in a Written Ministerial Statement on 6 June 2013, Official Report, col. 119WS and has no immediate plans to review them again or to respond formally to this report.

Asked by Lord Avebury

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they have (1) suspended their plans to introduce the United Nations Convention Against Torture definition of torture into Chapter 55 of the Enforcement Instructions and Guidance; (2) issued a notice to Home Office case workers and Immigration Removal Centre doctors that, until further notice, they must apply the definition of torture set out by Mr Justice Burnett in the case of EO for the purpose of Rule 35 policy; and (3) added to the January 2013 Asylum Instruction on Rule 35 a clarification that, until further notice, torture in the context of Rule 35 must be regarded as that defined by Mr Justice Burnett in the case of EO.[HL1921]

Lord Taylor of Holbeach: Following the judgment by Mr Justice Burnett in the case of EO, I can confirm that the Home Office has suspended plans to introduce the definition of torture set out in the United Nations Convention against Torture (UNCAT) into chapter 55 of the Enforcement Instructions and Guidance (EIG). Arrangements are also in hand to remove the UNCAT definition of torture from the January 2013 Asylum Instruction on Rule 35 processes and to issue notices to Home Office case workers and doctors working in Immigration Removal Centres informing them that, until further notice, they must apply the definition of torture set out by Mr Justice Burnett in the case of EO when either completing or considering Rule 35 reports.

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Thursday 29 August 2013

The following eight Questions should have been published on Monday 5 August.

Children and Families Bill

Questions

Asked by Baroness Hughes of Stretford

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether an impact assessment was undertaken on the Children and Families Bill; and, if so, what were the conclusions of that assessment.[HL1966]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether a risk assessment was undertaken on the Children and Families Bill; and, if so, what were the conclusions of that assessment.[HL1967]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Nash): The impact of the provisions in the Bill was fully considered during the development of the legislation and the Government continues to consider the impact that the reforms will have as implementation plans are developed. Risks are assessed and managed in relation to each individual part of the Bill, in the context of the wider reforms which the legislation supports.

The Government’s conclusions about the financial impact of the Bill are summarised in paragraphs 648 – 651 of the Explanatory Notes. Impact assessments, and additional evidence of about the economic impact of the Bill provisions, have been made available to Parliament as follows.

Full Impact Assessments for Parts 6-8 of the Bill were published on introduction and are available in the House Library and online at the following links:

Shared parental leave (Parts 6 & 7):

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/110692/13-651-modern-workplaces-shared-parental-leave-and-pay-impact-assessment2.pdf

Flexible working (Part 8):

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/modern-workplaces-consultation-government-response-on-flexible-working-impact-assessment.

For Parts 1 to 5 of the Bill, for which the Government’s Regulatory Powers Committee did not require full Impact Assessments on Introduction, the Government has published evidence packs explaining the impact of these parts of the Bill on the public sector and in respect of equalities and children’s rights considerations. These assessments are available in the House Library, and online at the following links:

Adoption (Part 1):

http://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/pdf/a/adoption%20-%20evidence%20of%20impact.pdf

Family Justice (Part 2):

http://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/pdf/f/family%20justice%20-%20evidence%20of%20impact1.pdf

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Special Educational Needs (Part 3):

http://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/pdf/s/sen%20evidence%20pack.pdf

Childcare (Part 4):

http://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/pdf/c/childcare%20-%20evidence%20of%20impact.pdf

Office of the Children’s Commissioner (Part 5):

http://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/pdf/o/office%20of%20the%20childrens%20commissioner%20-% 20evidence%20of%20impact.pdf

Children: Looked-after Children

Questions

Asked by Baroness Jones of Whitchurch

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what representations the Department for Education has received from (1) organisations representing children in care, (2) the Association of Directors of Children’s Services, and (3) private sector contractors, regarding the removal of the requirement for separate Ofsted inspection of social work functions for looked after children.[HL1948]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what representations the Department for Education has received from (1) organisations representing children in care, (2) the Association of Directors of Children’s Services, and (3) private sector contractors, regarding the delegation of social work functions for looked after children to external providers.[HL1949]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Nash): The Department for Education consulted on both these proposals in January and February 2012. Responses were received, from among others, a number of individual providers in the private and voluntary sectors, their representative bodies, several local authorities and the Children’s Society. The Association of Directors of Children’s Services did not respond to the consultation. A full list of respondents and analysis of their submissions has been publishedi.

No further representations have been received apart from a letter from Devon County Council expressing support.

i https://www.education.gov.uk/consultations/index.cfm?action=conResults&consultationId=1869&external=no&menu=3

Social Work Practice Pilot

Questions

Asked by Baroness Jones of Whitchurch

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what proportion of the 15 local authorities which have participated in the social work practice pilot programme since 2008 operated as an employee-owned partnership. [HL1945]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government which of the 15 local authorities that have participated in the social work practice pilot programme enabled by part 1 of the Children and Young People Act 2008 are still operating a social work practice.[HL1946]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, for each of the 15 local authorities which have participated in the social work practice pilot programme since

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2008, (1) what was the start and end date of their participation in the pilots; (2) what was the duration of the contract with the social work practice as part of the pilot; (3) how many children and young people were under the responsibility of each social work practice during the pilot as a proportion of all the authority’s looked after children; (4) how many qualified social workers the social work practice employed during the pilot; and (5) how many non-social-work-qualified staff were employed by the social work practice during the pilot, and what were their roles.[HL1947]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools (Lord Nash): The Social Work Practices pilot ran from 2008 to 2012. With the end of the pilot, the Department for Education no longer directly monitors arrangements in the participating local authorities. We believe, however, that six local authorities retain some or all of the elements tested under piloting arrangements: Barnet, Blackburn with Darwen, Bristol, Kent, Norfolk and Staffordshire.

The start and end date of each pilot is contained in the table below. The table also contains indicative figures for the number of children each pilot intended to include within scope of the social work practice. Numbers will, of course, have changed over the course of the pilot period. Data is not available for the number of social workers included in each pilot.

Local authorityParticipation/funding periodNumber of relevant children in Practice*Total number of relevant children in local authority

Blackburn with Darwen

2008-09 to 2011-12

100-200

315

Hillingdon

2008-09 to 2011-12

80-100

475

Kent

2008-09 to 2011-12

600 approx

600 approx

Liverpool

2008-09 to 2011-12

110

889

Staffordshire

2008-09 to 2011-12

160-180

672

Bristol

2010-11 to 2011-12

160

650

North Tyneside

2010-11 to 2011-12

400

440

Peterborough

2011-12

196

306

Barnet

2011-12

70-80

306

Norfolk

2011-12

not stated

962

Redbridge

2011-12

135

135

Richmond Upon Thames

2011-12

220

220

Sunderland

2011-12

300

600

Wakefield

2011-12

15-20

200

Shropshire

2011-12 (NB. No funding)

not stated

218

* Social Work Practices worked with children in care, care leavers or both. The figures provided in these columns detail the relevant groups or combination of groups depending on the proposal.