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Health: Cervical Smears

Lord Steinberg asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Lord Darzi of Denham): There are no plans to replace three-yearly cervical screening with annual cervical screening.



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In May 2004, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), part of the World Health Organisation, concluded that organised and quality controlled cervical screening can achieve an 80 per cent reduction in the mortality of cervical cancer. That women aged 25 to 49 should be screened no more than every three years, and women aged 50 to 64 no more than every five years. The IARC working group which made these conclusions consisted of 28 experts from 14 countries. This policy has been in operation in England since October 2003.

The National Health Service cervical screening programme is renowned as being one of the best in the world, and experts estimate it saves up to 5,000 lives per year.

Marine Environment: Pollution

Lord Jones of Cheltenham asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Minister of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord Rooker): In keeping with the European waste classification system, plastic waste is classified as non-hazardous, unless it is contaminated beyond specified threshold limits by dangerous substances. Further information on the classification of hazardous waste is provided in the Environment Agency's Technical Guidance document WM2, available on their website.

Lord Jones of Cheltenham asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Rooker: Pollutants enter the marine environment by a number of different pathways, from both land and sea-based sources, and are already subject to extensive controls under a variety of different measures, permits and licensing regimes. These include Part 2 of the Food and Environment Protection Act 1985 (FEPA), under which all deposits in the sea are controlled and the use of chemicals to disperse oil spills is authorised. The proposed Marine Bill intends to replace Part 2 of the FEPA with new streamlined arrangements for controlling such deposits and oil dispersants. It will also provide modernised inspection and enforcement tools and ensure that, where appropriate, a licensing authority will be able to require polluters to clean up pollution that they have caused.

Schools: Teachers

Lord Quirk asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Children, Schools and Families (Lord Adonis): Complete information relating to the degree qualification of graduates who began secondary school teaching careers is not available centrally.



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The table below shows the number of final year postgraduate mainstream initial teacher training (ITT) trainees who gained qualified teachers status (QTS) and entered a teaching post in the maintained sector within six months of gaining their QTS, broken down by the subject of their ITT training and their undergraduate degree.

Trainees entering maintained schools
Subject of ITT trainingNumber of postgraduate trainees with an undergraduate degree qualification in the subject of their ITT course
1998-991999-002000-012001-022002-032003-042004-052005-06

English

770

740

850

930

1,060

1,060

1,090

1,060

Mathematics

310

370

350

380

620

850

870

860

Science

850

950

1,080

1,250

1,170

1,420

1,360

1,520

Information and communications technology

30

50

80

100

250

310

330

370

Modern languages

450

520

580

570

570

630

420

530

All secondary subjects

4,410

4,740

4,720

5,280

6,760

7,880

7,970

8,050

Source: TDA's Performance Profiles

Lord Quirk asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Adonis: The information could be provided only at disproportionate cost.


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