Connected and Autonomous Vehicles: The future? Contents

Appendix 5: Abbreviations, acronyms and technical terms

ABI

Association of British Insurers

ACC

Adaptive Cruise Control

ADAS

Advanced Driver Assistance Systems

AEB

Autonomous Emergency Braking

Autonaut

“Wavegliders” and “autonauts” are examples of unmanned surface vehicles powered by wave and solar energy. They are used for marine research and data collection.

Autonomous vehicles

‘Autonomous vehicles’ are those in which operation of the vehicle occurs without direct driver input to control the steering, acceleration, and braking and are designed so that the driver is not expected to monitor constantly the roadway while operating in self-driving mode.

AV

autonomous vehicle(s)

BEIS

Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

BMF

British Motorcyclists Federation

BPA

British Parking Association

CAV

Connected and autonomous vehicles. Some vehicles are both autonomous and connected whilst others are connected vehicles only and others are autonomous only.

CCAV

Centre for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles

CIHT

Chartered Institution of Highways & Transportation

Connected vehicles

‘Connected vehicles’ are vehicles that use any of a number of different communication technologies to communicate with the driver, other vehicles on the road (vehicle-to-vehicle [V2V]), roadside infrastructure (vehicle-to-infrastructure [V2I]), and the “Cloud.”

DCMS

Department for Culture, Media and Sport

Deeptrekker

Deeptrekkers are remotely operated vehicles—also called underwater drones—specifically designed and developed for underwater inspection.

DfT

Department for Transport

EPSRC

Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

HMG

Her Majesty’s Government

HMT

Her Majesty’s Treasury

HAU

Harper Adams University

ICO

Information Commissioner’s Office

IFoA

Institute and Faculty of Actuaries

IMarEST

Institute of Marine Engineering, Science & Technology

LTAs

Local Transport Authorities

MoD

Ministry of Defence

Mixed fleet

A ‘mixed fleet’ is when both traditional vehicles and CAV use roads at the same time.

Platooning

‘Platooning’ is where one lorry leads and makes the decisions for those behind that are wirelessly connected to form a road-train.

R&D

research and development

RACE

Remote Applications in Challenging Environments

RAS

Robotics and Autonomous Systems

RCUK

Research Councils UK

RoSPA

Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents

SAVI

Singapore Autonomous Vehicle Initiative

SIG

Special Interest Group

SMMT

Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders

Strategic road network

The ‘strategic road network’ comprises approximately 4,300 miles of motorways and major ‘trunk’ A-roads in England, and it is managed by Highways England (successor to the Highways Agency), a company wholly owned by the Secretary of State for Transport.

TfGM

Transport for Greater Manchester

TRL

Transport Research Laboratory

Trolley problem

The ‘trolley problem’ (or ‘trolley dilemma’) consists of a series of hypothetical scenarios developed by British philosopher Philippa Foot in 1967. The general form of the problem is this: there is a runaway trolley barrelling down the railway tracks. There are five people tied up ahead on the tracks and unable to move. The trolley is headed straight for them; you are standing some distance off, next to a lever. If you pull this lever, the trolley will switch to a different set of tracks. However, you notice that there is one person on the side track. You therefore have two options: (1) Do nothing, and the trolley kills the five people on the main track; or (2) Pull the lever, diverting the trolley onto the side track where it will kill one person. Which is the most ethical choice? In the context of CAV, the problem centres on whether an autonomous vehicle should act to protect the passengers, or external parties (such as pedestrians).

Type Approval

Type Approval is the confirmation that production samples of a design will meet specified performance standards. The specification of the product is recorded and only that specification is approved.

UKAEA

UK Atomic Energy Authority

Waveglider

“Wavegliders” and “autonauts” are examples of unmanned surface vehicles powered by wave and solar energy. They are used for marine research and data collection.





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